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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog"

NC STATE UNIVERSITY 



2004-2005 





UN0ERGRAD 





atalos:. 




je« 




North Carolina State University 
I, North Carolina, 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

NCSU Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/undergraduatecat2004nort 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY 




Founded 1887 



Table of Contents 



General Information 2 

Historical Sketch 2 

Mission of North CaroHna State University 3 

Faculty 3 

Students 4 

Associations 4 

Accreditation 4 

Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination Policy 4 

Administration and Offices 6 

Academic Calendar 12 

Academic Degrees and Programs 13 

Undergraduate Degrees 13 

Preprofessional Programs 13 

Undergraduate Minors 14 

Agricultural Institute 15 

Graduate Degrees 15 

Arts Studies 15 

Honors and Scholars Programs 15 

University Honors Program 15 

University Scholars Program 16 

Scholarships 17 

Special Academic Programs 18 

Evening Undergraduate Degree Programs 18 

Non-Degree Certificate Programs 18 

Supplemental Instruction 18 

The Peer Mentor Program 19 

National Student Exchange Program 19 

North Carolina State Caldwell Fellows Program 19 

International Programs and Activities 19 

International Students 19 

Summer Institute in English for Speakers of Other Languages 20 

Alexander International Program 20 

Study Abroad 21 

Admission 23 

Freshman Admission 23 

Out-of^State Students 24 

Transfer Students 24 

International Students 25 

Unclassified Students 25 

Lifelong Education Students 25 

Servicemen's Opportunity Colleges 26 

College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 26 

Graduate Students 26 

New Student Orientation 26 

Required Immunization Documentation 26 

Registration 26 

NC State Tuition and Fees 27 

Residence Status for Tuition Purposes 29 

Financial Aid 30 



Table of Contents 



Student Housing 31 

Residence Halls 31 

Edward S. King Village (ES King Village) 32 

Off-Campus Housing 32 

Academic Policies and Procedures 32 

Academic Advising 32 

Progress Towards Degree 32 

Graduation Requirements 33 

Free Electives 34 

Classification of Students 34 

Course Load 35 

Grade Point Average 36 

Grading Guidelines 36 

Description of Letter Grades 36 

Audits (Undergraduate) 37 

Credit by Examination 37 

Credit by Examination Through Independent Studies 38 

Credit Only Option for Free Elective Courses 38 

Transfer Credit 38 

Academic Honors 38 

Grade Reports 39 

Transcripts of Academic Records 39 

Change of Name, Address, Telephone, or E-mail 40 

Double Degrees 40 

Intra-Campus Transfers (Curriculum Change) 40 

Academic Status 41 

Readmission of Former and Suspended Degree Students 42 

Withdrawal from the University 45 

Repeating Courses 46 

Code of Student Conduct 47 

Student Services 47 

Accident and Health Insurance 47 

Bookstores 47 

Campus Recreation 47 

The University Career Center 48 

Chaplains' Cooperative Ministry 49 

Interfaith Council 50 

Counseling 50 

Disability Services 50 

Food Service 50 

Health 51 

Transportation 51 

Student Activities 52 

Student Government 52 

Clubs and Societies 52 

Center for Student Leadership, Ethics, and Public Service 53 

Department of Campus Activities 53 

The Women's Center 54 

Facilities 54 

Arts NC State 54 



Table of Contents 



University Theatre 55 

Ticket Central 56 

Intercollegiate Athletics 56 

General Education Requirements 57 

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 62 

College of Design 86 

College of Education 94 

College of Engineering 100 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 120 

College of Management 140 

College of Natural Resources 146 

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 160 

College of Textiles 172 

College of Veterinary Medicine 178 

Other Academic and Administrative Units 182 

Academic Support Program for Student Athletes 182 

Biotechnology Program 182 

Computer Training Unit 182 

Continuing and Professional Education 182 

Cooperative Education Program 183 

Credit Programs & Summer Sessions 183 

Division of Undergraduate Affairs 183 

The First Year College 184 

The Graduate School 184 

Information Technology Division 184 

Institute for Emerging Issues 185 

Materials Research Center 185 

McKimmon Center for Extension and Continuing Education 185 

The McKimmon Conference and Training Center 186 

The NC State University Women's Center 186 

The NCSU Libraries 186 

New Student Orientation 187 

North Carolina Japan Center 187 

Office of Professional Development 187 

Office of Research and Graduate Studies 188 

Sea Grant College Program 188 

Transition Program 188 

Undergraduate Assessment 188 

Undergraduate Fellowship Advising 188 

University Honors Program 189 

Undergraduate Research 189 

Undergraduate Tutorial Center 189 

Virtual Advising Center 189 

Water Resources Research Institute 189 

Department of Music 190 

Department of Physical Education 190 

Department of Aerospace Studies (AIR FORCE ROTC) 191 

Department of Military Science (ARMY ROTC) 192 

Naval Science (NAVAL ROTC) 193 



Table of Contents 



Research Centers and Facilities 195 

Animal and Poultry Waste Management Center 195 

Center for Advanced Computing and Communication 195 

Center for Advanced Electronic Materials Processing (AEMP) 195 

Center for Advanced Processing and Packaging Studies 195 

Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes 196 

Center for Research and Development in Mathematics and Science Education 196 

Center for Research in Scientific Computation 196 

Center for Transportation and the Environment 196 

Chemical Toxicology Research and Phannacokinetics 196 

TheCVM Laboratory for Advanced Electron and Light Optical Methods 197 

Electric Power Research Center 197 

Electron Microscope Facilities 197 

Institute of Statistics 198 

Institute for Transportation Research and Education 198 

Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering Institute 198 

Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center 198 

Nuclear Services 198 

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) 198 

Plant Disease and Insect Clinic 199 

Power Semiconductor Research Center 199 

Precision Engineering Center 199 

The Research Analytical Instrumentation Facility (AIF) 200 

Southeastern Plant Environment Laboratory— Phytotron 200 

Triangle Universities Laboratory 200 

University Advancement 200 

University System of North Carolina 201 

History of the University of North Carolina 201 

LTNC Board of Governors 202 

Officers of the University of North Carolina 202 

North Carolina State University Board of Trustees 202 

North Carolina State University Council 202 

Policy on Illegal Drugs 203 

Course Descriptions 205 

Index 313 



North Carolina State University 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

North Carolina State University is a national center for research, teaching, and extension in the sciences and technologies, in the 
humanities and social sciences, and in a wide range of professional programs. 

Founded March 7, 1 887, by the North Carolina General Assembly under the provisions of the national Land-Grant Act, the university 
has marked more than a century of service to the state and nation. Sharing the distinctive character of land-grant universities 
nationwide, NC State has broad academic offerings, national and international linkages, and large-scale outreach, extension, and 
research activities. 

North Carolina State University Historical Sketch 

On March 7, 1887. the North Carolina General Assembly passed the act which authorized the establishment of the North Carolina 
College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. The Watauga Club of Raleigh and the statewide farmers' movement had convinced the 
legislature of the need to transfer the funds received by the state under the provisions of the Morrill Land-Grant Act of 1 862 from the 
University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill to a new land-grant college in Raleigh. The cornerstone of A. and M. College was laid in 
August 1888, and its doors were officially opened on October 3, 1889. 

Alexander Q. Holladay, the college's first president (1889-1899), and a faculty of five offered courses in agriculture, horticulture, 
pure and agricultural chemistry, English, bookkeeping, history, mathematics, physics, practical mechanics, and military science. The 
first freshman class numbered about fifty students. By the end of the institution's first decade, the resident enrollment had reached 
300. 

During the administration of George T. Winston (1899-1908) a new curriculum in textiles was developed and normal courses were 
offered in the summer for public school teachers, both men and women. The Agricultural Extension Service was established during 
the administration of Daniel H. Hill (1908-1916) and enrollment grew to more than 700. In 1917, during the administration of 
Wallace C. Riddick (1916-1 923 ). the institution's name was changed to North Carolina State College of Agriculture and 
Engineering. The introduction of the word 'engineering' was intended to reflect the increasing emphasis on the professional and 
theoretical as well as the practical aspects of technical education. 

In 1923, a major reorganization of the administration of the college began, and President Riddick resigned to become the first dean of 
the new School of Engineering. Eugene Clyde Brooks (1923-1934), the fifth president of State College, continued the reorganization 
with the creation of the School of Agriculture (later named the School of Agriculture and Forestry), the School of Science and 
Business, the School of Education, the School of Textiles, and the Graduate School. Resident enrollment rose to nearly 2,000 in 1929 
before the Depression caused enrollment to drop to approximately 1,500 in 1933. The first women graduates of State College 
received their degrees in 1927. 

In the midst of the Depression the General Assembly of 1931 attempted to promote economy and prevent unnecessary duplication 
among the three leading state institutions of higher education by establishing a single consolidated administration for the University 
of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering, and North Carolina College for 
Women in Greensboro. Dr. Frank Porter Graham, president of the University of North Carolina, was elected president of the 
consolidated university, and Dr Brooks, with the title of vice president, continued as chief administrative otTicer at State College. 
Among the consequences of consolidation were the phasing out of the School of Engineering at Chapel Hill and the School of 
Science and Business at Raleigh. A general college, later called the Basic Division, was established to provide two years of basic 
courses in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences as a foundation for students in the various degree-granting technical 
and professional schools. 

Colonel John W. Harrelson (1934-1953), Class of 1909, was the first alumnus to become administrative head of State College. 
Under the consolidated organization his title was Dean of Administration; later it was changed to Chancellor. During Harrelson's 
administration, the institution experienced the beginning of extraordinary growth in the aftermath of World War II. Two new schools 
were established: the School of Design and the School of Forestry (now Natural Resources). A multimillion-dollar expansion 
program was completed during the administration of Carey H. Bostian (1953-1959), and the program of student activities was 
greatly enlarged as the enrollment passed 5,000. 

The faculty and student population more than doubled during the administration of John T. Caldwell (1959-1975) and another new 
school was organized: the School of Physical Sciences and Applied Mathematics (now Physical and Mathematical Sciences). The 
School of General Studies, the successor to the Basic Division, was renamed the School of Liberal Arts and was authorized to otTera 
full range of bachelor's and master's degree programs in the humanities and social sciences. The name of the institution itself was 
changed in 1965 to North Carolina State University, signifying its new role as a comprehensive university. 

NC State's enrollment rose to 20,000 during the administration of Chancellor Joab L. Thomas (1976-1981). The School of 
Veterinary Medicine was established, the name of the School of Liberal Arts was changed to School of Humanities and Social 
Sciences, and North Carolina State University was recognized as one of two major research universities within the statewide 
University of North Carolina system. 

Bruce R. Poulton (1982-1990) became chancellor in the fall of 1982. A major expansion of the university's research budget, the 
establishment of a substantial endowment to provide enlarged resources for research equipment and endowed professorships, and the 
addition of the 1.000 acre Centennial Campus occurred during this administration. All of the schools were renamed colleges except 
for the School of Design and The Graduate School. In addition, the School of Education became the College of Education and 
Psychology. 



North Carolina State University 



In 1990, Larry K. Monteith, an alumnus and former Dean of the College of Engineering, became chancellor and NC State's 
eleventh chief administrative officer. Among his early initiatives were the creation of the Division of Undergraduate Studies and the 
First Year Experience Program. In 1992, the College of Management was established, and plans for a freshman college were 
formalized. An Institutional Advancement Division, now known as University Advancement, was organized to include alumni 
relations, university relations, development, and advancement services. A Board of Visitors was created, comprised of nationally 
prominent scholars, and business leaders, to advise the chancellor and Board of Trustees. The College of Textiles and ABB (Asea 
Brown Boveri), NC State's first corporate partner, moved to Centennial Campus in 1991. Since then, the Centennial Campus 
celebrated its 10th anniversary and surpassed the $100 million mark in construction. The Engineering Graduate Research Center is 
the newest building on that campus. In 1994, NC State was authorized to establish the Zeta Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa Society. 

On August 1 , 1 998, Dr. Marye Anne Fox, a chemist and member of the National Academy of Sciences, became NC State 
University's 12th chancellor to assume the duties of the top post at the state's leading science, engineering and technology university. 
Chancellor Fox was the first female to hold this position at NC State. Chancellor Fox focused on building the campus community, 
promoting partnerships, and adopting a business model that works. She cochaired the first National Academy of Sciences symposium 
ever held at NC State and encouraged fijrther growth on the university's Centennial Campus. Chancellor Fox traveled more than 
3,000 miles within the state to visit the hometowns of NC State students. She engaged business and community leaders and NC State 
alumni to leam more about the citizens' needs and the vital role of NC State in North Carolina's economic growth and success. 

Mission of North Carolina State University* 

The mission of North Carolina State University is to serve its students and the people of North Carolina as a doctoral, research- 
extensive, land-grant university. Through the active integration of teaching, research, extension and engagement. North Carolina 
State University creates an innovative learning environment that stresses mastery of fundamentals, intellectual discipline, creativity, 
problem solving, and responsibility. Enhancing its historic strengths in agriculture, science, and engineering with a commitment to 
excellence in a comprehensive range of academic disciplines. North Carolina State University provides leadership for intellectual, 
cultural, social, economic and technological development within the state, the nation, and the world. 

*Approved by the UNC Board of Governors on September 14. 2001 

Campus 

NC State University is located west of downtown Raleigh on 2,240 acres. The campus acreage includes Centennial Campus on 1,130 
acres and West Campus at 400 acres. The College of Veterinary Medicine and the stadium/arena complex are located on the West 
Campus. Nearby are research farms; biology and ecology sites; genetics, horticulture, and floriculture nurseries and forests that 
comprise an additional 2,700 acres. Elsewhere across the state are research farms, 4-H camps and a research forest for a total of 
101,500 acres. 

Research Triangle 

NC State is one of the three Research Triangle universities along with Duke University in Durham and the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. Within the 30 mile triangle formed by the three universities is the 7,000-acre Research Triangle Park, the 
location of many public research agencies and private research centers of national and international corporations. 

Faculty 

The university has approximately 7,400 employees, including 1,975 instructional faculty. Among the many honors and recognitions 
received by members of the faculty are ten memberships in the National Academy of Sciences and ten memberships in the National 
Academy of Engineering, one member of the Institute of Medicine, and over 400 members of the Academy of Outstanding Teachers. 

Teaching and Research 

The university is organized into ten colleges, the Graduate School, and the Division of Undergraduate Affairs. The colleges are 
Agriculture and Life Sciences, Design, Education, Engineering, Humanities and Social Sciences, Management, Natural Resources, 
Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Textiles, and Veterinary Medicine. These colleges offer baccalaureate degrees in 1 00 fields, 
master's degrees in 106 fields, and doctoral degrees in 60 fields. Together with more than 59 research centers and institutes, these 
colleges also support a broad spectrum of more than 4,000 sponsored scholarly endeavors. 

Outreach and Extension Program 

As the state's only research university in the land-grant tradition. North Carolina State has a unique mission to serve the citizens of 
North Carolina through technical assistance, professional development, lifelong education, technology transfer, and other means of 
applying knowledge to real world issues and problems. Faculty, students, and staff from every academic college engage in 
collaborative research, learning, and service partnerships with business, industry, government, and communities, in the Triangle 
region and across the state. Extension and engagement imperatives include economic development, environmental stewardship, K-12 
education excellence, and leadership development. NC State Extension and Engagement, which encompasses the ten colleges and 
includes such units as the Cooperative Extension Service, the Industrial Extension Service, the McKimmon Center for Extension and 
Continuing Education, Centennial Campus, and the NC State Economic Development Partnership, reaches more than one million 
North Carolinians annually. 



North Carolina State University 



Students 

In the 2003 Fall Semester, the university's head eount enrollment totaled 29,854. Included in this number were 20,314 students in 
undergraduate degree programs, 5,665 in graduate degree programs, 307 First Professional and 3,568 non degree-seeking students. 
The combined undergraduate and graduate enrollments by college were: Agriculture and Life Sciences - 4,379; Design - 708; 
Education - 1,284; Engineering - 7,085; Natural Resources - 1072; Humanities and Social Sciences - 4,685; Management - 2,663; 
Physical and Mathematical Sciences - 1 ,468; Textiles - 707; Veterinary Medicine - 393, and Undergraduate Aftairs/First Year College 
- 1,516. The student population included 2,920 African American students, 2,378 other minority students and 12,917 female students. 
Students at the university come from 47 states, three United States territories, and approximately 102 foreign countries. The 
international enrollment is a distinctive feature of the institution as nearly 1,505 international students give the campus a 
cosmopolitan atmosphere. 

Associations 

The university is a member of the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges, the American Council on 
Education, the Association of Governing Boards of Investigates and Colleges, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, the North 
Carolina Association of Colleges and Universities, and the Cooperating Raleigh Colleges. 

Accreditation 

North Carolina State University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools 
(1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097: phone number (404)679-450 to award the doctoral, master's, baccalaureate, and 
associate degrees. 

In addition, many of the university's professional programs and departments are accredited by national professional associations, 
including: 

Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care 200 1 

Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology 2000 

American Animal Hospital Association 2003 

American Chemical Society 2002 

American Psychological Association 2002 

American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education 2000 

Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business 2000 
Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs 1998 

Council for Cooperative Program 2002 

Computing Sciences Accreditation Board 1999 

Council on Social Work Education 2003 

Human Factors in Ergonomics Society 1997 

International Association for Continuing Education and Training 2002 

Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board 2002 

National Architectural Accrediting Board 2000 

National Association for Schools of Art and Design 2001 

National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration 2000 

National Collegiate Athletic Association 1995 

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education 2002 

National Recreation and Park Association 2002 

Society of American Foresters 1 994 

Society of Wood Science and Technology 1 994 



Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination Policy 

It is the policy of the State of North Carolina to provide equality of opportunity in education and employment for all students and 
employees. Accordingly, the university does not practice or condone unlawful discrimination in any form against students, 
employees or applicants on the grounds of race, color, religion, creed, sex, national origin, age, disability, or veteran status. Nor does 
the university allow discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, with respect to internal university matters that do not 
contravene federal or state law and do not interfere with the university's relationships with outside organizations, including the 
federal government, the military". ROTC, and private employers. 



North Carolina State University 



Discrimination based upon race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, or veteran status is in violation of federal and 
state law and North Carolina State University policy, and will not be tolerated. 

Retaliation against any person complaining of discrimination is in violation of federal and state law and North Carolina State 
University policy, and will not be tolerated. 

North Carolina State University will respond promptly to all complaints of discrimination and retaliation. Violation of this policy can 
result in serious disciplinary action up to and including expulsion for students or discharge for employees. Disciplinary action for 
violations of this policy will be the responsibility of the dean or director, supervisor, or Office of Student Conduct as may be 
appropriate in accordance with applicable procedures. 

North Carolina State University hereby affirms its desire to maintain a work environment for all employees and an academic 
environment for all faculty and students that is free from all forms of unlawful discrimination and free from discrimination which is 
otherwise prohibited by university policy or regulation. Unlawfiil discrimination is completely incompatible with the values and 
goals of North Carolina State University and will not be tolerated. North Carolina State University strives to maintain an environment 
that supports and rewards individuals on the basis of such relevant factors as ability, merit, and performance. 

Every individual is encouraged, and should feel free, to seek assistance, information, and guidance from their department head, or the 
Office for Equal Opportunity should s/he have questions about the Equal Opportunity and Nondiscrimination Policy. 



For more information, please contact: 

The Office for Equal Opportunity phone: (9 1 9)5 1 5-3 148 

1 Holladay Hall fax:(919)513-1428 

Box 7530, NC State University TTY: (919)525-9617 

Raleigh, NC 27695-7530 www.ncsu.edu/equal_op 



North Carolina State University 



ADMINISTRATION AND OFFICES 

Office of the Chancellor 

Marye Anne Fox, Chancellor 

Clare M. Kristofco, Executive Assistant to the Chancellor and Secretary of the University 

P. J. Teal, Assistant to the Chancellor - Administration 

Andy Willis, Assistant to the Chancellor for External Affairs 

Office of the Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

James L. Oblinger. Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs 

Katie B. Perry, Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs 

Jose A. Picart, Vice Provost for Diversity and African-American Affairs 

Joanne Woodard, Pice Provost for Equal Opportunity and Equity 

Thomas E.H. Conway, Jr., Vice Provost for Enrollment Management and Services 

Denis Jackson, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Extension and Engagement 

Samuel F. Averitt, Vice Provost for Information Technotog}' 

Susan K. Nutter, Vice Provost and Director. NCSU Libraries 

Thomas K. Miller, Vice Provost for Distance Education and Learning Technology Applications 

L. George Wilson, Vice Provost for International AJfairs 

Jo Allen, Interim Vice Provost for Undergraduate Affairs 

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Johnny C. Wynne. Interim Dean and Executive Director for Agricultural Programs 

Kenneth L. Esbenshade, Associate Dean and Director for Academic Programs 

Jon F. Ort, Associate Dean. Cooperative Extension Senice 

Steven Leath. Interim Associate Dean and Director, Agricultural Research Service 

Sulvia Blankenship, Interim Associate Dean for Administration 

Larry A. Nelson. Coordinator of International Programs 

John C. Comwell, Associate Director of Academic Programs. Director of Agricultural Institute 

Barbara M. Kirby, Assistant Director of Academic Programs 

College of Design 

Marvin J. Malecha, Dean 

John Tector, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs 

Fatih Rifki, Associate Dean for Graduate .Academic Affairs 

James D. Tomlinson, Assistant Dean for Research, Extension and Engagement 

Marva Motley, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs 

Dottie Haynes, Assistant Dean for Administration 

College of Education 

Kathryn M. Moore. Dean 

Ruie J. Pritchard, Interim Associate Dean. Academic Affairs 
Samuel S. Snyder, Associate Dean. Research and Graduate Studies 
Anona P. Smith- Williams, Assistant Dean, Student Senices 

College of Engineering 

Nino A. Masnari, Dean 

Richard F. Keltie, Associate Dean. Academic Affairs 

Sarah A. Rajala, Associate Dean. Research and Graduate Programs 

Thomas K. Miller, Associate Dean, Distance Education and Information Technology 

John Strenkowski. Assistant Dean. Research Programs 

Tony L. Mitchell, Assistant Dean, Engineering Student Services 

Jerome P. Lavelle. Assistant Dean. Academic Affairs 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

Linda P. Brady. Dean 

Gail W. O'Brien, Associate Dean. Academic Affairs 

Matthew T. Zingraff, Associate Dean. Research and Engagement 

Randall J. Thomson. Assistant Dean and Director of Undergraduate Programs 

Monica T. Leach, .Assistant Dean for .Academic Affairs and Director of Diversity Programs 

Michael L. Wasu. Assistant Dean. Information Technology' 

Adalia A. "Jessie" Sova, Assistant Dean, Finance and Administration 



North Carolina State University 



Lynda H. Hambourger. Director, Undergraduate Enrollment Management 
Akram F. Khater, Director. International Programs 

College of Management 

Jon Bartley, Dean 

Gilroy Zuckerman, Associate Dean. Academic Affairs 

Steve Allen, Associate Dean. Graduate Programs and Research 

Gail A. Hankins, Assistant Dean. Academic Affairs 

College of Natural Resources 

Larry A. Nielsen. Dean 

Adrianna G. Kirkman, Associate Dean, Academic Affairs 

J.B. Jett, Associate Dean, Research 

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

Daniel L. Solomon, Dean 

Raymond E. Fomes, Associate Dean, Research 

Jo-Ann Cohen, Associate Dean, Academic Affairs 

College of Textiles 

A. Blanton Godfrey. Dean 

David R. Buchanan, Associate Dean, Extension and Applied Research 

William Oxenham, Associate Dean, Academic Programs: Director of Graduate Studies 

Thomas M. Ferguson, Assistant to the Dean, Information Technology 

Melissa Griffith, Director of Development, Assistant to the Dean 

Philip R. Dail, Director of Advising and Admissions 

Kentley B. Hester, Director of Student and Career Senices 

Teresa M. Langley, Student Sen'ices Manager, Director of Textiles Off-campus Programs 

Terry Brasier, Coordinator of Diversity Programs; Director of Student Services 

Honora F. Nerz, Librarian, Burlington Textiles Library 

College of Veterinary Medicine 

Oscar J. Fletcher, Dean 

David G Bristol, Associate Dean and Director, Academic Affairs 

Neil C. Olson, Associate Dean and Director, Graduate Studies and Research 

Michael G. Davidson, Associate Dean and Director, Veterinary Services 

Distance Education and Learning Technology Applications 

Thomas K. Miller, Vice Provost for Distance Education and Learning Technology Applications 

Distance Education Planning and Development 

Rebecca Swanson, Director 
Learning Technology Applications 

Sharon Pitt, Associate Vice Provost and Director 

Diversity and African American Affairs 

Jose A. Picart, Vice Provost for Diversity and African-American Affairs 

African American Cultural Center 

Janet Howard, Interim Director 
Gender Affairs 

Frances Graham, Assistant Vice Provost 
Programs to Enhance Preparations 

Janet Howard, Director 

Division of Enrollment Management and Services 

Thomas E.H. Conway, Jr., Vice Provost for Enrollment Management and Services 

Registration and Records 

Louis D. Hunt, Registrar 
Scholarships and Financial Aid 

Julia R. MaWette. Director: Associate Vice Provost for Scholarships and Financial Aid 



North Carolina State University 



Undergraduate Admissions 

Thomas GrifTin, Director 

Division of Finance and Business 

George Worsley, Vice Chancellor 

Kathryn S. Hart, Treasurer 

Stephen Keto, Associate Vice Chancellor, Resource Management ami Information Systems 

Charles D. Leffler, Associate Vice Chancellor for Facilities 

David Rainer, Associate Fice Chancellor for Environmental Health and Public Safety 

Vacant, Associate Vice Chancellor for Human Resources 

Ernest Murphrey, Executive Director for Financial Services 

Administrative Computing Services 

Mardecia S. Bell, Director 
Benefits 

Yvette McMillan, Director 
Boolistores 

Richard A. Hayes, Director 
Budget Office 

Lisa Clough, Director 
Campus Police 

Tom Younce, Director/Chief 
Casliier and Student Accounts Office 

Bruce Forinash, Director 
Communication Teclinologies 

Jennifer Van Horn, Director 
Construction Management 

Carol Woodyard, Director 
Contracts and Grants 

Earl N. Pulliam, Director 
Employee Relations and Training Services 

Dianne Sortini, Director 
Employment and Compensation 

Terree Kuiper, Director 
Environmental Health and Public Safety 

David Rainer, Associate Vice Chancellor 
Enterprise Information Systems 

Gwen Hazlehurst, Director 
Facilities Operations 

Jack Colby, Director 
Facilities Planning and Design 

Bob Eraser, Director 
Foundations Accounting and Investments 

Jill Tasaico, Director 
Insurance and Risk Management 

Jim Semple, Director 
Materials Support 

Jim Hansen, Assistant Director 
Network and Client Services 

Greg Sparks, Director 
Purchasing 

Robert Wood, Director 
Real Estate 

Howard W. Harrell, Director 
Transportation 

Tom Kendig, Director 
University Accounting Office 

Cliff Flood, Co«/ro//er 
University Architect 

Michael Harvvood 
University Graphics 

Robert Wood, Director 
University Payroll Office 

Brian Simet, Director 

Division of Student Affairs 

Thomas H. Stafford Jr, Vice Chancellor 
Jerry W. Barker, Associate Vice Chancellor 



North Carolina State University 



Evelyn Q. Reiman, Associate Vice Chancellor 
Arthur L. White, Associate Vice Chancellor 
Tim R. Luckadoo, Associate Vice Chancellor 
N. Alexander Miller, III, Associate Vice Chancellor 
Lisa R Zapata, Assistant Vice Chancellor 

Arts Development 

Amy Boiselle, Director 
Caldwell Fellows Program 

Janice E. Odom, Director 
Campus Activities 

Deb Luckadoo, Director 
Campus Recreation 

Peter Kay, Director 
Carmiciiael Facilities and Operations 

Dawn Sanner, Director 
Center for Student Leadership, Ethics and Public Service 

Michael Giancola, Director 
Center Stage/Arts Outreach 

Sharon Moore, Director 
Chaplains' Cooperative Ministry 

Ann Pearce, Director 
Counseling Center 

M. Lee Salter, Director 
Crafts Center 

James V. Pressley Jr., Director 
Dance Program 

Robin Harris, Director 
Distance Education and Technology Services 

Leslie Dare, Director 
Educational Talent Search 

Marsha Boyd Pharr, Director 
Gallery of Art and Design 

Charlotte V. Brown, Director 
Greek Life 

John Mountz, Director 
Multicultural Student Affairs 
Tracey Ray, Director 
Music Department 

Robert Petters, Director 
Parents and Families Services 

Jennifer Bell, Coordinator 
Physical Education 

March L. Krotee, Department Head 
Research and Assessment 

Carrie Zelna, Director 
ROTC Units 

Air Force: Jeffery Webb, Commander 
Army; Michael Wawrzyniak, Commander 
Navy & Marine Corps: Calton Puryear, Commander 
Student Conduct 

Paul Cousins, Director 
Student Health Services 

Jerry Barker, Director 

Marianne Tumbull, Coordinator, Health Promotion 
Student Media 

Bradley Wilson, Coordinator 
Talley Student Center 

Donald Patty, Director, Business Office 
University Career Center 

Carol Schroeder, Director 
University Dining 

Arthur L. White, Associate Vice Chancellor 
University Housing 

Tim Luckadoo, Associate Vice Chancellor 

University Scholars Program 

N. Alexander Miller, Director 
University Theatre 

John Mcllwee, Director 



North Carolina State University 



Upward Bound 

Marsha Boyd Pharr, Director 
Women's Center 

Frances Graham, Director 

Division of Undergraduate Affairs 

Jo Allen, Interim Vice Provost 

John T. Ambrose, Assistant Vice Provost 

Roger A. E. Callanan, Interim Senior Director 

Academic Support Program for Student Athletes 

Philip Moses, Director 
Cooperative Education 

Arnold Bell. Director 
First Year College 

John T. Ambrose, Director 
Honors Program 

Richard L. Blanton, Director 
New Student Orientation Program 

Roxanna McGraw, Interim Director 
Transition Program 

Ron L. Mimms, Director 
Tutorial Center 

Melissa Daniel, Director 
Undergraduate Assessment 

Marilee Bresciani, Director 
Undergraduate Fellowship Advising 

Denise Wood, Coordinator 
Undergraduate Research 

George T. Barthalmus, Director 
Virtual Advising Center 

Andrea Irby, Director 

Equal Opportunity and Equity 

Joanne Woodard, Vice Provost for Equal Opportunity and Equity 

ADA and Affirmative Action 

Greg Holden, Assistant Vice Provost, Director 
Disability Services for Students 

Cheryl Branker, Director Disahiiit}- Sei-\'ices for Students 
Equitv and Harassment Prevention Programs 

Rhonda Sutton, Assistant flee Provost and Director 
Outreach and Education 

Beverly Williams, Coordinator 

Faculty Senate 

Dennis M. Daley, Chair of the Faculty 

Honors Council 

R. L. Blanton, Director and Chair 

The Graduate School 

Robert S. Sowell, Dean 
Rebeca C. Rufty, Associate Dean 
Duane K. Larick, Associate Dean 
David Shafer, Assistant Dean 

Information Technology Division 

Samuel F. Averitt, Vice Provost for Information Technology 

Communication Technologies - Network Operations 

Jennifer Van Horn, Director 
Computing Services 

Bill Padgett, Director 



10 



North Carolina State University 



High Performance and Grid Computing 

M laden Vouk, Associate Vice Provost and Director 
ITD Systems 

Alan Galloway, Director 
Technology Support and NC State University Help Desk 

Susan Klein, Director 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

Lee G. Fowler, Director 

International Affairs 

L. George Wilson, Vice Provost for International Affairs 

Office of International Scholar and Student Services 

Michael J. Bustle, Director 
Study Abroad Office 

Ingrid R. Schmidt, Director 

Legal Affairs 

Mary Elizabeth Kurz, Vice Chancellor and General Counsel 

McKimmon Center for Extension and Continuing Education 

Denis Jackson, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Extension and Engagement 

Continuing and Professional Education 

Jud Hair, Director 
Credit Programs & Summer Sessions 

Bobby Puryear, Director 
Center for Urban Affairs and Community Services 

Yevonne Brannon, Director 
Encore Center for Lifelong Enrichment 

Tricia Inlow, Director 
Marketing and Communication 

Scott Cason, Director 

The NCSU Libraries 

Susan K. Nutter, Vice Provost and Director of Libraries 

Office of Research and Graduate Studies 

John G. Gilligan, Vice Chancellor 

Matthew K. Ronning, Associate Vice Chancellor for Sponsored Programs and Regulatory Compliance Services 

Vacant, Associate Vice Chancellor for Technolog}- Transfer 

Steven Lommel, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research Development 

Donna Cookmeyer, Director of the Office of Techno log)' Transfer 

University Advancement 

Terry Wood, Vice Chancellor 

Advancement Services 

Paul Eberle, Associate Vice Chancellor 

Alumni Relations 

Lennie Barton, Associate Vice Chancellor 

Public Affairs 

Deborah Griffith, Associate Vice Chancellor 

University Development 

David Anderson, Associate Vice Chancellor 

University Planning and Analysis 

Karen P. Helm, Director 



North Carolina State University 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



2004 Fall Semester 




August 


18 


Wednesday 


September 


6 


Monday 


October 


7-8 


Thur-Fri 


November 


24-26 


Wed-Fri 


November 


25-26 


Thur-Fri 


December 


3 


Friday 


December 


6-14 


Mon-Tues 


December 


15 


Wednesday 


December 


23-27 


Thur-Mon 


2005 Spring 


Semester 




January 


10 


Monday 


January 


17 


Monday 


March 


7-11 


Mon-Fri 


March 


24-25 


Thur-Fri 


April 


29 


Friday 


May 


2-10 


Mon-Tues 


May 


14 


Saturday 


2005 First Summer Session 




May 


23 


Monday 


May 


30 


Monday 


June 


24 


Friday 


June 


27-28 


Mon-Tues 


2005 Second Summer Session 


July 


5 


Tuesday 


August 


5 


Friday 


August 


8-9 


Mon-Tues 


2005 Fall Semester 




August 


17 


Wednesday 


September 


5 


Monday 


October 


6-7 


Thur-Fri 


November 


23-25 


Wed-Fri 


November 


24-25 


Thur-Fri 


December 


2 


Friday 


December 


5-13 


Mon-Tues 


December 


14 


Wednesday 


December 


23-27 


Fri-Tues 



NOTE: Dates in this publication are those that have 
printing (May 2004). Changes may be announced in 
maintained online. 



First day of classes 

Holiday (Labor Day); university closed 

Fall break 

Thanksgiving vacation; no classes 

Thanksgiving holiday; university closed 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 

Fall graduation exercises 

Winter holiday; university closed 

First day of classes 

Holiday (Martin Luther King, Jr. Day); university closed 

Spring break; no classes 

Spring holiday; no classes 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 

Spring commencement 

First day of classes 

Holiday (Memorial Day); university closed 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 

First day of classes 
Last day of classes 
Final examinations 

First day of classes 

Holiday (Labor Day); university closed 

Fall break 

Thanksgiving vacation; no classes 

Thanksgiving holiday; university closed 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 

Fall graduation exercises 

Winter holiday; university closed 

been approved by appropriate agencies of the university at the time of 
official university publications subsequent to this printing and 



12 



North Carolina State University 



ACADEMIC DEGREES AND PROGRAMS 

Undergraduate Degrees 

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

agricultural business management: agricultural and environmental technology, agricultural and extension education; agronomy; 
animal science; applied sociology; molecular and structural biochemistry; biological engineering; biological sciences; biomedical 
engineering; botany; criminology; environmental sciences; fisheries and wildlife sciences; food science; horticultural science; 
microbiology; natural resources; poultry science; zoology 
Preprofessional Programs - pre-dental, pre-medical, pre-optometry and pre-veterinary 

College of Design 

architecture (fifth year program); environmental design in architecture; art and design; graphic design; industrial design; landscape 
architecture 

College of Education 

education, general studies; business and marketing education; mathematics education; middle grades education with concentrations 
in language arts and social studies or mathematics and science; science education; technology education 

College of Engineering 

aerospace engineering; biological engineering; biomedical engineering; chemical engineering; civil engineering; computer 
engineering; computer science; construction engineering and management; electrical engineering; environmental engineering; 
industrial engineering; industrial engineering furniture manufacturing; materials science and engineering; mechanical engineering; 
nuclear engineering; paper science and engineering; textile engineering 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

anthropology; arts applications; communication; criminology; English; English education option: French; French education option; 
history: multidisciplinary studies; philosophy; political science; psychology; religious studies; science, technology and society; social 
studies education options; social work; sociology; Spanish; Spanish education option 

College of Management 

accounting; business management; economics 

College of Natural Resources 

environmental science hydrology; environmental technology; fisheries and wildlife; forest management; natural resources; parks, 
recreation, and tourism management; professional golf management; paper science and engineering; wood products 

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

chemistry: environmental sciences; geology; marine sciences; mathematics; meteorology; natural resources; physics; statistics 

College of Textiles 

textile chemistry; textile engineering; textile and apparel management; textile technology 

Preprofessional Programs 

Coordinator of Pre-Law Services 

Law schools neither prescribe nor recommend a particular undergraduate curriculum for prospective candidates. A student may 
prepare for law school by a careful use of electives within any of the baccalaureate curricula offered by the nine undergraduate 
colleges. The Coordinator of Pre-Law Services for the university, in conjunction with the student's academic advisor, assists any 
student with an interest in law with selection of appropriate electives and concentrations. The Coordinator also works with the Pre- 
Law Student's Association (PLSA) which is open to all interested students. During the year the PLSA provides programs which have 
included: local attorneys. Law School students. Law School Directors of Admission, information on the admissions process. At this 
time, the Pre-Law Advising Program is administratively housed within the Division of Undergraduate Affairs. For fijrther 
information, consult Mary A. Tetro, Coordinator of Pre-Law Services, 57 Tucker Hall, (919)515-5830. 

Pre-Medicine, Pre-Dentistry, and Pre-Optometry Programs 

Health professional schools seek bright, broadly educated students from any four-year undergraduate curriculum offered at NC State 
University. Thus, students should choose a departmental major which suits their interests and talents and which would prepare them 
for an alternative career should they not be accepted into one of the professional schools. 

The program of study should provide a strong foundation in the natural sciences (biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics), 
highly developed communication skills, and a solid background in the social sciences and humanities. 

The University Preprofessional Health Sciences Review Committee 

This committee assists students in preparing applications and providing evaluations to professional schools. For further information, 
consult Professor John Roberts, committee chainnan or the program associate, Nancy Cochran, (919)515-5978. Detailed 
preprofessional information may be viewed online at: ceres.cals.ncsu.edu/preprof_guide. 



13 



North Carolina State University 



Pre-Veterinary Program 

This area of study is a non-degree option otVered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. This option is available to students 
majoring in animal science, poultry science, zoology, or biological sciences as well as in many other science curricula, such as 
biochemistry or chemistry. If a student is accepted to veterinary medical school before completion of their undergraduate degree, 
some course credits may be transferable from the veterinary program toward completion of the Bachelor of Science degree. 
Arrangements for this procedure should be made with the degree granting school or department prior to entering veterinary college. 
For further infonnation, contact the Academic Programs Office of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. (919)515-2614, or 
the Admissions Office for Veterinary Students of the College of Veterinary Medicine. (919)513-6205. for general information 
concerning admission to the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program at NC State. 

Undergraduate Minors 

Some departments at NC State offer undergraduate minors for students wishing a systematic program of study in an area outside their 
major. All minors require at least 15 credit hours and may be either departmental or interdepartmental. Courses within the minor 
program may be used to satisfy any of the general requirements, including free electives, of a major curriculum. Minors are 
completely optional, the only requirement being that a student may not minor in the same discipline as their major. Students pursuing 
a minor must consult with a minor adviser on a plan of work and must file a copy of this plan with their major adviser at least one 
semester before graduation. Satisfactory completion of the minor will be noted on the final transcript following graduation. For an 
up-to-date listing of minors available at NC State, please see the following web site: www.ncsu.edu/advising_central/minors.html 



Accounting 

Africana Studies 

Agricultural & Environmental Technology 

Agricultural Business Management 

Agroecology 

American Literature 

Animal Science 

Anthropology 

Apparel Technology 

Applied Sociology 

Architecture 

Art and Design 

Arts Studies 

Biological Sciences 

Biotechnology 

Botany 

Business Management 

Chemical Engineering 

Chinese Studies 

Classical Greek 

Classical Studies 

Coaching Education 

Cognitive Science 

Computer Programming 

Creative Writing 

Criminology 

Crop Science 

Design 

Design Studies 

Economics 

English 



Entomology 

Environmental Science 

Environmental Toxicology 

E.xtension Education 

Feed Milling 

Film Studies 

Fitness Leadership 

Food Science 

Forest Management 

French 

Furniture Manufacturing 

Genetics 

Geology 

German 

Graphic Communications 

Graphic Design 

Health, Medicine, & Human Values 

History 

Horticultural Science 

Industrial Design 

Industrial Engineering 

Intemational Studies 

Italian Studies 

Japanese 

Japan Studies 

Joumalism 

Languages and Culture 

Law and Justice 

Linguistics 

Materials Science and Engineering 

Mathematics 



Meteorology 

Microbiology 

Military Studies 

Music 

Nutrition 

Outdoor Leadership 

Parks. Recreation. &Tourism Management 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Science 

Poultry Science 

Psychology 

Pulp and Paper Technology 

Religious Studies 

Russian Studies 

Science. Technology, and Society 

Social Work 

Sociology 

Soil Science 

Spanish 

Statistics 

Technical & Scientific Communication 

Technology Education 

Textile Chemistry 

Textile Technology 

Theatre 

Wetland Assessment 

Women's and Gender Studies 

Wood Products 

World Literature 

Zoology 



14 



North Carolina State University 



Agricultural Institute 

Admission to tliis two-year program requires the completion of a North Carolina State University Undergraduate Admissions 
application, a high school diploma or equivalent, a minimum high school grade point average of 2.0, and one letter of 
recommendation from a responsible citizen, not a relative, attesting to the prospective student's integrity and character. An Associate 
of Applied Science degree is awarded. Fields of study are; 

Agribusiness Management 

Agribusiness Management (Horticulture Concentration) 

Field Crops Technology 

General Agriculture 

Livestock and Poultry Management 

Ornamentals and Landscape Technology 

Pest Management Technology (Agricultural and Urban Concentration) 

Turfgrass Management 

Graduate Degrees 

Consult the Graduate Catalog at the NC State University Graduate School web site - www.fis.ncsu.edu/grad_catalog/catalog.htm or 
the Graduate School for information on graduate programs and admissions procedures: Graduate School, 103 Peele Hall, Box 7102, 
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7102, (919)515-2872. 

Arts Studies 

NC State offers a rich variety of courses in the history, analysis, and production of the arts - dance, film, music, theatre, and visual 
arts. Many of these courses are open to students without prerequisite, and are offered by 13 departments in four different colleges of 
the university. 

In addition to these courses, most of which focus on a single art form, the Arts Studies Program offers special topics courses, each of 
which deals with several arts media or with the arts in connection with science and technology; information about these courses, 
which change each year, is available from the Office of Arts Studies. 

For students who want to concentrate in Arts Studies, a major in Arts Applications is available. It is administered by the Arts Studies 
Program in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. In addition, there are minors in Arts Studies, Music, Theatre, Design and 
Film Studies. 

Opportunities for students to participate in arts activities include many instrumental and choral organizations, student productions in 
University Theatre, craft instruction and facilities in the Craft Center, the NC State Computer Music Studio, and the exhibitions of the 
Visual Arts Program. For these activities, many of which are integrated with academic courses, see Student Activities in this section 
of the catalog. 

The Arts Studies Program together with the Music Department sponsors the Arts Now Series. The Series includes performances of 
and lectures about contemporary performance works that include music. Guest perfonners, composers, dancers, and video artists 
appearing in the series range from regionally based artists to international guests from Europe and South America. 



HONORS AND SCHOLARS PROGRAMS 

University Honors Program 

The University Honors Program at NC State University provides a unique academic opportunity for a select group of academically 
outstanding students. Designed to cultivate the next generation of knowledge builders and creative talents, it will broaden 
experiences in and out of the classroom and position students for admission to graduate and professional schools, for excellent jobs, 
and for prestigious national scholarships. The University Honors Program demands critical thinking, an interest in problem solving 
and teamwork, a desire to think "out of the box," and the drive to attain an intellectual global perspective across disciplines. Based on 
specific selection criteria, students are invited to apply for admission to the University Honors Program. 

Honors students take fiill advantage of NC State's outstanding faculty who are recognized by their department and by students as 
being among the most talented teachers and researchers on campus. Most are also recognized nationally and internationally as 
prominent leaders in their disciplines. Four required interdisciplinary Honors Seminars (12 credit hours), adapted for only 20 to 25 
Honors students, are built upon discovery-, inquiry-, and creativity-based learning paradigms. The seminars encourage students to 
explore the sources of the knowledge being taught (Who discovered/created the work and by what means'?), the impact of the 
discovery/art form on past and contemporary societies (Why and to whom does the work matter?), the ethical and religious issues 
consequential to the work (How does the work fit into what others or I believe?), and the responsibilities that researchers/artists have 
in generating something new (Is all knowledge taken as good?). 



15 



North Carolina State University 



Honors students must complete a minimum old credit hours of Honors Undergraduate Research/Independent Study that culminates 
in a creative project or thesis. Students work vv ith an NC' State faculty mentor (or a scientist/artist/writer outside NC State) on the 
research/creative project. Students are required to present the results of their work at the NC State Undergraduate Research 
Symposium or another symposium or e.\hibit appropriate to the discipline of the scholarly work. Both independent and collaborative 
work is encouraged throughout the program. 

In addition to the seminars, the University Honors Program offers a variety of workshops to prepare students for their ( 1 ) Disciplinary 
Honors research- creative project and the oral or poster presentation of the work. (2) application for admission to graduate or 
professional schools, (3) application for employment and special academic awards, (4) application to study abroad or conduct 
research/creative projects at national institutes and centers, and/or (5) application for national scholarships and fellowships. 

Honors students are invited to reside in the Honors Village, an interactive, learning-while-living community, located on East Campus 
along with the new Honors Program Office, a new dining hall, and Thompson Theatre. The Honors Student Governing Board 
provides a variety of free cultural, educational and social events for all Honors students. Honors advisers help students develop a 
four-year Honors Plan of Study, which will allow students to take advantage of such opportunities as study abroad, internships, or 
research while completing their degrees in an organized and timely manner; and they otTer advice on admission to graduate and 
professional schools, national scholarship opportunities, or career development resources on campus. 

Students invited into the University Honors Program at NC State have a full four years of Honors opportunities open to them, 
depending on their major. In the first two years students participate in four Honors Seminars and various workshops. Students in the 
junior and senior years get more deeply into the subject of their major through participation in Honors in the Discipline (see list of 
available college programs) and the diverse honors courses, graduate courses, seminars and research opportunities available. Students 
not invited into the University Honors Program as freshmen may apply to enter as sophomores or may enter Honors in the Discipline 
by earning the NC State total grade point average required by their disciplines. 

University Scholars Program 

"Man s mind stretched to a new idea, never goes hack to its original dimension. " -Oliver Wendell Holmes 

Holmes was right, of course, and the University Scholars Program (USP) of North Carolina State University accepts this dictum as a 
challenge: To provide promising, academically talented students with a variety of mind-stretching and unique educational 
experiences, both in and outside of the classroom, and to encourage these outstanding students to perform at the highest level of 
achievement of which they are capable. 

Cosponsored by the Division of Student Affairs and the academic colleges for almost twenty-five years, the USP combines special 
courses offered by the various academic departments with a series of cocurricular and extracurricular opportunities. 

Students in the USP may enroll in special sections of courses offered by departments for University Scholars and other high- 
achieving students. These sections frequently have lower enrollments and are taught by instructors known for their excellence in 
teaching. All of these classes fulfill requirements for graduation from NC State, thus students are not required to take additional 
courses in order to participate in the USP. To ensure that University Scholars are able to register for their required Scholars Forum 
and these special courses, USP participants receive "Scholars Advanced Scheduling" privileges. 

Academic work in the Scholars Program is complemented and enriched by a series of special events called the Scholars Forum. 
These weekly activities are intended to broaden each student's personal, professional, and cultural horizons. Forum events may 
include addresses by major public figures, conversations with distinguished faculty members, debates and discussions on significant 
public issues, and visits to museums and historic sites. They may also include introductions to cultural activities, viewing of 
significant films, and explorations of opportunities open to students for personal growth and foreign study. 

From bluegrass to opera, musical comedy to Shakespeare, and foreign films to international dinners. University Scholars have access 
to a range of cultural opportunities, provided free through the program. Educational field trips extend the outreach of the Scholars 
Forum across North Carolina and into other states. Visits to internationally renowned research centers and local museums, hikes 
through local nature preserves, wafting trips down nearby rivers to investigate local flora and fauna, overnights trips to historic and 
cultural centers (Washington, DC. Charleston. SC. and Richmond. VA. for example) are regularly included as part of the Scholars 
Forum Series. Students may also choose to participate in the USP Book Club or weekly USP Current Events Discussion Series, or 
attend a specially selected USP Film Series. University Scholars also have the opportunity to participate in the USP (3utdoor 
Leadership Experience— trips that combine leadership skills work with rock-climbing, white-water rafting, canoeing, hiking, camping 
and other outdoor activities— as well as internships opportunities available exclusively to University Scholars: the Centennial Campus 
Internships. Kenan Fellows Internships and ARTS NC State Internships. Additionally, the Scholars Council, the student 
representative body for the USP. plans a variety of social activities and special trips for University Scholars, and arranges for USP 
students to participate in worthwhile community service projects. 

To foster community and to promote student learning and socialization. University Scholars are invited and encouraged to live in the 
"Scholars Village" which is located in Sullivan Hall. Identified by University Housing as a "premier" residence hall, Sullivan is the 
home to approximately 550 University Scholars. Located on NC State's West Campus, Sullivan has its own 24-hour Help Desk and 
24-hour computer lab, and is located by the largest dining hall on campus, a campus convenience store, and Lee athletic field. One of 
the most active residence halls on campus. Sullivan is home to award-winning educational, social, and service programming provided 
by the Sullivan Hall Activities Council (SIIAC) and the USP Scholars Council. The University Scholars Program Offices and the 
Scholars Lounge are conveniently located inside Sullivan Hall. 

16 



North Carolina State University 



For more information concerning the USP, contact: University Scholars Program, Box 7316, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 
27695-7316, phone: (919)515-2353, fax: (919)515-7168; e-mail: university _scholars(S),ncsu.edu or visit the University Scholars 
Program web site at: www.ncsu.edu/univ_scholars/. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

University Academic Scholarships for Entering Freshmen 

Park Scholarships. "Americas greatest resource is the youth of the land. An investment in the development of the talents and 
capabilities of highly motivated young men and women is an expression of faith in the future of the State and Nation: it is also a 
public sendee of untold value, through the provision of successive generations of first-rate scientists, scholars, and leaders to serve 
the State and Nation. " - excerpt from proposal to establish the Park Scholarships 

The Park Scholarships were established at NC State in 1996 with a generous grant from the Park Foundation of Ithaca, New York to 
fund an inaugural class of 25 Scholars. The merit-based scholarships are flill, four-year awards covering tuition and fees, room and 
board, textbooks, academic supplies, living expenses, and a stipend for a personal computer. Currently, the award is about $12,000 
per year for in-state students or about $23,000 per year for out-of-state students. 

Park Scholars are selected on the basis of merit, exemplary character, exceptional potential for leadership and the sense of promise 
that they may one day make contributions of enduring importance to the betterment of the human condition. The goal of the selection 
process is to identify young people with demonstrated high achievement and leadership as well as those with unusual aptitudes, 
uncommon talents, and special gifts of creativity or entrepreneurial acumen. You must be a U.S. citizen to be eligible for the Park 
Scholarships. 

Currently about 60 Park Scholarships are awarded per year. Two-thirds of the Scholarships are currently awarded to North Carolina 
residents and one-third to residents of other states. The awards are renewable contingent on high standards for the Scholars' academic 
achievement, commitment to the program ideals and personal conduct. 

North Carolina high schools and selected high schools in other states are invited to endorse up to two of their very best students for 
the Park Scholarships. We request that high schools announce the competition to their best students and that a committee be 
established to select and prepare the Park Scholarship candidates. Interested students should speak to their guidance counselor. Note 
that applications are delivered online directly to the students once high schools have officially endorsed them in the fall. 

Under certain exceptional circumstances there may be students with clearly superior characteristics or achievements who do not gain 
the endorsement of the school but who may be viable candidates for the Park Scholarship, (e.g. an outstanding student who just 
moved and is not well known by the new school faculty and staff.) In these extraordinary cases, such students are welcome to apply 
directly to the Program by visiting the Park Scholarships web site to request an application - www.ncsu.edu/park_scholarships. High 
schools that are not on our mailing list may also have outstanding candidates who may want to request an application. 

The Park Scholarship program has as its namesake an individual synonymous with achievement and success, Roy H. Park '31, a 
native of Dobson, NC. At NC State, Park served as editor of the Technician, the school newspaper. His media interest culminated in 
his establishment of Park Communications, Inc., which owned and operated newspapers and radio and television stations across the 
United States. Roy Park brought great honor to NC State because of his remarkable achievements over a long life of service. 

Caldwell Scholarship Program. John T. Caldwell Alumni Scholarships are funded by the NC State Alumni Association as a tribute 
to John Tyler Caldwell, former Chancellor of NC State. To be considered for Caldwell Alumni Scholarships, students must apply for 
admission by November 1 . Students identified as academically competitive will be invited via e-mail to provide additional 
information for ftirther consideration. 

University Wide Scliolarships. NC State offers competitive scholarships for entering freshmen in an effort to recognize and 
encourage exceptional academic ability and talent. Selection is merit-based and not restricted by major. To be considered for 
University- Wide Scholarships, students must apply for admission by November 1. Students identified as academically competitive 
will be invited via e-mail to provide additional information for further consideration. 

University Need-Based Academic Scholarships. NC State offers scholarships to students who are deemed academically 
competitive, exhibit special talents or characteristics, and demonstrate financial need. Selection criteria may be specific to county of 
residence or major. All students who apply for admission by November 1 and apply for financial aid by submitting the Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by March 1 will automatically be considered for these scholarships. Although not 
required, students may receive early consideration if they submit the CSS Profile Form by December 1. 

NC State Merit Scholarships. NC State is a sponsoring institution in the National Merit Scholarship competition. These 
scholarships recognize outstanding seniors designated as Nafional Merit Finalists with four-year renewable merit scholarships. 
Eligible candidates are finalists who designate NC State as their top college choice and are not offered another type of National Merit 
award. For maximum consideration of scholarship stipends, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) should be 
submitted before March 1. 



17 



North Carolina State University 



Chancellor's Leadership Award. Entering freshmen w lio have finaneial need and demonstrated leadership experience or potential 
are encouraged to apply for this award. Applications may be requested from the NC State Undergraduate Admissions Office. 

College Based Scholarships. Scholarships, funded by alumni, friends of the university, college foundations and industry are 
available to entering freshmen as well as continuing students. Scholarship amounts and criteria vary. Scholarship committees within 
each College are responsible for scholarship decisions. Consult the Dean's OfTice or specific college or department web site to 
determine if a separate application is required. 

Outside Scholarships. NC State encourages students to search for scholarships offered by agencies not affiliated with the university. 
Many organizations otTer awards based on place of residence, background, professional affiliations and/or field of study. Students 
should search and apply for outside scholarships independently. There are many free online scholarships search sites. In addition, 
book listings are available in bookstores and libraries. 

Universitv Academic Scholarships for Continuing Students 

Caldwell Scholarship Program, .lohn T. Caldwell Alumni Scholarships are funded by the NC State Alumni Association as a tribute 
to John Tyler Caldwell, former Chancellor of NC State. The Caldwell Fellows Scholarship, a three-year award otTered to first-year 
NC State students, is one of the few merit scholarships for exceptional students already enrolled at the university. About 20 Caldwell 
Fellows Scholarship recipients are selected in the spring to join 10-15 John T. Caldwell Alumni Scholars selected the previous spring. 
Together, they form an experiential, collaborative learning community known as the Caldwell Fellows Scholarship Program. 

University Need-Based Academic Scholarships. NC State offers scholarships to students who are deemed academically 
competitive, exhibit special talents or characteristics, and demonstrate financial need. Selection criteria may be specific to county of 
residence or major. All students who apply for financial aid by submitting the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by 
March 1 will automatically be considered for these scholarships. 

College Based Scholarships. Scholarships, funded by alumni, friends of the university, college foundations and industry are 
available to entering freshmen as well as continuing students. Scholarship amounts and criteria vary. Scholarship committees within 
each College are responsible for scholarship decisions. Consult the Dean's Office or specific college or department web site to 
determine if a separate application is required. 

Outside Scholarships. NC State encourages students to search for scholarships offered by agencies not affiliated with the university. 
Many organizations offer awards based on place of residence, background, professional atTiliations and/or field of study. Students 
should search and apply for outside scholarships independently. There are many free online scholarships search sites. In addition, 
book listings are available in bookstores and libraries. 



SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

Evening Undergraduate Degree Programs 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers courses toward undergraduate degree programs during the evening hours for 
adult part-time students. Sufficient courses are generally offered in the evening hours to complete majors in English, history, 
multidisciplinary studies, political science, and sociology. For more information, contact the Director of Undergraduate Enrollment 
Management, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Box 8101, NC State, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27695-8101; (91 9)5 15- 
3638. 

Non-Degree Certificate Programs 

Non-degree certificate programs are prescribed sets of regular academic courses which otTer limited but structured continuing 
education opportunities. They are designed expressly for Lifelong Education students. Students enrolled in undergraduate or graduate 
degree programs at NC State are not eligible to participate simultaneously in these certificate programs. Satisfactory completion of 
the prescribed courses is recognized by the issuing of a certificate from the department or college that offers that program. 

Course delivery mechanisms differ by program. Some programs utilize on-campus instruction, while others utilize Internet or 
videocassette delivery. The inventory of available programs changes over time in response to changing continuing education needs. 
The following is a sample of available programs: Computer Programming, Geographic Information Systems, Training and 
Development, Professional Writing, and Textiles. Several programs are designed for students who already possess a bachelor's 
degree. 

For information concerning enrollment requirements and prescribed courses for a particular certificate program, consult the 
department or college offering that program or contact Credit Programs & Summer Sessions; (919)515-2265. 

Supplemental Instruction 

Supplemental Instruction (SI) is offered to students in selected sections of chemistry, mathematics, and physics. SI sessions are 
attended \oluntarily b\ students with a wide range of academic backgrounds and aptitudes. Sessions are open to all students who 
want to improve their understanding of the course material. Three or four sessions are offered at various times each week, usually 
during the late afternoon and early evening. 

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North Carolina State University 



SI sessions give students a chance to get together with peers to compare notes, to discuss concepts, to work problems, and to develop 
strategies for studying the material. The sessions are led by trained university tutors called SI leaders. Leaders are undergraduate 
students who previously excelled in the course and who have been selected for their outstanding communication abilities. The leaders 
attend class, take notes, and do homework assignments in preparation for the SI sessions. 

During the semester, students may attend as many SI sessions as they wish. Session attendance is recorded for use in data analysis 
and program improvement. The data reveals a consistent record of higher grades and lower dropout rates for students who regularly 
attend. Students attending SI at least once a week average half a letter grade higher than students who do not attend. 

For more information, contact the Undergraduate Tutorial Center, 515-3163 or our web site at www.ncsu.edu/tutorial_center/si.html. 

The Peer Mentor Program 

The Peer Mentor Program is a student peer adviser program that targets first-year African American, Native American, and Hispanic 
students. The program recognizes the difficulty most first year students face as they embark upon this new and vastly different 
segment of their lives, and acknowledges the complexity of this situation for minority students, particularly on a predominately white 
campus. The primary objective of the Peer Mentor Program is to ease this situation by contributing to and aiding in the adjustment of 
these students to the academic, emotional and social aspects of college life. From a larger perspective, the program's goals are to 
increase and maintain the enrollment of minority students and to ensure each student realizes his/her own potential. 

African-American, Native American, and Hispanic upperclassmen are selected as mentors through application and interview, and are 
subsequently paired with one to three first year students. The mentor generally maintains close contact throughout the year with his 
or her first year student(s) and acts as a "big brother" or "big sister." Whenever possible, the freshmen are paired with upperclassmen 
who are in the same major and/or college. Through training and personal experience, peer mentors are able to assist first year students 
with any problems or situation that may arise, refer them to the appropriate university resources, and insure a smooth transition from 
high school to college. Though it is impossible to determine the many benefits of this program for each individual, the Peer Mentor 
remains rewarding, both intrinsically and extrinsically. for first year students as well as mentors. This program is coordinated by the 
Department of Multicultural Student Affairs, call (919)515-3835 for more information. 

National Student Exchange Program 

The National Student Exchange Program at NC State offers students a wonderfijl and economical opportunity to study at another 
university in the United States, while retaining full-time status at NC State University. Over 1 70 campuses are available for exchange, 
from Hawaii to Maine. Depending upon the college where they choose to study, students either pay their tuition and fees directly to 
NC State, or they pay tuition and fees at the in-state rate at the campus they are attending. Students may participate in the exchange 
for a semester or academic year. Eligible students must be full-time undergraduates with a 2.75 grade point average or better and be 
selected by a screening committee. For further information contact the National Student Exchange Office in 4130 Talley Student 
Center, (919)513-1820, or visit the following web sites: www.fis.ncsu.edu/nse/ and www.nse.org. 

North Carolina State Caldwell Fellows Program 

NC State offers a self-development experience known as the NC State Caldwell Fellows Program. The program is designed to assist 
outstanding freshmen students develop their leadership potential at an accelerated pace, and to accomplish this in ways not usually 
afforded by the university. Each year approximately 30 new freshmen are selected to participate in the program as Caldwell Fellows. 
They receive a stipend that approximates in-state tuition and fees, as well as the opportunity to apply for additional support for 
leadership and self-development activities. The program seeks to identify students of exceptional ability and motivation and to 
encourage their development as potential leaders for business, governmental, educational and other professional communities. The 
program attempts to fulfill its goal by providing training and developmental opportunities. 



NC STATE INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES 

International Students 

The Office of International Scholar and Student Services is charged with meeting the immigration advising and cross-cultural 
programming needs for the university's 2,000 international students and J-1 Exchange Visitor scholars who come from more than 100 
different countries. Services provided by OISSS include advising students and scholars on immigration regulations and university 
policies; authorizing certain types of on or off-campus employment authorization for F-1 and J-1 visa holders; and providing cultural 
programs designed to enrich the cultural and academic experience of international community: New International Student 
Orientation, Culture Corps, 1-SSERV volunteer program, English Conversation Club, cultural diversity workshops, and other 
programs. New international students are required to participate in New International Student Orientation and to check-in with 
OISSS upon arrival. 

International applicants must apply to the Admissions Office by the stated deadlines and must meet all the necessary requirements for 
admission. In addition, international applicants must meet certain language and financial criteria (see the TOEFL and Financial 
Information sections under Freshman Admission). 



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Outline of minimum immigration requirements for F-i and J-1 students; 

Keep all immigration documents cuirent (passport and 1-20 or DS-2019) 

Maintain full-time enrollment every semester (12 hours/semester for undergraduates) 

Make good academic progress toward your degree 

Do not work or intern ofTcampus without prior written approval from OISSS 

Do not work on campus more than 20 hours in any one week during the semester 

Update any address change in TRACS 

Update OISSS immediately of any change in name, visa status, or marital status 

Consult with an OISSS advisor BEFORE changing curriculum/majors, withdrawing, dropping below full-time, transferring to 

another school/program, etc.. 

Purchase and maintain the NC State University Student Health and Accident Insurance 

Be sure to keep your passport and recently signed visa certificate (1-20 or DS-2019) with you when you travel abroad. Consult 

with an OISSS advisor about visa and travel questions 

Further information about immigration requirements and restrictions are detailed on the OISSS web site. For individual advising, 
please call 515-2961 to make an appointment with an advisor. 

Office of International Scholar and Student Services (OISSS) phone: (919)515-2961 

320 Daniels Hall, 101 Stinson Drive, e-mail: oisss(2/)ncsu.edu 

Campus Box 7222, web site: www.ncsu.edu/oisss/ 
Raleigh, NC 27695-7222 

Summer Institute in Englisli for Spealcers of Other Languages 

The Summer Institute in English for Speakers of Other Languages is a five-week, intensive English language program for students 
from other countries. It is especially good for students from other countries who intend to pursue university studies or specialized 
training programs in the United States in the fall. The institute, which is jointly sponsored by the Department of Foreign Languages 
and Literatures and the Division of Continuing Education, is held from early July to early August each summer. It is designed to 
provide students with intensive instruction and practice in the use of the English language. Emphasis is on developing integrated oral 
and written skills in English. 

The institute also offers orientation to American life and institutions to give students insight into life in the United States and to help 
them to adjust to the new environment. There are films and field trips to places of historic, cultural, and scenic interest. 

Prospective students usually have studied English and have some experience with spoken English prior to enrolling in the institute. 
However, all levels from beginners to advanced are welcome. 

Admission to the institute does not imply admission as a degree candidate at NC State or any other campus of the University of North 
Carolina System. 

The TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) is administered to students who wish to take it at the end of the program. Since 
this is an institutional administration of the test, scores are only accepted by the Admissions Office and Graduate School at NC State. 
For information, contact Jessica Wahler at (919)513-1938 or Jessica wahler^ncsu.edu 

Alexander International Program 

Each year, students from an average of 20 countries worldwide enter the university through the Office of Study Abroad. The majority 
of these students are assigned to Alexander International Hall for their term (semester or year) at North Carolina State University. 
Additionally, many degree-seeking international students choose to live in Alexander during their tenure. Roommates (one 
international student and one American student) are paired to live together. The majority of residents in Alexander International Hall 
are upper class and graduate coed students. 

Residents in Alexander International Hall represent more than 20 countries. This makes for a very rich and diverse culture within the 
hall. It is typical to find many students cooking native foods and conversing in native languages while educating others about their 
cultures. Resident Advisors (RAs) and Hall Council members are active in planning programs that encourage resident participation, 
such as cultural dinners and international film festivals. International and American residents are usually very eager to share their 
cultures and learn about other traditions. 

Program activities in past years have included an international dinner and international coffeehouse series, emphasizing customs, 
foods, and entertainment from various cultures. Workshops on cultural differences, cross cultural communication and relationships, 
international employment opportunities, and overseas studies are regularly included in the annual calendar of programs and activities. 
These activities provide an opportunitv for American students to add an international dimension to their education while attending 
NC State. 

Participation in this international program is selective and based upon potential contributions to the program. Students are expected to 
be active participants, to initiate programming, and to be supportive of the program goals. Students interested in applying or wishing 
additional information should inquire at 105 Alexander International Hall. (919) 515-3078. 

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Study Abroad 

The Study Abroad Office assists students who would like to study, do an academic internship, volunteer, or work in another country. 
Opportunities are available for the summer, semester, or year, and many programs cost about the same as studying at NC State. The 
Study Abroad Office administers approximately $100,000 in campus-based scholarships for study abroad each year, in addition to 
national scholarship competitions such as Fulbright. Students may also use their financial aid to study abroad. 

Study Abroad Programs 

Study programs abroad allow students to take course work overseas in their major and/or minor field, and/or fulfill general education 
requirements. Programs are available for the summer, the semester, or the year. Most programs have no foreign language 
requirement. The Study Abroad Office will also assist students who wish to study on a program sponsored by another university or 
organization to obtain academic credit for such programs. NC State sponsored study abroad options include: 

NC State Exchange and University of North Carolina Exchange Programs are available in Asia, Australia, Europe, North 
America and South America. Students on these exchanges pay regular NC State tuition. Room and board costs are paid to the 
host institution, but are typically very similar to those at NC State. Requirements include a GPA of at least 2.75 (some exchanges 
require a 3.00) and at least intermediate level (through 202) language proficiency for programs in which the language of 
instruction is not English. 

International Student Exchange Program (ISEP) sites are available in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America and 
South America. Students on these exchanges pay regular NC State tuition, room and board costs. Requirements include a GPA of 
at least 2.75 (more competitive sites require a higher GPA) and at least intermediate level (through 202) language proficiency for 
programs in which the language of instruction is not English. 

Non-exchange study abroad programs are available in Ghana (West Africa) and Spain. Students on these programs pay a set 
program charge, which covers the cost of tuition, housing, excursions, insurance, and meals. Requirements include a GPA of at 
least 2.75 and completion of at least the 202 level of Spanish for the Spain program. 

NC State Group Study Abroad Programs, directed by NC State faculty, are offered during the summer every year, and 
sometimes during spring/fall breaks or the semester. There are over 20 NC State Programs offered each summer. Students on 
these programs pay a set program fee, which generally covers tuition, housing, some meals, and excursions, although the details 
vary from program to program. Eligibility requirements vary, but many programs are open to students in good academic standing 
(2.0 GPA) who have completed the freshman year. Students typically earn 3 or 6 hours of credit on summer programs. The 
programs below are scheduled for Summer 2004. For the full list of programs for the current year contact the Study Abroad 
Office, Box 7344, study_abroad(§ncsu.edu or see the web site www.ncsu.edu/studyabroad. 

Africa 

DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA. This program provides a wonderful opportunity to study in KwaZulu-Natal, the most 
culturally diverse region in South Africa, for a five-week period. Students have the opportunity to experience Zulu history, 
language and culture, issues of politics, policy and community service, and the rise of art, architecture and film in modem 
Southern Africa, as well as ideology and identity. Additionally, students have the opportunity to take part in a credit-bearing 
service learning course, with visits to urban and rural environmental and development projects. 

ARUSHA, TANZANIA, EAST AFRICA. This intensive 5 week program in Arusha, Tanzania offers two three credit hour 
courses: African Culture and Society, and Globalization and Pan Africanism: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. 
Classroom lectures are supplemented by trips to various sites in the region, including the Serengeti, Masai villages, local 
schools and markets, and Zanzibar. All students receive introductory courses in the "KiSwahili" language. Arusha is located 
on the slopes of Mt. Meru and in close proximity to Mt. Kilimanjaro. 

GHANA, WEST AFRICA. There are two additional programs to Ghana, Africa that run every other year and are scheduled 
to run for 2005. One of these courses focuses on Art & Design and the other on Humanities. Please see the Study Abroad 
Office web site for fiiU details. 

Asia 

NEW DELHI, INDIA. This is a five-week program in Hindi Language and Indian Culture where students attend courses, 
taught by NC State faculty, on the campus of Jawaharlal Nehru University on the outskirts of the city. The literature and 
culture courses are taught in English. The political capital of an enormous, diverse nation. New Delhi is a cosmopolitan city 
with world class shopping, restaurants, and historical monuments. The program will include excursions to Bombay, Goa, 
Agra and Jaipur. No previous study of Hindi is required. 

CHINA AGRO STUDY TOUR. This program is a unique study opportunity for undergraduates interested in agriculture and 
life sciences to study Chinese agriculture and culture. Places visited in the tour include Shanghai, Hangzhou, Wuhan, 
Tianjin, Beijing, Hong Kong, and many others. Students earn 3 hours of credit in ALS Special Topics. 

Americas 

CARRIACOU, GRENADA. Located in the Caribbean, this program will teach students the fundamental skills required of 
archaeologists when conducting survey and excavation. NC State students work closely with students from Great Britain 
and the Netherlands to collect, examine and record cultural remains from sites on the island, while enjoying the beauty of 
the Caribbean. Students earn 6 credits in anthropology. 

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CUERNAVACA, MEXICO. This language and culture immersion program is located 70 miles south of Mexico City in the 
city ofCuemavaca, called the City of Eternal Spring because of its mild sunny climate. Students live with Mexican families 
and attend the Center for Linguistic and Multicultural Studies. Included in the program are day trips to places of historic and 
contemporary interest, in addition to an overnight excursion to Taxco and Acapulco. 

LAKE ATITLAN, GUATEMALA ANTHROPOLOGY. This is a 7-week program of intensive ethnographic fieldwork 
focusing on the problems of sustainable eco-tourism in Guatemala. During the program, students spend time living with 
Guatemalan families in the Lake Atitlan area of the Western Highlands. The focus is on ethnographic methods and learning 
about the socio-cultural and economic issues surrounding Guatemala's tourism industry. Courses are taught in English. 

LAKE ATITLAN, GUATEMALA SOCIAL WORK. Students will enhance their provision of social work services to Latino 
clients through learning Spanish language, culture and social service responses and solutions in Guatemala. During the 
program, students live with a Guatemalan family in the Panajachel area. In addition to course work earning up to 6 credit 
hours, students spend time each week in a hand's on service learning/research experience working in a governmental, 
neighborhood or community organization. 

CUZCO/LIMA, PERU. This six-week program begins with a twelve-day travel study focusing on the Incan and colonial 
heritage of Peru, including visits to Macchu Picchu and Cuzco. The travel study is followed by four weeks of study in Lima. 
There, students will live with local families and make several field trips to surrounding areas. Six credit hours are available 
in Spanish literature and Latin American studies. 

Europe 

AIX-EN-PROVENCE, FRANCE. The three week program in Aix-en-Provence offers three hours of course credit for BUS 
464: International Marketing. The program has two prerequisites: BUS 360: Marketing Methods, and FLF 101 : Elementary 
French, or its equivalent. Aix is famous for its grand boulevard - the Course Mirabeau - and open squares that feature 
bustling markets in the mornings and outdoor bistros and cafes in the afternoons and evenings. Located 20 minutes from the 
Mediterranean Sea, Aix enjoys long, sun-drenched summer days. The course is taught in English. 

FLORENCE, ITALY. This program is sponsored by the University Scholars Program. The magical, historic city of Florence 
is the backdrop for students to explore topics in history, architecture, philosophy, politics, artistic movements and civic life 
of the Italian Renaissance period. Six credits are available through a variety of courses including art history, studio art, and 
Italian language, taught in English by the outstanding faculty at the Lorenzo de Medici Institute. The course "Italian 
Renaissance Civilization and Culture" is required for all participants. 

IRELAND/SCOTLAND AGRO STUDY TOUR. This program is a unique study opportunity for undergraduates interested 
in agriculture and life sciences to study Irish and Scottish agriculture and culture. Places visited in the tour include Dublin, 
Galway, Belfast, and more. Also included are visits to dairy, wild boar, and poultry farms. Students earn 2 hours of credit in 
ALS Special Topics. 

LILLE, FRANCE. This 5 1/2-week program begins with a travel study through northern France, with visits that include the 
Paris, Loire Valley chateaux, Mont-St. Michael, Versailles, Chartres, and the D-Day beaches of Normandy. The program 
then continues for four weeks at the Catholic University of Lille, where students live with French families. Students take one 
language course (beginning, intermediate, or advanced French) and one French civilization course for a total of six credit 
hours; previous study of French is not required. 

LONDON, ENGLAND. This program provides American-style university-level classroom instruction in the heart of 
London. NC State professors teach an arts course focusing on the arts, architecture, music and theater of London and a 
second course either in literature or history, which rotates every year. Students reside and study at Canterbury Hall, a 
University of London residence hall located in the Bloomsbury section, within walking distance of the British Museum, 
Charles Dickens House, and the theater district. 

OXFORD, ENGLAND. This program offers courses entitled "Shakespeare", "Art Treasures of Oxford", and "Britain since 
1930", all taught by British instructors. Students reside and study in St. Benet's Hall, a permanent private hall of Oxford 
University. A country town and industrial center, Oxford is best known as the seat of Oxford University. England's oldest 
university, and is celebrated for tradition, academic excellence and beautiful architecture. 

POZNAN, POLAND. This 4-week program is designed for Biotechnology majors/minors and offers courses in Animal Cell 
Culture Techniques and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in Structural Genomics and Proteomics. A course in Polish history is 
also offered. Located on the Warta River in west-central Poland, Poznan is a major cultural and literary center. Students are 
housed and take courses at the Adam Mickiewicz University (AMU), which allows NC State students ample opportunity to 
interact with local university students. Scheduled excursions include Krakow. Auschwitz, and Warsaw. 

PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC. Located in Prague, one of Europe's most beautiful and historic cities, this 6-week program 
offers credit hours from the College of Design. International studio courses are offered in Landscape Architecture & Urban 
Design, Architecture, and Art and Design. The Art & Design studio offers workshops in lithography, intaglio and poster 
design, as well as a course on Animation. All courses are taught in English. 

ROSTOCK. GERMANY. This three-week program offers a unique individualized research opportunity for students 
interested in Science. Engineering and Technology. A variety of cultural activities are planned that include weekend visits to 
Berlin and Hamburg and other important historical sites. Social activities involve opportunities for interaction with 

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counterpart Gernian students. Courses are taught in English and students enroll in Contemporary Science, Technology and 
Human Values and/or Structure and Properties of Engineering Materials. 

SEGOVIA, SPAIN. The Segovia program is designed for engineering majors/minors. Segovia, a small city 55 miles 
northwest of Madrid, has a unique historical mixing of diverse cultures. It is an ideal setting for students who are 
considering the relationship between technology and culture and in finding their place in our global society. Classes 
encourage the ability to use the Spanish language in authentic settings and allow students to study and experience the rich 
culture of Spain. Students take two courses for a total of six credit hours. 

SPAIN AGRO STUDY TOUR. This program is a unique study opportunity for undergraduates interested in agriculture and 
life sciences to study Spanish agriculture and culture. Places visited in the tour include Madrid, Seville, Valencia, Barcelona, 
and more. Also included are visits to olive, orange, wheat and sunflower fields, fruit processing plants, and an orange 
museum. Students earn 3 hours of credit in ALS Special Topics. 

VIENNA, AUSTRIA. This four-week program in the heart of Europe offers students a chance to use the city itself as a 
living classroom. German language courses at the 200 and 300 level are offered, along with two additional courses, both of 
which fiilfill General Education Requirements and are taught in English: International Law, and Arts, Ideas and Values. 
Excursions include trips to Wachau in the spectacular Danube Valley and Zisterizien Serabtei Stift Heiligenkreuz, the oldest 
monastery in the world. An overnight trip to the province of Styria is also planned. 

The NC State Study Abroad Summer Programs vary by year and some programs may not be listed here as they are offered every 
other year. For the most up to date information, please visit our web site at www.ncsu.edu/studyabroad. 

Volunteer and Work Abroad Programs 

In addition to the academic programs listed above, the Study Abroad Office can provide information about a wide variety of 
volunteer and paid work options around the world in which students may wish to participate. 



ADMISSION 

The "Early Action" freshman application deadline is November 1 . "Early Action" applicants will receive a response by early January 
but still have until May 1 to confirm enrollment plans. The freshman application priority deadline for the Fall Semester and Summer 
Sessions is February 1 ; the transfer student priority is April 1 . Freshmen are strongly encouraged to apply during the fall of the senior 
year in high school. Applications for the Spring Semester should be submitted prior to November 1 . All applicants for the College of 
Design must submit applications by December 1 . The College of Design does not admit students in the spring. Each applicant must 
complete an application form which may be obtained from high school counselors or by writing to: 

Director of Admissions 

Box 7103 North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7103 

A non-reflindable $55 fee must accompany the completed application. 

We highly recommend that students apply online at: www.ncsu.edu/uga. 

Freshman Admission 

Admission to the university is competitive, and it is possible to be admissible to some programs but not all programs at NC State. 
Applicants are asked to indicate their first and second choices for a curriculum, including undeclared majors within a college, or, if 
undecided, to indicate their choice of participating in the First Year College. Applications which are not admissible in the first 
curriculum choice will be reviewed for admissibility in their second curriculum choice. Transfer between programs after a successfiil 
first year may be possible. The admissions decision is based primarily on the evaluation of the high school record, including the level 
and difficulty of the courses taken, the overall grade point average, rank in class, and scores on the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) 
or the American College Testing Program (ACT). Extracurricular involvement and leadership are also considered. These factors are 
reviewed with the curriculum choice to determine admissibility as a freshman at NC State. 

In addition, the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina System has determined that the minimum undergraduate 
course requirements for all constituent institutions, including NC State, shall include a high school diploma or its equivalent and the 
following course units taken in high school: 

1. Six course units in language, including 

• Four units in English 

• Two units in a language other than English 

2. Three course units of mathematics in any of the following combinations: 

• Algebra I and II, and Geometry 

• Algebra I and II, and one unit beyond Algebra II or 

• Integrated Math I, II, and III 

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3. Three course units in science, including 

• At least one unit in a life or biological science, and 

• At least one unit in physical science, and 

• At least one laboratory course 

4. Two course units in social studies, including 

• One unit in U.S. history 

• One other unit in social studies 

Beginning with the freshman class entering in the fall of 2006. an additional unit of mathematics beyond Algebra II or Integrated 
Math III will be required as well. It is recommended that every student lake a foreign language course and a mathematics course in 
the senior year. Any additional entrance requirements for admission to NC State will be set forth in the Freshman Admissions 
Bulletin for that year. The faculty members of the University Undergraduate Admissions Committee must approve any exceptions to 
the university admission requirements. 

Applicants are accepted on either junior or senior test scores, although senior scores are recommended, especially if the applicant is 
also applying for financial aid or scholarships. An interview is not required and does not weigh in the admissions decision; a 
prospective student is always welcome to visit the Admissions Office, 1 12 Peele Hall. The Admissions Office conducts freshman 
information sessions every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 10:30am and on Tuesday and Thursday at 1 :30pm. Campus tours led 
by students are conducted each weekday, weather permitting, at 12:20pm on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and at 2:30 on 
Tuesday and Thursday, leaving from the Talley Center fountain. 

Two- Year Agricultural Institute 

Requirements for admission to the Agricultural Institute, a two-year terminal program, include graduation from an accredited high 
school with a 2.0 minimum grade point average or successful completion of the high school equivalency examination administered 
by the State Department of Public Instmction. The application should include either a copy of high school records or a letter 
indicating the applicant has passed an equivalency examination. SAT scores are not required. Course work is not transferable to the 
four-year degree programs. Completion of course work in the Agricultural Institute leads to an Associate of Applied Science ( A.A.S.) 
degree. (See College of Agriculture and Life Science). 

Standardized Test Scores 

Applicants for admission as freshmen must submit scores from the College Board Assessment Tests (SAT) or the American College 
Testing Program (ACT). Students should request that their scores be sent directly from the testing service to NC State. (SAT Code 
#5496, ACT code #3 164) Information booklets and applications forms may be obtained from school counselors or by writing directly 

to the testing services: 

SAT address: The College Board ATP 
Box 592 
Princeton, New Jersey 08541 

ACT address: ACT Records Department 
P.O. Box 451 
Iowa City. Iowa 52243-045 1 

SAT II (Achievement Tests) 

Although not required for admission, freshman students must present SAT II Mathematics Subject Test scores to ensure proper math 
placement at NC State. Students should take the Level II-C test. 

Advanced Placement (AP)/International Baccalaureate (IB) 

A student may qualify for advanced placement by one or more of the following means: ( I ) by passing a proficiency examination 
administered by a teaching department at NC State: (2) by attaining a score of 700 or higher on the verbal portion of the SAT: (3) by 
meeting a specific minimum score on certain of the Advance Placement Program (AP) or IB examinations: and (4) by attaining a 
minimum score on certain of the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) subject tests. 

Out-of-State Students 

Undergraduate applicants from outside North Carolina may be required to meet more competitive standards for admission than North 
Carolina residents. NC State is limited to accepting not more than 18 percent of total new undergraduate students from outside the 
state. 

Transfer Students 

NC State welcomes transfer applicants, and in recent years, more than 25 percent of our graduates started their college programs at 
other institutions. A transfer student should present at least 30 semester hours (or 45 quarter hours) of "C" or better college level 
work, including an English class and a college level math class applicable to the degree program. Transfer admission is competitive, 
and the grade point average may very depending on the requested program of study. Additional specific course work is required for 
some programs. Transfer students must be eligible to return to the last institution previously attended and must submit individual 
transcripts from each institution. 



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Students who graduated from high school since 1990 must submit a high school record to verify that they have met minimum 
admissions requirements for course work as outlined in the Freshman Admissions section of this catalog. Exceptions to this 
requirement are students who will have earned an A.A., A.S., or A.F.A. degree before enrolling at NC State. Individuals who do not 
have the minimum admissions requirements at the high school level must complete at the college level six semester hours or nine 
quarter hours each of English, foreign language, mathematics, science, and social science to be eligible to transfer. 

Previous college transcripts are evaluated for credit that is transferable to the university as part of the admission application review. A 
grade of "C" or better is required before a course may be considered for credit. The college to which the application is made will 
determine the exact amount of credit applicable toward a degree at NC State. 

International students are carefiilly screened for evidence of English language proficiency, adequate financial backing and academic 
credentials indicating potential for success. 

International Students 

Applicants who are not citizens of the U.S. must complete and submit the "International Application For Undergraduate Admission," 
fee, and related application materials directly to the Admissions Office at NC State University. 

TOEFL 

Applicants whose native language is other than English must submit TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) scores as 
evidence of their ability to use English at a level of competence necessary for university course work. A minimum score of 213 is 
required for the computer-based TOEFL exam. Some departments may have higher score requirements. (See www.ets.org for 
information on test dates and localities.) 

Financial and Immigration Information 

All accepted applicants will receive a letter of provisional acceptance and a Certificate of Financial Responsibility (CFR). In 
addition, accepted applicants who are already in the U.S. will also receive a Visa Clearance Form (VCF). Those applicants seeking a 
F-1 or J-1 student visa must complete the Certificate of Financial Responsibility. The purpose of this form is to certify financial 
solvency for the student throughout his/her program of study. For more information on the CFR, please see the CFR Instruction Page 
in the OISSS web site - www.ncsu.edu/oisss/admissions/cfrinstructions.html. Applicants who receive the VCF must provide proof of 
their current nonimmigrant status. This includes those individuals who are Permanent Residents of the U.S. (Once OISSS receives 
proof of the permanent residency. Permanent Residents will no longer be considered international students.) Applicants who are 
already in the United States in a nonimmigrant visa category other than F-1 or J-1 (ex: Permanent Residents, H-4, F-2, J-2, E-2, etc.) 
are not required to complete and return the CFR, unless they plan to change to F-1 or J-1 student status (if eligible). Applicants 
currently in the U.S. in another nonimmigrant status who wish to change to F-1 or J-1 status will need to consult with an OISSS 
advisor to discuss change of status options. Please do not send financial statements or immigration documents to the Admissions 
Office or OISSS before they are requested. Please consult the Admissions web site or the OISSS web site for the published deadlines 
by which all CFR and VCF forms must be submitted to OISSS. International applicants who cannot submit the CFR and VCF by the 
deadline or who are not able to obtain a visa and enter before the academic term begins may have to re-apply for a later term. 

Upon receipt of the CFR and, if appropriate, the VCF, OISSS will review the document(s) for approval. If the information provided 
by the applicant is incomplete or not duly supported by proper documentation (e.g. sponsor and bank official signatures, bank 
statements, etc.), the applicant will be notified that his/her documents were not approved and why. Initial notification is done via 
e-mail, then regular airmail if necessary. The applicant will then have an opportunity to correct the problem(s) and resubmit the 
form(s). Once OISSS approves the financial, and if necessary, visa clearance, documents, OISSS will notify the appropriate 
admissions office that the applicant has been cleared for official full acceptance. Applicants can check the status of their applications 
directly with the Admissions Office. OISSS will prepare the appropriate Certificate of Eligibility (Form 1-20 or Form DS-2019) and 
mail it to the applicant, along with the full Admission Letter, and other important pre-arrival information. The applicant at this point 
is considered fully admitted to the university. New international students must check-in with OISSS upon arrival to campus. 

For more information regarding the issuance of visa certificates or obtaining a visa, changing nonimmigrant status, transfer for 
international students, SEVIS, etc., please contact OISSS, e-mail: oisss(S}ncsu.edu; phone; (919)515-2961; web site: www.ncsu.edu/ 
oisss/admissions/index.htm 

320 Daniels Hall, 101 Stinson Drive, Campus Box 7222, Raleigh, NC 27695-7222 

Unclassified Students 

Unclassified students are those working for credit within a college but not enrolled in a degree-granting program. Admission as an 
unclassified student requires the recommendation of the dean of the school in which the student wishes to enroll. Unclassified 
students must meet the same entrance requirements as regular degree students and must meet the same academic requirement to 
continue. If at a later date, unclassified students wish to change to regular status, their credits will be evaluated in terms of the 
requirements of their intended curriculum. 

Lifelong Education Students 

The Lifelong Education student classification is designed for individuals who have not been formally admitted into a degree program 
at the university but who wish to enroll in courses offered by the university. Lifelong Education students are limited to a maximum 
course load of two courses plus one physical education course each semester or Summer Session. 

25 



North Carolina State University 



Lifelong Education student applications should be made through Credit Programs & Summer Sessions, at the McKimmon Center, 
comer of Western Boulevard and Gorman Street. If Lifelong Education students wish to become undergraduate degree candidates at 
a later date, they must make application through the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and are encouraged to make an 
appointment with that otFice to discuss entrance requirements. Lifelong lulucation students wishing to become graduate degree 
candidates must make application through the Graduate School and should consult the Graduate Administrator in the chosen field of 
study for advice or clarification of information. 

Servicemen's Opportunity Colleges 

NC State has been designated as a member of the Servicemen's Opportunity Colleges (SOC) General Registry - a network of 
institutions sponsored by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities and the American Association of Community 
and Junior Colleges. Servicemen are encouraged to take college level courses ofiered by accredited institutions and made available to 
military personnel through SOC. Transcripts must be sent to the Director of Admissions directly from the institution offering the 
course. Servicemen should submit an application for admission not more than one year before desired date of entry as a degree 
candidate. 

College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

The College-Level Examination Program® or CLEP is a national credit-by-examination program that provides students with the 
opportunity to demonstrate college-level achievement through a program of exams in undergraduate college courses. By proving 
satisfactory knowledge of a test subject, credit for corresponding college courses can be granted. There are approximately 1,400 
CLEP Test Centers across the United States. You should select the Test Center most convenient for you and contact them directly for 
information regarding registration, fees, test dates, parking, etc. For detailed information about CLEP, available exams and Test 
Center locations contact the College Board at: 

45 Columbus Avenue 
New York, NY 10023 
phone: (212)713-8000 
web site: wwvv.collegeboard.com/clep/ 

For information about the exams and required scores accepted by NC State and the corresponding NC State course credit granted, 
please refer to the following web site: www.ncsu.edu/uga/placemen.htm. 

Graduate Students 

Regulations governing graduate admission are outlined in the Graduate Administrative Handbook. To view the Graduate 
Administrative Handbook, go to the NC State University Graduate School web site at www.fis.ncsu.edu/grad_publicns/handbook/ 

New Student Orientation 

Leazer Hall 

Roxanna S. McGraw, Interim Director 

The mission of New Student Orientation is to provide newly admitted first year and transfer undergraduate students introductory 
assistance and continuing services that will aid in their transition to NC State. Our programs expose students to broad education 
opportunities, academic expectations and resources, as well as social and developmental opportunities. Most importantly, we begin 
the process of integrating students into the life of the institution. As a component of the Division of Undergraduate Affairs, the Office 
of New Student Orientation is also committed to providing leadership to enhance programs that respond to student transition needs. 

Required Immunization Documentation 

North Carolina state law requires all new enrollees in the university system to present proof of immunization to protect you and 
others while you are at NC State. 

Verified proof of immunization against rubella, measles, tetanus, and diphtheria must be presented to Student Health Services no later 
than the first day of classes. A PPD skin test within 12 months of the first day of class is required for international students. Please 
note that under North Carolina regulations, a student must be dropped from his or her classes if immunization requirements are not 
met and a SlOO charge levied for re-enrollment. For assistance, contact Student Health Services, (919)515-7233. 



REGISTRATION 

Registration is conducted either by using the web TRACS LINK - www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/ or by phone (919)515-NCSU. A 
Schedule of Courses is available for each semester prior to the beginning of the registration period. This contains all necessary 
instructions for completing registration. 

Registration consists of three steps: ( I ) meeting with advisers to determine course requirements and to obtain a Personal 
Identification Number (PIN); (2) registering for courses using the TRACS system; and (3) paying tuition and fees and all other debts 

26 



North Carolina State University 



to the university by the established deadlines. Advising and registration dates and deadlines are published each semester and Summer 
Session. 



phone: (919)515-2572 

fax:(919)515-2376 

e-mail: rr_comments@ncsu.edu 

web site: www.ncsu.edu/reg records 



For more information, contact: 

Department of Registration and Records 
1000 Harris Hall 
Box 7313, NC State University 
Raleigh, NC 27695 

Cooperative Registration Programs 

Two registration programs were developed for the purpose of fostering cooperative educational activities. Under these programs 
students have the opportunity to register for courses at other institutions and to participate in cooperative library arrangements and 
joint student activities. For more information see: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/ii_title.html 

Inter-institutional Registration Program 

Under the Inter-institutional Registration Program, any degree student enrolled in at least eight credit hours may register for courses 
at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Duke University, North Carolina 
Central University or the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Inter-institutional Program registration forms are available from 
the Department of Registration and Records, 1000 Harris Hall, and require signatory approval from the student's adviser and college 
Dean. 

Cooperating Raleigh Colleges 

Any degree student enrolled in at least eight credit hours may register for courses at one of the Raleigh colleges: Meredith College, 
Peace College, St. Augustine's College, or Shaw University. CRC registration forms are available from the Department of 
Registration and Records, 1000 Harris Hall, and require signatory approval from the student's adviser and college Dean. 

Schedule Revision (drops and adds) 

Note: NC State University policies, rules and regulations are updated and reviewed as the need arises. For the most current 
information regarding this section, please visit the following web site: www.ncsu.edu/policies/academic_affairs/pols_regs/ 
REG205.00.3.php. 

Courses may be added during the first week of a regular semester without permission of the instructor and during the second week 
with the permission of the instructor. 

Courses may be dropped without regard to course load during the first two weeks of a regular semester. During weeks three through 
six of a semester, full-time undergraduate students who wish to drop courses at any level and whose academic load would thereby fall 
below the twelve hour minimum course load may do so only for documented medical reasons or other verified, unforeseen grounds 
of personal or family hardship. 

Exceptions to the drop policies require the recommendation of a student's adviser (or the departmental coordinator of advising or the 
departmental head) and approval by the student's dean. 

Students who wish to drop all courses for which they are enrolled, must withdraw from the university for the remainder of the 
semester or Summer Session in which they are enrolled. A degree student who finds it necessary to drop all courses will initiate 
withdrawal from the university at the Counseling Center, Student Health Center, 28 1 5 Cates Avenue, second floor. 



NC STATE TUITION AND FEES 

Note: Since tuition and fees for the 2004-2005 school year were not approved by the publication date, the rate schedules listed 
below represent estimated rates. These rates are subject to change. For the most current information available, please see the 
following web site: www7.acs.ncsu.edu/cashier/tuition_index.htm. 

North Carolina Resident - $1,985.00 per semester (effective 2004-2005 academic year) 

Nonresident - $7,909.00 per semester (effective 2004-2005 academic year) 

A statement of tuition and fees is mailed to each pre-registered student before the beginning of any terni. The statement must be 
returned with full payment or complete verifiable financial aid information by the due date appearing on the statement. Normally, the 
due date is two weeks before classes begin. Non pre-registered students will be billed for their tuition and fees plus late fees during 
the next Cashier's Office billing cycle. Fees are the same for both residents and nonresidents and are required of all students. 
Nonresident students are required to pay an additional $5,642 per semester for tuition. 



27 



North Carolina State University 



Estimated Annual Undergraduate Expenses 



Tuition and Fees 


First Semester S 


econd Semester 


Full Year 


NC Residents 


$ 1.985.00 


$ 1,985.00 


$ 3,970.00 


Out of State Residents 


$ 7,909.00 


$ 7,909.00 


$15,818.00 


Room Rent 


$ 1,960.00 


$ 1,960.00 


$ 3,920.00 


Meals 


$ 1,288.00 


$ 1,288.00 


$ 2,576.00 


Books and Supplies 


$ 400.00 


$ 400.00 


$ 800.00 


Personal Expenses 


$ 600.00 


$ 600.00 


$ 1,200.00 


Transportation - in state 


$ 250.00 


$ 250.00 


$ 500.00 


Transportation - off campus/out of state 


$ 500.00 


$ 500.00 


$ 1,000.00 


Total Tuition and Fees 








NC Residents 


$ 6,483.00 


$ 6,483.00 


$12,966.00 


Out of State Residents 


$12,657.00 


$12,657.00 


$25,314.00 



NOTE: 

1 . Tuition and fees are fi.xed items of cost 

2. Room rent is shown as main-campus, double occupancy rate 

3. Meals, books and supplies, other personal expense, and transportation are shown as estimates 

Expenses Other than Tuition and General Fees 

Application Fee: A nonrefundable fee of $55 must accompany each application for admission. 

Room Rent: New incoming students receive room reservation instruction in the letter of acceptance. Continuing students receive 
room reservation information each January at their residence hall rooms. The 2004-2005 charge for room rent ranges from $1495.00 

to $1835.00 per semester. 

Meals: During their first academic year, new freshmen electing to reside on campus are required to participate in one of the 
university's available meal plans. Meal plan costs in 2004-2005 range from $710 to $1,360. Other students pay for meals individually 
at the various dining facilities available both on and near the campus. 

Books and Supplies: Books and supplies are usually purchased during the first week of classes directly from the Students Supply 
Stores. Allow approximately $400 per semester for purchasing books and supplies. 

Personal Expenses: Personal expenses vary widely among students but the estimate of $600 is based on what students report that 
they spend on these items. 

Administrative Management Fee: A special administrative management fee of $250 per semester and $150 per Summer Session is 
required from a contracting agency sponsoring international students whose programs are coordinated through the university's Office 
of International Visitors. 

Cooperative Education Program Fee: Required of all participating co-op students for each semester in which they are enrolled in 
an off campus work assignment. This fee, set at $338 for the 2004 Fall Semester, the 2005 Spring Semester, or the combined 2004 
Summer Sessions, is used for partial support of the Cooperative Education Program staff in job development and placement 
activities. Students paying this fee are entitled to all university services, facilities, and programs during the semester or combined 
Summer Sessions for which they are enrolled. 

College of Engineering Computing Fee: All students enrolled in the College of Engineering, both graduate and undergraduate, will 
be billed a $45 per semester fee to support the Engineering Computing Facility. Payment of the fee will provide students with access 
to standalone workstations which comprise the Engineering Computing Facility. 

Engineering students who enroll in a co-op work session will not be billed for the Computing Fee unless they also enroll in NC State 
courses. 

Required Fees 

Required fees are levied for services, facilities, and programs available to all students whether or not the student takes advantage of 
them. Students are assessed fees based on the course load they are taking. An itemization of required fees and other detailed 
information concerning expenses or related data can be obtained by contacting the University Cashier's Office, NC State, Box 7213, 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7213, (919)515-2986 or at the following web site: www7.acs.ncsu.eduycashier/tuition_index.htm. 

28 



North Carolina State University 



Refund Policy 

Refunds for official withdrawals from NC State University are prorated based upon the percentage of the enrollment period attended. 
No refunds are made for official withdrawals after 50 percent of the period. The prorated withdrawal schedule for each semester is 
publicized through university media after it is established. In some instances, circumstances justify the waiving of rules regarding 
refunds. An example might be withdrawal because of sickness. Students have the privilege of appeal to the Fee Appeals Committee 
when they believe special consideration is merited. Applications for such appeals may be obtained from the University Cashier's 
Office, 2005 Harris Hall or at the following web site: www7.acs.ncsu.edu/cashier/forms index.htm 

Residence Status for Tuition Purposes 

The basis for determining the appropriate tuition charge rests upon whether a student is a resident or a nonresident for tuition 
purposes. Each student must make a statement as to the length of his or her residence in North Carolina, with assessment by the 
institution of that statement to be conditioned by the following. 

Residence. To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes, a person must become a legal resident and remain a legal resident for at least 
twelve consecutive months immediately prior to classification. Thus, there is a distinction between legal residence and residence for 
tuition purposes. Furthermore, twelve months legal residence means more than simple abode in North Carolina. In particular, it 
means maintaining a domicile (permanent home of indefinite duration) as opposed to "maintaining a mere temporary residence or 
abode incident to enrollment in an institution of higher education." The burden of establishing facts which justify classification of a 
student as a resident entitled to in-state tuition rates is on the applicant for such classification, who must show his or her entitlement 
by the preponderance (the greater part) of the residentiary information. 

Initiative. Being classified a resident for tuition purposes is contingent on the students seeking such status and providing all 
information that the institution may require in making the determination. 

Parents' Domicile. If an individual, irrespective of age, has living parent(s) or court appointed guardian of the person, the domicile 
of such parent(s) or guardian is, prima facie, the domicile of the individual; but this prima facie evidence of the individual's domicile 
may or may not be sustained by other information. Further, non-domiciliary status of parents is not deemed prima facie evidence of 
the applicant child's status if the applicant has lived (though not necessarily legally resided) in North Carolina for the five years 
preceding enrollment or registration. 

Effect of Marriage. Marriage alone does not prevent a person from becoming or continuing to be a resident for tuition purposes, nor 
does marriage in any circumstance insure that a person will become or continue to be a resident for tuition purposes. Marriage and the 
legal residence of one's spouse are, however, relevant information in determining residentiary intent. Furthermore, if both a husband 
and his wife are legal residents of North Carolina and if one of them has been a legal resident longer than the other, then the longer 
duration may be claimed by either spouse in meeting the twelve month requirement for instate tuition status. 

Military Personnel. A North Carolinian who serves outside the State in the armed forces does not lose North Carolina domicile 
simply by reason of such service, and students from the military may prove retention or establishment of residence by reference, as in 
other cases, to residentiary acts accompanied by residentiary intent. In addition, a separate North Carolina statute affords tuition rate 
benefits to certain military personnel and their dependents even though not qualifying for the in-state tuition rate by reason of twelve 
months legal residence in North Carolina. Members of the armed services, while stationed in and concurrently living in North 
Carolina, may be charged a tuition rate lower than the out-of-state tuition rate to the extent that the total of entitlements for 
application tuition costs available from the federal government, plus less than the out-of-state tuition rate for the pertinent enrollment. 
A dependent relative of a service member stationed in North Carolina is eligible to be charged the in-state tuition rate while the 
dependent relative is living in North Carolina with the service member and if the dependent relative has met any requirement of the 
Selective Service System applicable to the dependent relative. These tuition benefits may be enjoyed only if the applicable 
requirements for admission have been met; these benefits alone do not provide the basis for receiving those derivative benefits under 
the provisions of the residence classification statute reviewed elsewhere in this summary. 

Grace Period. If a person ( I ) has been a bona fide legal resident, (2) has consequently been classified a resident for tuition purposes, 
and (3) has subsequently lost North Carolina legal residence while enrolled at a public institution of higher education, that person 
may continue to enjoy the in-state tuition rate for a grace period of twelve months measured from the date on which North Carolina 
legal residence was lost. If the twelve months ends during an academic term for which the person is enrolled at a State institution of 
higher education, the grace period extends, in addition, to the end of that term. The fact of marriage to one who continues domicile 
outside North Carolina does not by itself cause loss of legal residence marking the beginning of the grace period. 

Minors. Minors (persons under 1 8 years of age) usually have the domicile of their parents, but certain special cases are recognized by 
the residence classification statute in determining residence for tuition purposes. 

a) If a minor's parents live apart, the minor's domicile is deemed to be North Carolina for the time period(s) that either parent, 
as a North Carolina legal resident, may claim and does claim the minor as a tax dependent, even if other law or judicial act 
assigns the minor's domicile outside North Carolina. A minor thus deemed to be a legal resident will not, upon achieving 
majority before enrolling at an institution of higher education, lose North Carolina legal residence if that person ( 1 ) upon 
becoming an adult "acts, to the extent that the person's degree of actual emancipation permits, in a manner consistent with 
bona fide legal residence in North Carolina" and (2) "begins enrollment at an institution of higher education not later than 
the fall academic term following completion of education prerequisite to admission at such institution." 

29 



North Carolina State University 



h) It'a minor has lived tor live or more consecutive years with relatives (other than parents) who are domiciled in North 

Carolina and if the relatives have functioned during this time as if they were personal guardians, the minor will be deemed a 
resident for tuition purposes for an enrolled term commencing immediately after at least five years in which these 
circumstances have existed. If under this consideration a minor is deemed to be a resident for tuition purposes immediately 
prior to his or her eighteenth birthday, that person on achieving majority will be deemed a legal resident of North Carolina of 
at least twelve months duration. This provision acts to confer in-state tuition status even in the face of other provisions of 
law to the contrary; however, a person deemed a resident of twelve months duration pursuant to this provision continues to 
be a legal resident of the State so long as he or she does not abandon North Carolina domicile. 

Lost but Regained Domicile. If a student ceases enrollment at or graduates from an institution of higher education while classified 
as a resident for tuition purposes and then both abandons and re-acquires North Carolina domicile within a twelve month period, that 
person, if he or she continues to maintain the reacquired domicile into re-enrollment at an institution of higher education, may re- 
enroll at the instate tuition rate without having to meet the usual 12-month durational requirement. However, any one person may 
receive the benefit of this provision only once. 

Change of Status. A student admitted to initial enrollment in an institution (or permitted to enroll following an absence from the 
institutional program which involved a formal withdrawal from enrollment) must be classified by the admitting institution either as a 
resident or as a nonresident for tuition purposes prior to actual enrollment. A residence status classification once assigned (and 
finalized pursuant to any appeal properly taken) may be changed thereafter (with corresponding change in billing rates) only at 
intervals corresponding with the established primary divisions of the academic year. 

Transfer Students. When a student transfers from one North Carolina public institution of higher education to another, he or she is 
treated as a new student by the institution to which he or she is transferring and must be assigned an initial residence status 
classification for tuition purposes. 

Note: General Statue (G.S.) 116143.1 is the prevailing statute governing residence status classification. Copies of the 
applicable law and of the implementing regulations are available for inspection in the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 
112 Peele Hall. This information is subject to change. 



NC STATE FINANCIAL AID 

To be considered for assistance by the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid, a student and his or her parents must complete the 
federal government's Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) available from high school guidance offices as well as the 
NC State OfTice of Scholarships and Financial Aid. This form must be submitted to the federal student aid processing center for 
evaluation of the family's ability to pay for educational expenses. Students who submit FAFSAs to the federal processor by March I 
are considered on-time applicants and are given first priority for need-based scholarship and grant consideration. In addition to the 
FAFSA, entering freshmen are encouraged to complete the College Scholarship Service's PROFILE application in the fall of their 
senior year in high school and have the results of that application sent to NC State. The PROFILE application provides early need 
analysis infomiation needed by the university in making early scholarship commitments for which need and merit are factors. 

By completing the FAFSA, undergraduates are given consideration for all forms of federal financial assistance, including the Federal 
Pell Grant, as well as most types of state and institutional financial aid (except for departmental and university merit awards, which 
may require separate applications). Most financial aid awards are made based on the applicant's financial need, satisfactory academic 
progress, and timely submission of the FAFSA. Determination of the applicant's need is based on estimated educational costs as 
established by the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid and a consideration of the family's financial strength, as determined by 
the analysis of the FAFSA. 

Aid is available on a non-discriminatory basis to all qualifying students. Financial aid awards are usually made in the form of 
"packages" which consist of a combination of gift aid (scholarships and grants), loans, and/or campus employment through the 
Federal Work-Study program. These aid packages include aid from all sources, including the federal government, state and 
institutional funds, and private entities. Students must reapply for aid each year, and renewal is based on continued financial need as 
well as satisfactory academic progress as defined by the Policy on Salisfactoiy Academic Progress for Financiul Aid Eligibility - 
www7.acs.ncsu.edu/flnancial aid/pdf/satprorv.pdf 

A brochure giving a detailed explanation of the aid application and financial aid award process, as well as t>'pes of aid 
available, may be obtained from the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid, 2016 Harris Hall, (919)515-2421. 

Other Types of Scholarships and Financial Aid Services 

Short-term Loans. Short-term loans are available in small amounts (usually not exceeding $100) to fiill time students with previous 
good payment records. These loans are generally approved one day and distributed the following day, and are intended to provide 
financial assistance to meet unexpected expenses. Short-term loans generally must be repaid within 30 days or by the end of the term, 
whichever comes first. 

Student Employment Service. The Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid coordinates an employment service to assist students 
with information about part-time academic year or summer employment possibilities. No particular academic or financial 

30 



North Carolina State University 



qualifications are required to obtain jobs on or off campus. (Note: Federal Work- Study jobs are need-based and are not included in 
this listing). A current listing of job openings is maintained by the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid and under student 
employment at www.ncsu.edu. 

NC STATE STUDENT HOUSING 
Residence Halls 

The university operates twenty residence halls across campus for almost 7,000 residents. A variety of residential options are available 
to accommodate diverse student interests and needs. The residence halls offer single gender and coed options in buildings ranging in 
age from Watauga Hall (1906) to Wood Hall (1983). Each hall is different, with amenities such as computer rooms, laundry rooms, 
kitchens, and air conditioning available. For Fall 2004, University Housing will open Wolf Village, a 1200 bed apartment complex 
for upperclass and graduate students. This coed facility features four, single bedroom apartments that come equipped with full 
kitchens, two bathrooms, a living area and washer/dryer unit. The complex features a computer lab, fitness room, classroom and 
campus eatery as well. 

University Housing, in partnership with NC State colleges and academic departments, offers residential living learning villages that 
support our residents in both their intellectual and personal development. Currently, University Housing hosts the following living/ 
learning villages: 

First Year College 

The First Year College Village houses over 300 students in Owen and Tucker Residence Halls. The partnership between the Division 
of Undergraduate Affairs and University Housing has existed since the First Year College began, and the village council will provide 
new opportunities to collaborate. The transformation of that residential program to a living and learning village will provide even 
greater opportunities to serve students through close proximity to Academic Advisors, Resident Mentors, and "linked" courses which 
promote community among the participants. 

Honors Village 

The University Honors Village is comprised of approximately 50 students and is housed in the Quad residence halls of Berry, Becton 
and Bagwell. The Honors Village is a partnership between the University Honors Program and University Housing. Eight mentors 
serve the residents of this village, assisting with all aspects of village life. With the Honors Program headquarters in Clark Hall, the 
Quad environment is a natural fit for this village. The Honors Village residence halls will be fully renovated in the Spring of 2005, 
thus creating an even more attractive environment for this village. 

SAY (Students Advocating for Youth) Education Village 

The Students Advocating for Youth Village was created from a partnership between the College of Education and University 
Housing. Approximately 150 students living on two floors of Lee Hall comprise the SAY Village. While many of the students in the 
SAY Village are education majors, including Teaching Fellows, the village is open to any student who is interested in working with 
youth now or in the future. Five mentors were selected to live in the SAY Village to assist those residents with adjustment to college 
and other such issues 

WISE (Women in Science and Engineering) Village 

The Women In Science and Engineering Village. This village is supported by the College of Engineering, the College of Physical and 
Mathematical Sciences, the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the College of Natural Resources and University Housing. 
Approximately 120 women live on two floors of Lee Hall this academic year. These women represent a variety of disciplines within 
the four colleges. Mentors live in the village to help the freshmen women to get acclimated to NC State and to be academically and 
personally successfial. A program director is employed to administer the program. 

University Scholars Village 

The University Scholars Village is evolving from the long-standing partnership between the University Scholars Program and 
University Housing. The University Scholars Program has resided in Sullivan Hall for nearly 20 years, and currently has over 450 
student residents. We believe that the village model will strengthen this partnership. Administrative council planning this year has 
focused on enhanced integration of living and learning activities within Sullivan Flail and finding ways to share resources. Recent 
discussions have centered on the long-term facilities needs and program planning for the University Scholars Village. 

To be eligible to live in University Housing during the Fall and Spring Semesters, undergraduate students must be enrolled in at least 
nine credit hours, while graduate students must maintain at least six credit hours. Students who need to enroll in fewer hours, or who 
must drop below these minimum requirements during the semester, should contact University Housing to request an exception. In 
certain cases, students may be required to submit a letter of support from their advisor. During the Summer Sessions, housing is 
provided for any enrolled student as space permits. 

For more information about housing, or to see a 360° view of a residence hall room, contact University Housing online at 
www.ncsu.edu/housing/index.php, or visit 1112 PuUen Hall, Box 7315, NC State, Raleigh, NC 27695-7315, or call (919)515-2440. 



31 



North Carolina State University 



Edward S. King Village (ES King Village) 

The university owns and operates 295 apartments (eOlciency, one-bedroom, and two-bedroom units). Kiigibility to live in the Edward 
S. King Village is contingent upon being a full-time student at NC State and one of the following: married and living with a spouse 
and/or children; a single parent living with a child or children for the duration of occupancy; graduate student; married student 
unaccompanied by spouse or children; or nontraditional undergraduate student. 

E. S. King Village statTand the Village Council implement programs and activities for students, spouses, and children. Recreational 
areas, playground equipment, and other facilities have been recently enhanced to support the family community atmosphere. For 
more information about apartment availability, contact ES King Village at (919)515-2430 or visit the web site at www.ncsu.edu/ 
housing/esking\illage 

Off-Campus Housing 

University Housing maintains self-help listings of off-campus apartments, rooms, and houses for rent. These listings are not 
published, but are available in the University Housing Office, 1 112 Pullen Hall, during the hours of 8:00am - 5:00pm, Monday 
through Friday. 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 

Note: NC State University policies, rules and regulations are continuously being updated and reviewed as the need arises. For 
the most current information regarding this section, please visit the Policies, Rules, and Regulations web site at 
www.ncsu.edu/policies/homepage.php 

Academic Advising 

Most regularly enrolled students are assigned for academic advising to a faculty member who is normally a member of the 
department, which is, or is most likely to become, the student's major department. Students who are admitted into programs such as 
the First Year College, the Transition Program, etc. will be advised by professional advisers in those programs who will aid the 
students in the process of selecting an appropriate major. 

Responsibilities of the Student 

Students have the primary responsibility for planning their individual programs and meeting graduation requirements. This involves 
keeping up-to-date with university, college, and department curricular requirements through materials available from the advisers or 
departmental coordinators of advising; keeping informed of academic deadlines and changes in academic policies; and consulting 
with the adviser or departmental coordinator of advising during each registration period, following notification of academic warning 
status, and at other times as needed and required by academic policy; and diligence in attending class and meeting class objectives 
and assignments. 

Responsibilities of the Adviser 

Although students have the primary responsibility for planning their programs, advisers are expected to: be available for conferences 
at appropriate times and places about which their advisees have been informed; provide accurate information about academic 
regulations and procedures, course prerequisites, and graduation requirements; assist students in planning academic programs suited 
to their interests and abilities and their career objectives; discuss with their advisees appropriate course choices in fulfilling 
curriculum requirements as well as possible consequences of various alternative course choices: inform their advisees when the 
advisee's proposed course selections conflict with university academic or curricular regulations; assist advisees w ith following proper 
procedures for such things as e.\ceptions to the course drop deadlines, auditing a course before or after taking it for credit, taking a 
course under the credit by examination policy, registering for 19 more or more credit hours, registering for interinstitutional courses, 
or repeating a course previously passed; refer their advisees for special testing or counseling as needed; assist their advisees in 
considering the appropriateness of academic adjustments where these become necessary in cases of serious injur)' or illness. 

Responsibilities of the Coordinator of Advising 

Each college or department has a coordinator of advising and teaching who is responsible for: assigning, training, and supervising 
faculty advisers; providing up-to-date, printed course and curriculum infomiation for advisers and students; reassigning to another 
adviser any student who so requests, assisting any student who wants to major in the coordinator's area of study but is ineligible at the 
time to transfer into it. Students in this category keep their adviser in the department in which they are enrolled, but consult 
additionally with the coordinator of advising and teaching for the department otTering the curriculum in which they wish to enroll. 
Whenever appropriate, the coordinator will advise students that they should consider alternative curricula. 

Progress Towards Degree 

The objective of NC State University's Progress Towards Degree Regulation is to encourage timely matriculation into a degree 
program and reasonable progress towards graduation. This regulation applies to all NC State undergraduate degree-seeking students 
who entered as first time freshmen or transfer students beginning Fall Semester 2002. Beginning in Fall 2006 all NC State 
undergraduate students regardless of date of entry are subject to the regulation. 

Each student in consultation with their adviser will develop a plan of study that serves as a planning tool for completing degree 
requirements for the major(s) in which the student is matriculated. Students in the First Year College and other undeclared or 

32 



North Carolina State University 



undesignated programs will develop a plan of study for the major(s) in which the student expects to matriculate. The Plan of Study 
can include plans for tailoring the academic majors, minors, and other specialized academic opportunities. 

Enrollment in course work should be consistent with the student's Plan of Study. The Plan requires a minimum enrollment of 12 
credit hours during consecutive semesters until graduation, and the successful completion of at least 24 credit hours of NC State or 
transferable course work each academic year, unless otherwise justified by an approved Plan of Study. All students must be in or 
matriculate into a degree program by the beginning of classes in the first semester that the student has junior status (i.e. 60 credit 
hours earned - criteria established in Classification of Undergraduate Students regulation). 

In order to meet the requirements for satisfactory progress towards degree completion, a full-time undergraduate student classified as 
a freshman must: 

by the end of the first year of enrollment, have on file a registered Plan of Study that serves as a planning tool for completing 
degree requirements for the major(s) in which the students is matriculated, or expects to matriculate or transfer, and 
successfully earn at least 24 credits of NC State or transferable course that is included in the approved Plan of Study each 
academic year. 

Comparable requirements exist for students in their sophomore, junior, and senior years. 

Students who enter NC State as a part-time students or transfer students are also required to develop a Plan of Work in cooperation 
with their adviser. 

Students who fail to meet the requirements for Progress Towards Degree will be placed on Progress Warning Status and will have one 
semester to work with their adviser to develop a specific plan of action that restores "satisfactory progress" status in their current 
major or to transfer or matriculate into an alternative major. Students who fail to meet the requirements for satisfactory progress 
towards degree after one semester on Progress Warning status will not be permitted to enroll as an undergraduate degree-seeking 
student. Such students will be required to apply through the readmission process if they wish to return to degree seeking status. 

For complete details and explanation of the Progress Towards Degree Regulation see the following web site: www.ncsu.edu/policies/ 
academic_affairs/pols_regs/REG205.00.20.php. 

Graduation Requirements 

Students are eligible for graduation when they have completed satisfactorily all the academic requirements of their degree program as 
specified by their major department, their college, and the university. 

NC State requires that, in addition to other university, college, and departmental requirements, all students must have a grade point 
average of at least 2.000, based on all courses attempted at NC State, in order to be eligible to receive a baccalaureate degree. 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 

Minimum credit hours required in a baccalaureate curriculum that has not been designated a five-year program range from 120 to 
128. These are shown for each curriculum. Students may take more hours than the required minimum. 

Lengtii of Time to Graduation 

The normal and expected length of time to graduation is four years (eight semesters) provided the student completes an average of 
slightly more than 16 credit hours each semester (for most curricula) or attends one or more Summer Sessions. 

By action of the N.C. General Assembly, effective with the 1994 Fall Semesters, new students entering any of the sixteen 
campuses of the University of North Carolina system (including NC State), will be assessed a 25 percent tuition surcharge 
once they have attempted more than 140 degree credit hours. (Degree programs at NC State require 128 hours or less for 
graduation.) Courses taken in summer school at any UNC-System campus do not count towards the 140-hour limitation. 
Questions about this policy should be directed to the Department of Registration and Records, (919)515-2572. 

In order to make continuous progress toward graduation, students are encouraged to take full advantage of the university's advising 
and support services. Effective career decision-making and early, deliberate, long-range semester-by-semester planning of courses 
and carefial selection of extra-curricular commitments can provide direction and motivation necessary for effective use of time 
towards graduation. 

Additional factors that may assure a student's continuous progress toward graduation include good academic performance in 
freshman and basic prerequisite courses, advanced placement for introductory courses, and enrollment in Summer Sessions. Students 
are discouraged from taking unrealistic course loads as a means to accelerate their progress toward graduation as this may result in 
poor academic performance. 

Students may take more than eight semesters to complete an undergraduate program at NC State. In some cases this is the result of 
effective decision-making on the part of the student for such things as participation in cooperative education of study abroad 
programs, a decision to be a part-time student with a reduced course load for reasons of health, necessary outside employment, or 
parental responsibilities, or attempting dual degrees, double majors, or academic minors. 



33 



North Carolina State University 



In other cases the length oftinie to graduation may be prolonged beyond the eighth semester as a result of incomplete or inadequate 
secondary school background requiring some additional compensatory, developmental, or prerequisite courses. Poor academic 
performance in the freshman year or early semesters, or late changes in curriculum could also impact time to graduation. 

Semester-by-Semester Displays 

The requirements for many curricula throughout this section are set forth in semester-by-semester displays. One purpose for these 
displays is to illustrate how certain sequences of courses and prerequisites may be scheduled. Another purpose is to retlect whether 
courses are normally otTered in the Fall or the Spring Semester. Otherwise, the semester-by-semester displays are merely advisory 
and not mandatory. The typical semester schedule shown in the displays may not be the appropriate one for many students. Students 
are required to consult with their faculty advisers prior to registration each semester. Semester-by-semester displays are available 
online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Limited D Grades 

Some colleges and departments have established limitations on the use of D grades in certain courses or categories of courses for 
satisfying graduation requirements. 

Grade Point Average in Major 

Some departments have established graduation requirements of a grade point average of 2.000 on all courses attempted in the major 
at NC State or a "C-" or better in some or all major courses. Such a requirement is in addition to the university grade point average 
requirement of 2.000 for all courses attempted at NC State. Students are encouraged to inquire about specific requirements in majors 
of interest. 

Residence Requirements 

To be eligible for a bachelor's degree, a student must be enrolled in a degree program at NC State, must have completed at least 25 
percent of credit hours required for graduation through courses offered by NC State, and must have earned at least 30 of the last 45 
hours of credit through NC State courses. In no case shall the proportion of credit hours taken at NC State and applied towards a 
bachelor's degree be less than 25 percent. Individual departments and/or colleges may have additional residence requirements. 

Note: The College of Engineering has a policy that transfer students normally must earn at least 48 of their last 60 hours of credit at 
NC State while enrolled as degree candidates. 

Note: The College of Management has a policy that Accounting and Business Management majors normally must earn at least 30 
credit hours while officially enrolled as a degree candidate in either the ACC or BUS curriculum. Students in the Economics majors 
(EC/ECS) must earn at least 1/2 of their required economic credits while enrolled in the EC or ECS curriculum. 

Free Electives 

All schools and colleges are encouraged to include free electives in their curricula to satisfy their educational objectives. Moreover, 
students who would like to take courses beyond those required for their degree are encouraged to do so. 

Classification of Students 

Undergraduate degree students are classified according to the number of completed credit hours. The required number of hours of 
each classification is: 

Classification Semester Hours of Earned Credit 

Freshman (FR) Fewer than 30 

Sophomore (SO) 30 or more, but fewer than 60 

Junior (JR) 60 or more, but fewer than 92 

Senior (SR) 92 or more 

Agricultural Institute students are designated as first (01 ) year if they have earned fewer than 30 semester credits and second (02) 
year if they have earned 30 or more semester credits. 

Unclassified Students (UN) are those working for college credit but not enrolled in a degree-granting program. Admission as an 
unclassified student requires the recommendation of the dean of the school in which the student wishes to enroll. Unclassified 
students must meet the same entrance requirements as regular degree students and must meet the same academic requirements to 
continue. If at a later date, unclassified students wish to change to regular degree status, their credits will be evaluated in terms of the 
requirements of their intended curriculum. 

The Special Student (SP) classification includes Undergraduate Studies (UGS) and Post-Baccalaureate Studies (PBS) students: 

Undergraduate Studies (UGS) students are United States citizens who have not obtained a baccalaureate degree and who take 
courses but who are not currently admitted to a degree program. To be eligible to register as a UGS student, a person should either: 
(a) have acquired a high school diploma or a GED certificate; not have been suspended from any college or university (including NC 
State) within the last three years; and not be a degree candidate at NC State; or (b) be a high school student who has been 
recommended by his/her school and approved by Credit Programs & Summer Sessions to take lower level courses. Visiting Summer 
Sessions students and \ isiting international students do not necessarily have to meet the above criteria. 

34 



North Carolina State University 



Post Baccalaureate Studies (PBS) students are United States citizens who take courses beyond the baccalaureate degree but who are 
not currently admitted to a degree program. This classification is closed to international students with the following exceptions: (a) 
spouses of regularly enrolled NC State degree students; or (b) students enrolled in special programs such as AID or FAO who are 
approved in advance by the International Student Office and the Graduate School. 

All UGS and PBS students must register through Credit Programs & Summer Sessions which is located in the Jane S. McKimmon 
Center for Extension and Continuing Education. Persons found eligible to study as UGS or PBS students are not to assume that they 
have received formal admission to the university as either undergraduate or graduate degree candidates. To become a degree 
candidate, formal application must be made through the Undergraduate Admissions Office or the Graduate School. 

The maximum course load for all UGS and PBS students is two courses plus one physical education course each semester or Summer 
Session. They may enroll in any course offered by the university, provided they have satisfied any required prerequisites and space is 
available. The academic standards applicable to undergraduate degree candidates at the university, including the Continuation of 
Undergraduate Enrollment Policy, apply to UGS and PBS students. 

For the most current information regarding this regulation, please visit the following web site: 
www.ncsu.edu/poIicies/academic_affairs/pols_regs/REG205. 00. 6. php 

Course Load 

The maximum course load for undergraduate degree students is 21 credit hours a semester and two courses plus a physical education 
course in a Summer Session. To carry more than the maximum, students must obtain the approval of their adviser and of their college 
dean. Undergraduate students who propose to register for 19 or more credit hours a semester must obtain approval from their 
academic adviser. First semester freshmen with admissions indices less than 2.000 and continuing students with a grade point average 
less than 2.000 should be advised to carry no more than 1 6 credit hours in a semester. 

For Undergraduate Students (UGS) and Post-Baccalaureate Studies (PBS) students the maximum course load is two courses plus a 
physical education in a regular semester or Summer Session. Exceptions must be approved by Credit Programs & Summer Sessions. 

The minimum course load for full-time undergraduate degree students is 12 credit hours, except in their final semester when a lesser 
number may be taken if that is all the student needs to fiilfill the requirements for a degree. In order to receive financial aid a student 
must meet the minimum course load requirements of the appropriate funding agency. 

The number of hours for which a student is officially enrolled is that number in which the student is enrolled for credit at the end of 
the second week of classes (i.e., the last day to withdraw or drop a course with a refund). 

For the most current information regarding this regulation, please visit the following web site: 
www.ncsu.edu/policies/academic_affairs/pols_regs/REG205. 00. 8. php 

Grading Scale and Grade Points 

Grade Points per Credit Hour 

4.333 
4.000 
3.670 
3.330 
3.000 
2.670 
2.330 
Satisfactory ("Passing" for graduate students) 2.000 

1.670 
1.330 
1.000 
0.670 
0.000 

A grade of a C- satisfies a "grade ofC or better" prerequisite and other "C-Wall" requirement, unless a 
"C Wall " is identified as a C not a C- in a course syllabus. 

For the most current information regarding this regulation, please visit the following web site: 
www.ncsu.edu/policies/academic_affairs/pols_regs/REG205.00.13.php 

35 



Grade 


Definition 


A+ 




A 

A 


Excellent 


A- 

B+ 




B 


Good 


B- 




C 




C 


Satisfactor 


C- 




D+ 




D 


Marginal 


D- 




F 


Failing 



North Carolina State University 



Grade Point Average 

The number of credit hours attempted in a semester of Summer Session (for which grades of A, B, C, D (including plus/minus), or F 
are received) is divided into the total number of grade points earned to arrive at the Grade Point Average (GPA). The Grade Point 
Average will be calculated to three decimal points to a maximum of 4.000. 

For example, if a student takes 16 credit hours, earning an A in two 3-credit courses, a B in one 3-credit course, and a 

B in one 2-credit course, a C in a 3-credit course, and an F in a 2-credit course, the grade point average would be: 

Example GPA Calculation 



6(creditsof A) x 4(grade points per credit hour) =24 

5(creditsofB) x 3(grade points per credit hour) =15 

3(credits of C) x 2(grade points per credit hour) =6 

2(credits of F) x 0(grade points per credit hour) =0 

45 

The total number of grade points earned (45) divided by the number of credit hours attempted (16) equals the grade point average, in 
this case 2.813. 

Grading Guidelines 

All instructors at NC State use the plus/minus grading scale in their courses. 

Students enrolled in each section of a multiple section course in which the material, the sequencing of its treatment, and the 
examination are common to all sections should be graded on the same scale. 

The following grades are not used in the calculation of grade point averages. 

S Satisfactory (Credit-only and certain other courses) 

U Unsatisfactory (Credit-only and certain other courses) 

CR Credit by Examination or Advanced Placement 

IN Incomplete 

LA Temporarily Late 

AU Audit 

NR No Recognition Given for Audit 

W Withdraw or Late Drop 

Description of Letter Grades 

D - Marginal. This grade is used to recognize that a student's performance was marginal but clearly better than that of students who 
receive an F. 

F - Failing. This grade is used to indicate that the student has failed the course. 

S - Satisfactory. This grade is used as a passing grade to be awarded only when the quality of the student's work is judged to be C- or 
higher level. It is used as the passing grade for students who are taking free elective courses under the credit-only option. It may also 
be used for certain courses such as orientation courses, seminars, and research problems, in which regular grades are not appropriate. 

U - Unsatisfactory. This grade is used to indicate that the student is not to receive credit for a credit-only or other course for which 
the passing grade would be S (Satisfactory). 

CR - Credit. This grade is used by the registrar to indicate course credit recei\ed by examination or advanced placement as certified 
by appropriate departments or colleges. This grade shall be awarded only when the ad\anced placement testing indicates that the 
quality of the student's work in the course would have been expected to be of C- or higher le\el. 

IN - Incomplete. This grade is used as a temporary grade. At the discretion of the instructor, students may be given an IN grade for 
work not completed because of a serious interruption in their work not caused by their own negligence. An IN must not be used, 
however, as a substitute for an F when the student's performance in the course is deserving of an F. An IN is only appmpriale when 
the stiidenl 's record in the course is such that the successjul completion oj particular assignments, projects, or tests missed as a result 

36 



North Carolina State University 



of a documented serious event would enable that student to pass the course. Work undertaken to make up the IN grade should be 
limited to the missed work. 

An IN grade must be made up by the end of the next regular semester (not including Summer Sessions) in which the student is 
enrolled, provided that this period is not longer than twelve months from the end of the semester of Summer Session in which the 
work was due. In the event that the instructor or department offering the course is not able to provide a student with the opportunity 
to make up the incomplete work by the end of the next regular semester in which the student is enrolled or within twelve months, 
whichever is shorter, the instructor or department offering the course must notify the Department of Registration and Records of the 
date of the extended deadline for removing the IN grade. 

Any IN grade not removed by the end of the next regular semester in which the student is enrolled or by the end of twelve months, 
whichever is shorter, or by the extended deadline authorized by the instructor or the department offering the course and recorded by 
the Department of Registration and Records will automatically become a Failing (F) grade and will count as a course attempted. 

Students must not register again for courses in which they have IN grades; such registration does not remove IN grades, and the 
completion of the course on the second occasion will automatically result in an F for the incomplete course. 

When a graduating senior received an IN, the following procedures apply: { I ) if the course is needed for graduation, the student will 
not be allowed to graduate until the work has been made up, and (2) if the course is not needed for graduation, the college dean must 
notify, in writing, the Department of Registration and Records either (a) that the course and the IN grade are to be deleted from the 
student's records; or (b) that permission has been given for the IN to remain and that a deadline has been established for the 
completion of the course. In the event that the course is subsequently not completed satisfactorily, the college dean shall notify, in 
writing, the Department of Registration and Records that the course and the IN grade should be deleted from the student's record or 
that the IN should be changed to F. 

LA- Temporarily Late. An emergency symbol to be used only when grades cannot be reported on time by the teaching department 
or the professor. The LA differs from the IN grade in that the student receiving the LA has completed the work of the course 
including the examination. 

The LA should not be used by a teaching department or the instructor unless it is absolutely necessary. When it is used the following 
procedure applies: 

1. Grade Submission must be entered at the regularly scheduled time with the LA clearly indicated; and 

2. A Grade Change Report fomi must be secured from the Department of Registration and Records, completed, and returned at 
the earliest possible time and not later than 15 days after the examination. 

The semester grade reports of those students who receive an LA will not be complete. This situation often causes students to be 
uninfomied as to their academic eligibility and as to the correctness of their schedule for the following semester. 

Audits (Undergraduate) 

AU- Audit. Given in recognition of successfijl completion of a course audit. 

NR- No recognition. Given for unsuccessful completion of a course audit. 

Students wishing to audit a course before or after taking it for credit must have the approval of their adviser and of the department 
offering the course. Auditors are expected to attend class regularly. The degree to which an auditor must participate in class beyond 
regular attendance is optional with the instructor; any such requirements should be clearly explained in writing to the auditor at the 
beginning of the semester. Should the instructor conclude that poor attendance has resulted in an auditor's gaining little from the 
course, the instructor should mark NR (no recognition will be given for an audit) on the final grade report. Students who have take a 
course for audit may, with their adviser's approval enroll in the course for credit during a subsequent semester or Summer Session. 
For tuition cost purposes, audits are treated as fiill credit value. For all other purposes, hours of audit do not count in calculating 
undergraduate course loads. 

Note: Veteran's benefits are governed by Veterans Administration regulation concerning audits. Public Law 94502 (GI. Bill) 
and Public Law 64 (sons and daughters of deceased or disabled veterans) consider only courses being taken for credit when 
determining a student's course load for benefit purposes. For information, contact the Veteran's Affairs Office, 1000 Harris 
Hall, (919)515-3048. 

W- Withdrawal/Late Drop. Used on student's grade reports and transcripts to indicate all courses for which they have received 
official approval to drop or from which they have received official approval to withdraw after the deadlines for dropping. 

Credit by Examination 

Undergraduate students currently registered at NC State (degree, unclassified, or Lifelong Education) may request an examination for 
course credit in a course whether enrolled in that course or not, under the conditions described below. Students must initiate a request 
with their adviser (except when a teaching department awards credit based upon group testing for placement purposes). Should the 
adviser approve, the student must arrange for the examination with the department offering the course. The department may 
administer the examination in any manner pertinent to the materials of the course. Departments are encouraged to offer credit by 

37 



North Carolina State University 



examination in all courses but have the prerogative of excluding certain courses, which are demonstrably unsuited for credit by 
examination. 

The academic standards for credit by examination will be commensurate with the academic standards for the course. If a student's 
performance on the examination is judged to be of "C-" or higher quahty, the department will notify the Department of Registration 
and Records on a Grade Change Report that the student has received Credit by Examination for the course. The Department of 
Registration and Records will enter the appropriate nurnber of credit hours on the student's permanent academic record. Credits 
earned through Credit by Examination are not used in the computation of a student's grade point average. 

The Department of Registration and Records will post course credit by examination to a student's permanent academic record only if 
that student is currently registered at NC State. However, if the course credit by examination would enable a student to complete the 
requirements for a degree, that student would not have to be registered in order to receive the credit. 

If a student fails to achieve "C-" or higher quality work on an attempted credit by examination, no action is required other than the 
department's notifying the student. However, that student is not eligible for another such examination in the same course. 

Once a student has failed a course or has completed credit or audit for more than fifty percent of a course, the student may not attempt 
credit by examination for that course. Under unusual circumstances, exceptions may be made upon the written recommendation of 
the student's adviser and the approval of the department offering the course. A student who receives credit by examination in a course 
in which that student is currently enrolled must officially drop that course no later than mid-semester. 

Credit by Examination Through Independent Studies 

Persons who are not currently enrolled on campus and who have gained through study or experience, knowledge of the content of 
undergraduate credit courses offered through Independent Studies may (with the approval of the Independent Studies staff and the 
academic department offering a course) receive credit for that course by special examination. Students may request approval to 
attempt credit by examination by completing and submitting a form available from Independent Studies, The University of North 
Carolina, Box 1020, The Friday Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-1020, (919)962-1 104. 

Currently enrolled students are not eligible for credit by examination through Independent Studies. These students should go directly 
to the appropriate academic department to request credit by examination under the regular procedures in effect on campus. 

Credit Only Option for Free Elective Courses 

Each undergraduate student has the option to count toward graduation requirements a maximum of 12 semester hours in the category 
of credit-only courses (exclusive of physical education activity courses and other courses authorized to be graded on Satisfactory/ 
Unsatisfactory basis). The student may select as credit-only any course offered by the university except those in Military Science and 
Aerospace Studies. The selected courses must be included under the free elective category of the specific curriculum in which the 
student is enrolled. The student will be responsible for attendance, assignments, and examinations. 

The student's performance in a credit only course will be reported as S (satisfactory grade for credit-only course and given when 
course work is equivalent to C- or better) or U (no credit grade for credit-only course). The grade for a credit only course will have no 
effect on the student's Grade Point Average. The course and its grade will be counted in the cumulative hours attempted. Credit-only 
courses do not count in the calculation of eligibility for the Semester Dean's List, which requires either twelve hours or fifteen hours 
of course work for which grade points are earned. 

Lifelong Education students may take on a credit-only basis any course for which they satisfy prerequisites. Students should be aware 
that many graduate and professional schools evaluate credit-only courses for which "U" grades were awarded as failing grades. 

Transfer Credit 

Transcripts of college course credit for new transfer students and for NC State students who have taken course work at another 
institution are evaluated by the dean of the appropriate school to detennine how the work applies to fulfilling the graduation 
requirements of each student's intended curriculum. Students admitted to an NC State undergraduate degree program who wish to 
take courses at another institution must obtain prior endorsement from their academic department and prior written approval from 
their school dean in order to insure that the transfer credits will apply toward fulfilling specific graduation requirements. Transfer 
credit is not recorded on former students' permanent records until after they have been readmitted and have re-enrolled. 

For the most current information regarding this regulation, please visit the following web site: 
www.ncsu.edu/policies/academic_affairs/enrollment/admissions/REG230. 01. 2. php 

Academic Honors 

High ranking students in their freshman year are eligible for membership in Phi Eta Sigma and Alpha Lambda Delta. Both of these 
national scholastic honoraries require a 3.5 semester grade point average or better during the first semester or a cumulative average of 
3.5 for both semesters during the freshman year. Juniors ranking in the top three percent of their class, seniors ranking in the top six 
percent of their class, and outstanding graduate students are eligible for election to membership in Phi Kappa Phi. the university's 
most prestigious campus-wide scholastic honor society. Outstanding undergraduate and graduate students majoring in the arts and 
sciences are also eligible for election to membership in Phi Beta Kappa. 

38 



North Carolina State University 



For the most current information regarding this regulation, please visit the following web site: 
www.ncsu.edu/policies/academic_affairs/pols_regs/REG205. 00. l.php 

Semester Dean's List. A full-time undergraduate student who earns a semester average of 3 5 or better on 12 to 14 hours of course 
work for which grade points are earned or a semester average of 3.250 or better on 15 or more hours of course work for which grade 
points are earned will be placed on the Dean's List for that semester. Students are not eligible for the Dean's List in any semester in 
which they receive an F or IN grade. When IN grades are resolved, however, students who are otherwise eligible shall be added 
retroactively to the Dean's List for that semester. Dean's List recognition shall be noted on the student's semester grade report and 
permanent academic record. 

Graduation with Honors. Undergraduate degree honor designations are: 

Cum Laude- for GPA 3.25 through 3.499 
Magna Cum Laude- for GPA 3.5 through 3.749 
Summa Cum Laude- for GPA 3.75 and above 

To be eligible for degree honor designations students must have completed at least two semesters and at least 30 credit hours at NC 
State. 

Valedictorian, Salutatorian, and Highest Ranking Scholar in a College. To be eligible for consideration as valedictorian, 
salutatorian, or highest ranking scholar in a college, an undergraduate student must have received at least 100 academic credits at NC 
State (including credit by examination, advanced placement credit, and S/U courses). These 100 credits may include no more than 20 
transfer credits through programs officially sponsored by NC State. Specifically, these programs are Cooperating Raleigh Colleges, 
National Student Exchange, International Student Exchange, NC State sponsored study abroad programs, and the affiliated hospital 
programs in Medical Technology. All students whose accumulated grade point averages, based on all courses attempted at NC State, 
make them eligible for one of these honors, shall be so recognized. That is, in the case of ties, more than one student will receive the 
honor. However in the case of ties for valedictorian, no salutatorian will be recognized. 

Grade Reports 

Grade reports are not mailed at the end of each semester. Grades are posted online within 24 hours after instructors submit them to 
the University Registrar's Office. 

The Department of Registration and Records provides four methods in which students may gain access to term grades: 

TRACS LINK: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records - Requires your Unity ID and password. 
TRACS: (919)515-NCSU (6278) - Requires your student ID number. Please use all 9 digits. 

• Toll Free: 1-877-MY-GRADE (694-7233). Grades are provided toll free and are available telephonically during the exam period 
until approximately two weeks in the next succeeding semester. 

• In Writing: A printed copy of semester grades can be issued only at the written request of the student concerned. The written 
request should be submitted after the first day of classes, but before the last day of classes each semester and should include the 
following information: student's full name, student identification number, PIN, correct correspondence address and signature. 
The request should be mailed to: Department of Registration and Records, Box 7313, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27695- 
7313. 

In Person: Students may come in person to the Department of Registration and Records, 1 000 Harris Hall, and request a printed 
copy of grades for their last enrolled term. The student must show a picture ID to receive grades. Office hours are 8:00am to 
5:00pm, Monday through Friday. 

Transcripts of Academic Records 

Official NC State University transcripts are a complete record of a student's academic work at the university. These transcripts are 
issued on official "SCRIP-SAFE" paper and carry the pre-printed signature of the University Registrar, the date of issue, and the pre- 
printed seal of the university. 

An official transcript is issued only at the written request or authorization of the student concerned. Transcript requests can be made 
in person or in writing either by mail or fax to the Department of Registration and Records, 1000 Harris Hall, Box 7313, NC State 
University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7313; fax: (919)515-2376. TELEPHONE REQUESTS FOR TRANSCRIPTS WILL NOT BE 
HONORED. 

When making a request, the student must include his/her full name (including any names they may have used while at NC State), 
student ID number, date of birth, date of last attendance, and the exact address (including ZIP code) where the transcript is to be sent. 
Requests must include the student's signature. 

CHARGES: Requests must be accompanied by a check, money order, or Visa or MasterCard number and expiration date. 
Transcripts are $5.00 per copy. A charge of $10 per copy is assessed for any transcript that must be faxed. 



39 



North Carolina State University 



Transcript requests will normally be processed at time of request. However, a longer period of time may be required for processing at 
the end of each semester. Official transcripts are not issued for those people who are indebted to the university until such 
indebtedness is paid or satisfactorily adjusted. 

For more information, please contact the Department of Registration and Records, 1000 Harris Hall, (919)515-2575. 

Change of Name, Address, Telephone, or E-mail 

It is the student's responsibility to notify the Department of Registration and Records of any changes in name, address, telephone, or 
e-mail. Failure to do so may prevent prompt delivery of important university correspondence and correct notification of hometown 
newspapers of honors received. International students are required by law to notify the university of any change or correction in name 
or address within 10 days. Updating address changes in TRACS fulfills international students' federal requirements for maintaining 
status in SEVIS. 

Name changes can only be completed in person at Registration and Records, 1000 Harris Hall by providing a picture ID and proof of 
the name change (i.e. driver's license, social security card) 

Changes of address, telephone or e-mail can be completed in one of the following 3 ways: 

TRACS LINK: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records - requires Unity ID and password 

By Phone: (919)515-2576 - Telephone requests will not be accepted during the first week of each semester. Students must provide, 
name, student ID, and PIN in order to change their address over the phone. 

In Writing: The Change of Address form at www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/remote/forms/pdf/addr_change.pdfshouId be completed and 
sent to the Department of Registration and Records, Box 73 13, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 and must include your name, 
student ID number, PIN, new address and signature. 

Double Degrees 

Students who have satisfactorily completed the requirements for more than one bachelor's degree may, upon the recommendation of 
their deans, be awarded two bachelor's degrees at the same or at different commencement exercises. To earn two degrees, students 
register in one school or department and, with the cooperation of the second school or department, work out their program to cover 
the requirements for both. Students must file an approved Curriculum Change Form with Registration and Records, 1000 Harris Hall. 
An Application for Degree Form must be submitted for each degree. 

Intra-Campus Transfers (Curriculum Change) 

Regulation 

1 . A student who has attempted more than twelve credit hours at NC State may transfer to another curriculum provided that the 
student meets the admission requirements of the intended new curriculum (See Appendix W of the Handbook for Advising and 
Teaching). 

2. A student who has attempted twelve or more credit hours at NC State may transfer to another curriculum provided that the 
student is eligible to do so under the intra-campus transfer policy which pertains to the intended curriculum. 

Procedures for Intra-Campus Transfers 

Undergraduate students wishing to change from one curriculum to another must report to the dean's otTice of the college offering the 
curriculum in which entrance is desired and request acceptance into the new college or curriculum. International students must meet 
with an OtTice of International Scholar and Student Services advisor and change their curriculum in SEVIS before submitting the 
Curriculum Change Form to the Department of Registration and Records. 

If acceptance is approved, a Curriculum Change Form (See Appendix W of the Handbook for Advising and Teaching) will be issued, 
bearing the signature of the accepting dean. 

If the former curriculum was in a different college, the Curriculum Change For should be submitted for the signature of the releasing 
dean with the request that all records be transferred to the new college and department. 

From the standpoint of advising, pre-registration, and adding and dropping courses, the student is considered to be in the new 
curriculum as soon as the Curriculum Change Form is completed and filed with the Department of Registration and Records and the 
records of the student have been transferred to the new department. (See also "Readmission of Former and Suspended Degree 
Students" and "University Policies and College/Departmental Policies") 

For the most current information regarding this regulation, please visit the following web site: 
\vww.ncsu.edu/polices/academic_aflfairs/pols_regs/REG205.00.16.php 



40 



North Carolina State University 



Academic Status 



Continuation of Undergraduate Enrollment 

This regulation applies to: a) undergraduate students, including all Lifelong Education students, who enroll in NC State University 
for the first time in the 2004 Fall Semester or thereafter, and b) students admitted to the university in an undergraduate degree seeking 
status in the 2004 Fall Semester or thereafter, regardless of initial university enrollment date. Beginning with the 2006 Fall Semester, 
all undergraduate students, regardless of when they first enrolled in NC State University, will be subject to this regulation. 

Minimum Eligibility Standard 

The minimum eligibility standard for continued enrollment for any undergraduate student is defined as achieving the required 
cumulative grade point average for the total number of credit hours attempted at NC State plus transferred credit hours according to 
the Schedule of Performance Requirements for Continuing Undergraduate Enrollment, referred to hereafter as the Continuation 
Schedule. 

Schedule of Performance Requirements for Continuing Undergraduate Enrollment 

(Effective Fall 2004) 



Credit Hours Attempted 

at NC State Plus 
Credit Hours Transferred 


Minimum Required 
Cumulative Grade Point Average 
on all Courses Taken at NC State 


1-59 


1.8 


60 or more 


2.0 



Undergraduate students who, at the end of any Spring Semester, do not meet the minimum standards shown in the Continuation 
Schedule will not be allowed to continue their enrollment at the university during subsequent Fall and Spring Semesters, with the 
following exceptions: 

no student will be suspended until the end of the student's second regular semester at NC State; 

any student who begins a given semester with a cumulative GPA of 2.00 or better will be eligible to continue in the next regular 

semester in which they seek enrollment regardless of academic performance in that given semester; 

students who are eligible to continue at the end of a Spring Semester will be eligible to continue into the following fall, 

regardless of Summer Session performance; 

students will be eligible to continue their enrollment until they have attempted at least twelve hours at NC State; and, 

suspended students re-admitted on appeal will be eligible to enroll on Academic Probation. 

A student with a cumulative GPA below 2.00 will be in one of three academic statuses: Academic Warning, Academic Suspension, or 
Academic Probation. 

Academic Warning 

Every student who meets the criteria set forth in the above section, but whose cumulative grade point average is less than 2.00, the 
minimum for graduation, will be on Academic Warning Status. The Timely Advising Requirement applies to students on Academic 
Warning Status. 

Academic Suspension 

Academic Suspension Status is assigned at the end of the Spring Semester to students who do not meet the minimum eligibility 
standards and who were enrolled in either the Fall or Spring Semester. Academically suspended students are subject to the provisions 
of the regulation on Readmission of Former and Academically Suspended Undergraduate Degree Students. International students 
who are suspended will have their programs terminated in SEVIS and must immediately meet with an Office of International Scholar 
and Student Services advisor to discuss immigration consequences and limited options for readmission or transfer. 

Academic Probation 

Academically suspended students may appeal to the University Admissions Committee for re-admission on Academic Probation 
Status in order to enroll in a regular semester (fall or spring). Students will not be considered in good academic standing while on 
Academic Probation Status. The Timely Advising Requirement applies to students on Academic Probation Status. The University 
Admissions Committee may prescribe additional requirements as a condition of re-admission. Students who obtain a cumulative GPA 
above the suspension level, after being placed on probation status, will have the probation status discontinued. Students who do not 
obtain a cumulative GPA above the suspension level, by the end of the Spring Semester after being placed on probation, will return to 
Academic Suspension Status. 

Timely Advising Requirement 

All students on Academic Warning Status or Academic Probation Status are required to meet with their academic advisers during the 
first four weeks of classes in regular semesters to review their academic situations and to formulate or review and revise as needed 
their plans of study. Any student in either of these statuses who does not comply with this requirement will not be allowed to register 
and continue enrollment at the university during subsequent Fall and Spring Semesters unless the cumulative GPA of the student is 
2.00 or greater at the end of the semester in which the requirement was not met. 

For the most current information regarding these regulations, please visit the following web site: 
www.ncsu.edu/policies/academic_affairs/academic_progress/REG02. 05. l.php 

41 



North Carolina State University 



Transition of Continuing Students to the Continuation of Undergraduate Enrollment Academic 
Regulation 

Through the end of second Summer Session 2006, students who entered the university as a regular degree seeking student for the first 
time prior to second Summer Session 2004 will continue to be subject to the Schedule of Performance Requirements for Continuing 
Undergraduate Enrollment that became effective Fall 1995, 



Schedule of Performance Requirements for 

Continuing Undergraduate Enrollment 

(Effective, Fall 1995) 



Credit Hours 

Attempted at NC State 

Plus Credit Hours 

Transferred 


Minimum Required 

Cumulative Grade Point 

Average on all Courses Taken 

at NC State 


1-35 


1.5 


36-47 


1.6 


48-59 


1.7 


60-71 


1.8 


72-83 


1.9 


84 or more 


2.0 



Beginning with the Fall Semester 2006, all NC State undergraduate students will be subject to the provisions of the new Continuation 
Schedule (Effective Fall 2004). 

Readmission of Former and Suspended Degree Students 

An undergraduate degree student who fails to enroll or attend at all, during any regular semester, is considered a "former degree 
student", and must re-apply for admission to continue. Readmission applications should be submitted as soon as possible but no later 
than 30 days prior to the date of desired enrollment. Former students returning should be aware that enrollment restrictions may be 
imposed at any time, which may affect their readmission. 

A non-refundable charge must accompany all applications. 

Readmission for Students Eligible to Continue 

Students who were eligible to continue at NC State at the time of leaving and who have a grade point average of at least 2.0 on all 
courses taken at NC State are eligible to be readmitted to their former program, provided the program has the capacity to accept 
additional students. 

A student who was eligible to continue at the time of leaving who has subsequently completed academic work at another institution 
and earned less than a C- average on such work must complete a readmission form and write a letter of petition to the Undergraduate 
Admissions Committee. 

A student who was eligible to continue at the time of leaving and whose grade point average is less than 2.0 on all courses taken at 
NC State will be: 

• Considered for readmission on Academic Warning status if the student's GPA is not lower than the level required to be eligible to 
continue under the current regulation; or 

Considered for readmission on Academic Probation Status for one semester if the student's GPA is below the level required to be 
eligible to continue under the current policy. 

• Former students returning who desire a change of curriculum must be accepted into the desired major based upon current 
matriculation requirements and submit a properly validated Curriculum Change Form (See Appendix W in the Handbook for 
Advising and Teaching) to the Department of Registration and Records before readmission can be processed. (See Intra-Campus 
Transfers) 

Readmission for Suspended Students 

A student whose grade point average on all courses taken at NC State is such that the student has been suspended may seek 
readmission under the rules in Sections 4 through 6 below. 



42 



North Carolina State University 



Readmitted academically suspended students will be on Academic Probation Status and will not be considered in good academic 
standing until such time as they meet the appropriate minimum cumulative GPA requirement based upon the university's 
Continuation of Undergraduate Enrollment regulation. 

Any academically suspended student needing 14 or fewer credit hours for graduation and having a GP (Grade Point) deficit of 10 or 
less will be automatically readmitted to the university on Academic Probation Status for one semester without petitioning for 
readmission. 

Such students will be permitted to register for successive academic semesters provided that, following readmission, each 
semester GPA is at least 2.500 until such time as the cumulative GPA is 2.000 or greater (at which time the Academic Probation 
Status will be removed). 

Failure to achieve the required 2.500 semester GPA or the minimum overall GPA required by the Continuation of Undergraduate 
Enrollment regulation will result in an additional notice of academic suspension from the university at the end of either the Fall 
or Spring Semester. 

• So long as the student is on Probation Status, s/he will be limited to a maximum of 14 hours registration each semester (any 
exception must be approved by the adviser and Academic Dean of the college in which the student is enrolled). 

Automatic Readmission Based on Academic Performance 

A student who is academically suspended may enroll in NC State University Summer Session courses and NC State University 
Independent Studies courses in order to attempt to improve their overall academic performance. 

With consent of the academic department in which the student was formally enrolled, a suspended student may enroll in NC State 
University Distance Education courses. 

Courses taken through this avenue must be consistent with the student's program of study. 

To facilitate taking distance education courses, a student must contact his/her academic adviser or the coordinator of advising in 

the student's major department to request departmental consent. 

Enrollment in NC State University Summer Session, Independent Study, and/or Distance Education courses will be limited to a total 
of two courses (plus applicable labs) at any given time. An additional one credit hour Physical Education course can be added for 
students attending on campus Summer Sessions. 

If grades earned through NC State Summer Session courses. Independent Study courses, or NC State Distance Education courses are 
sufficient to remove the suspension, the student may be automatically readmitted in the subsequent semester without admission 
committee review. 

Readmission Based on Appeals to the University Admissions Committee 

If the student chooses not to pursue any of the above course options or fails to earn grades sufficient to meet the minimum cumulative 
GPA requirement (based on the university's Continuation of Undergraduate Enrollment regulation), the following rules for appeals to 
the Undergraduate Admissions Committee will apply: 

First Notice of Academic Suspension. Upon receiving the first notice of academic suspension from the university, a mandatory one 
regular semester break in enrollment will be imposed for the semester following receipt of the notice (i.e., the Fall or Spring 
Semester). 

During the one-semester break in enrollment, a suspended student may take advantage of an alternative readmission program. This 
requires a Psychoeducational Assessment offered by the University Counseling Center. The goal of this assessment is to help 
suspended students identify any underlying educational, behavioral, psychological, or medically related cause(s) of the previously 
poor educational performance and to make recommendations for adjustments. Students are strongly encouraged to participate in this 
intervention program. 

Upon verification by the Counseling Center of completion of the Psychoeducational Assessment the student will be eligible for 
readmission at the beginning of the next semester without admission committee review. 

For readmission in the Spring Semester, evaluations done at the NC State Counseling Center must be scheduled prior to August 
15 and be completed by October 20. Note: Students would not be enrolled during the Fall Semester. 

• For readmission in the Fall Semester, Evaluations done at the NC State Counseling Center must be scheduled prior to May 1 and 
be completed by July 15. Note: Students would not be enrolled during the Spring Semester. 

Off-campus, licensed mental health service providers under the guidelines provided by the NC State Counseling Center may also 
conduct evaluations. Acceptable reports, however, must be filed and discussed by the student with a counselor at the Counseling 
Center by the October 20 and July 1 5 dates. 

After an absence of at least one regular semester following the first notice of academic suspension, students choosing not to take 
advantage of the alternative readmission process may petition for readmission through the Admission Committee. The petition 
should provide evidence of motivation and/or achievement based on any academic work or systematic review of previous 
perfomiance completed during the suspension period. 

43 



North Carolina State University 



Upon readmission the student must meet with their academic advisor to update their plan of study and review their strategies for 
academic success. Failure to meet with the adviser and to update their plan of study may resuh in the cancellation of the student's 
enrollment. 

Second Notice of Academic Suspension. Upon receiving the second notice of academic suspension from the university, a 
mandatory two regular semester break in enrollment will be imposed. At the end of the mandatory period, the student may petition 
the Undergraduate Admissions Committee for readmission. 

Petitions for readmission must be accompanied by: 

transcript of any courses (including grades) taken during the suspension, and 

a detailed plan of study, developed with the assistance and approval of the adviser, or department designee, outlining courses to 

be taken in each subsequent semester and the level of perfomiance (GPA and number of hours each semester) necessary to 

complete the degree requirements, and 

a written evaluation by the advi,ser candidly discussing the probability the student will be able to meet the performance 

expectations, and 

evidence that the student participated in the specified intervention program following the automatic reinstatement after the first 

academic suspension. 

If the Admissions Committee decides to readmit the student: 

The student as a mandatory condition of continued enrollment must follow the negotiated plan of study. The plan of study shall 
specify the GPA to be maintained and the number of hours to be carried by the student each semester until graduation. 

• This plan of study cannot replace or supersede university graduation requirements, such as the 2.000 overall GPA required for 
graduation, or any other requirements as may be specified in the student's curriculum regarding grade points, hours of D, etc., for 
graduation. 

• As long as the student's cumulative GPA is less than the minimum required, this plan of study, when accepted by the university, 
will supersede the graduated Schedule of Performance Requirements for Continuing Undergraduate Enrollment ("continuation 
schedule") used to determine suspension. 

• Failure to follow the plan of study will result in the cancellation of the student's enrollment and a third notice of suspension from 
the university. 

If the student performs at a level to earn a cumulative GPA that exceeds 2.000, strict adherence to the plan of study may no longer be 
required. However, a student whose performance drops in subsequent semesters, will then be subject, to a third suspension for poor 
academic performance. 

Third Notice of Academic Suspension. Upon the third notice of academic suspension, the student will be permanently suspended 
from the university, except as provided for under the Contractual Readmission Policy. 

Contractual Readmission. (An appeal to Undergraduate Admissions Committee by students who have not been enrolled at NC 
State for three or more years) After not being enrolled at NC State (excluding Summer Sessions, Independent Studies, and NC State 
Distance Education courses) for a continuous three-year period or longer, a student whose former academic record at NC State was 
such that the student was suspended or would have been suspended under current policies, may petition the Undergraduate 
Admissions Committee for contractual readmission. 

The Committee will decide each case on its individual merits with special regard to the student's written appeal, the productive use of 
the three or more intervening years, evidence of motivation and achievement based on any academic work done during those three or 
more years, and a supporting letter from the department offering the curriculum into which the student requests admission. This letter 
must contain a proposed plan of study agreed to and signed by the student, the department head, and the dean. If the curriculum into 
which the student requests admission is different from that in which the student was last enrolled, the petition to the Admissions 
Committee must also be accompanied by a Curriculum Change Form (See Appendix W in the Handbook for Advising and Teaching) 
approved by the accepting dean. 

If a contractual readmission is approved, the following conditions will apply: 

The student's entire academic record at NC State will be recorded on any subsequent transcript, including a grade point average 
on all work attempted at NC State. 

• For courses attempted prior to readmission, only work of C- or better will count toward fulfilling graduation requirements, 
providing that such courses meet current curriculum requirements. 

• For purposes of suspension and eligibility for graduation, a second grade point average will be calculated based only on courses 
that are attempted after readmission. Total hours for graduation and suspension will be based on all work at NC State after 
readmission plus former work of C- or better that is acceptable to the department plus hours transferred from other institutions. 

• The student must maintain an overall grade point average of 2.0 or better on all courses attempted after readmission. 



44 



North Carolina State University 



• Students who fail to achieve an overall grade point average of 2.0 will lose their contractual readmission status. Their status for 
subsequent work as a degree student at NC State shall be detennined on the basis of total hours attempted at NC State plus 
transferred hours and their grade point average calculated using all courses attempted at NC State. 

• A student may be readmitted under this option only once. 

Notice of Readmission 

Once a student has received notice of readmission, the student should pay the semester's tuition at the University Cashier's Office 
(1101 Pullen Hall) and register for the schedule of courses agreed upon in consultation with her/his adviser. The student's personal ID 
number will be included in the notice of readmission. 

Withdrawal from the University 

Students who wish to drop all the courses for which they are registered must withdraw from the university for the remainder of the 
semester or Summer Session in which they are enrolled. Students who have registered and prepaid are considered to be registered and 
must be officially withdrawn, unless they have notified the university prior to the beginning of the first day of classes that they wish 
to have their registration cancelled. (See Registration Cancellation and Refund of Tuition and Fees in the Handbook for Advising and 
Teaching) 

The procedure for withdrawing is different in several ways from the procedure for dropping one or some courses but not all. First, the 
procedure is not initiated in the academic department or college. Second, a Schedule Revision Form is not used. Third, it is highly 
recommended, but not required, that students considering withdrawal consult their faculty adviser or department coordinator of 
advising. The withdrawal process is as follows. 

Degree candidates and Unclassified students initiate the official withdrawal process with the Counseling Center, Student Health 
Center, 515-2423. Parental approval to withdraw may be required for single students who are under eighteen. 

Lifelong Education students contact Credit Programs & Summer Sessions, McKimmon Center, 515-2265. 

International students who wish to withdraw from the university must meet with an Office of International Scholar and Student 
Services advisor to effect a withdrawal in SEVIS before withdrawing from the university in order to protect their immigration status. 
International students who are contemplating a withdrawal must call OISSS, 515-2961 for an appointment. 

NC State students carrying course work at another campus under the interinstitutional arrangement must contact the Department of 
Registration and Records, 1000 Harris Hall, 515-3048, to initiate the paperwork necessary for removal from the class roll at the other 
institution. 

Students visiting from other institutions who are registered for NC State course work under the Interinstitutional arrangement must 
initiate withdrawal on their home campus. 

Financial Aid recipients who withdraw during the semester or Summer Sessions may be required to repay all or a portion of the aid 
received, depending on the date upon which the withdrawal is effective. All students are required to get clearance through the Office 
of Scholarships and Financial Aid during the withdrawal process to determine their individual repayment obligations. 

Withdrawal After the Last Day of the Official Drop Period 

It is considered that after the last day of the official drop period a student has become a partner in an implied contract with the 
university to continue until the end of the semester. Therefore, withdrawals without academic penalty are granted by the university 
only when exception circumstances exist. 

Undergraduate and graduate degree students may receive late withdrawals through the Counseling Center under three conditions: 

1. Certification by an appropriate medical professional of serious disruption in academic fianctioning for medical reasons. Such 
medical petitions are subject to review by a university physician and by the Counseling Center. 

2. Certification by the Counseling Center of serious disruption in academic fianctioning because of an emotional problem or 
crisis. It is important to verify that (a) there has been a significant decrease in the student's usual level of psychological 
fianctioning and (b) that regaining that previous level of fianctioning will involve a process of sufficient academic disruption 
to make continuing as a student unreasonable. In this case a "hold" may often be placed on the student's readmission 
pending certification by the Counseling Center and/or independent psychologist/psychiatrist that the student has regained 
and can be expected to maintain that usual level of psychological competence. 

3. Verification by the office of the student's college dean that a decision has been reached in accordance with that college's 
policies and procedures that a documented hardship of any kind which, responsibly handled, resulted in it being 
unreasonable to insist that the student continue. The hardship should normally have been reasonably unforeseeable. 

Courses for which students are officially enrolled are recorded on the transcript without grades or grade points but with a notation of 
"W" to indicated approval to withdraw after the withdrawal deadline. 



45 



North Carolina State University 



Repeating Courses 

Course Repeat Policy 

Students who repeat a course, regardless of the grade previously made, will have both grades counted in their cumulative grade point 
average. 

• Undergraduate students may be allowed as many semester hours as are appropriate in the departmental curriculum for courses 
that are titled seminar, special topics, independent study or research (usually numbered 490-499 or 590-599) and cover topics 
different from those studied when the courses were taken previously. Unless a course satisfies one or the other of the above 
conditions, the semester hours will be counted only once toward the number of hours required for graduation even though 
students repeat and pass the course both times. 

The adviser's approval is required for students to repeat any course previously passed with a C- or better; no approval can be 
given for a grade of A or B. Nor will it be given when: students wish to repeat a lower division course that they have passed with 
a grade of C- or better after having successfully completed; students wish to take an introductory course after they have 
successfully completed an advanced course dealing with similar material. 

Students must not register again for any courses in which they have IN grades; such registration does not remove IN grades; and 
the completion of the course on the second occasion will automatically result in an F for the uncompleted course. 

For the most current information regarding this regulation, please visit the following web site: 
www.ncsu.edu/policies/academic_affairs/pols_regs/REG205.00.23.php 

First Year Course Repeat Policy 

For courses first attempted in Fall 1995 and afterwards. 

The first year course repeat policy is one of forgiveness that helps new NC State undergraduate students maintain good academic 
standing. The policy is necessary because new students lack familiarity with the university, and as a result, are more likely to make 
errors in their choice of courses and total course load. 



Effects 



The eligible student who repeats a course while electing that the first year course repeat policy apply, will have the grade points 
and the credit hours attempted and earned on the first completion of the course removed from the calculation of the cumulative 
grade point average which will result ft-om the removal of the grade points and credit hours attempted and earned on the first 
completion of the course will be calculated and recorded on the student's record after the second completion of the course. 
The course title and grade for the first completion will be shown on the official record with a code (R) to indicate that it was 
repeated and that the first grade was removed from the computation of the cumulative grade point average. 
The recorded grade point average of the student for the semester in which the course was originally taken will not be changed. 
Repeating a course and exercising the first year course repeat policy does not retroactively change the status of the student as to 
semester academic hours, academic warning, probation, or suspension in prior semesters. 

Many graduate and professional schools recompute grade point averages in the process of considering an application for 
admission to such programs. This recomputation of grade point averages may include restoring the cumulative grade point 
average effects of initial attempts at courses repeated under this policy. 



Eligibility 



1 . the initial attempt and the repeat under this policy must be an NC State course; 

2. the course being repeated was completed for the first time after the Summer Session II 1995; 

3. the course being repeated must be at the 100- or 200- level; 

4. the student received a grade below C- in the course that is to be repeated; 

5. both attempts of the course were for letter grades; no unsuccessful audits or credit-only attempts may be repeated nor may 
repeats under the policy be made for audit or credit-only; 

6. the student has received credit for an advanced course dealing with the same subject matter as the course being repeated; 

7. the first attempt of the course must have occurred within 12 months of the student's initial enrollment in any classification at 
NC State; this period is not lengthened by voluntary or involuntary failure to enroll in subsequent semesters or Summer 
Session, nor by enrolling at less than a minimum full-time load following the initial date of enrollment; 

8. the second attempt is for the same course or for an approved substitute course; 

9. the second attempt occurs in a regular semester or Summer Session which ends within 12 months of the completion of the 
first attempt of the course; if the course is not available during that period or if the student is not enrolled when it is 
available, then the second attempt must occur in the next regular semester during which the student is enrolled at NC State 
and the course is available; 

10. the notice of Exercise of First Year Course Repeat Policy is filed by the student with the Department of Registration and 
Records on or before the "last day to drop a course without a grade for courses at the 400 level and below" of the semester 
or Summer Session in which the course is repeated. 

46 



North Carolina State University 



Procedures 

1 . students are advised to consult with their advisers in making the decision to elect a course repeat under this policy. 

2. the student must submit a Notice of Exercise of First Year Course Repeat to the Department Registration and Records on or 
before the last day to drop a course without a grade at the 400 level or below of the semester or Summer Session in which 
the course is repeated. Forms may be obtained from advisers, departmental coordinators of advising, associate deans for 
academic programs, or the Department of Registration and Records. 

Code of Student Conduct 

All smdents who enroll at NC State are required to adhere to the Code of Student Conduct. This code "sets our the kind of behavior 
that disrupts and inhibits the nomial functioning of the university, and what action it will take to protect the community from such 
disruption." Academic and Non- Academic Misconduct, both on and off campus are addressed in the Code. Students will receive 
sanctions that may range from a warning to expulsion from the university. For more infonnation contact the Office of Student 
Conduct at (919)515-2963 or access the code through the following web site: www.ncsu.edu/student_conduct. 



NC STATE STUDENT SERVICES 



Accident and Health Insurance 

The university offers students a medical insurance program to purchase. The insurance covers the surgical, accident, and hospital 
needs of participating students as a supplement to Student Health Services. Each year complete information is available to students at 
the start of the Fall and Spring Semesters. Students are strongly encouraged to have medical insurance protection of some type. 
Continuous enrollment in the university's student accident and health insurance program is required of all international students on a 
student visa (F-1 or J-1 ). All other students are strongly encouraged to have medical insurance protection of some type. 

Bookstores 

The otTicial campus source for all course books is the NC State Bookstore, 
consisting of the main store, located on East Dunn Avenue, the North 
Campus Shop, located in the lower level of Erdahl Cloyd Annex of the 
D. H. Hill Library, and the Century Shop located in Research III, 
Centennial Campus. At the main store, the book division provides 
textbooks, fiction, nonfiction, technical and reference titles, publishers' 
overstock and remainders, college outlines, paperbacks, book reviews, 
periodicals, and calendars. The merchandise division carries school 
supplies, personal computers with accessories and supplies, art and 
engineering supplies, greeting cards, health and beauty aids, imprinted 
sportswear, souvenirs, and convenience items. Special orders are accepted 
for books and merchandise. Purchases may be charged by VISA, 
MasterCard, Discover, American Express, or AllCampus Money Card. 

During the opening of Fall and Spring Semesters, the main store is open specified evenings, in addition to each Tuesday evening and 
Saturday when classes are in session. North Campus Shop specializes in computer supplies, sale books, magazines, souvenirs, gifts, 
and convenience items. The entire operation of the Bookstore is completely self-supporting, with its annual surplus transferred to the 
NC State Scholarship Fund. 




Campus Recreation 

The mission of the Department of Campus Recreation is to provide diverse opportunities for the campus community of NC State 
University and expand the knowledge of and participation in recreational activities, which foster healthy lifestyles, sportsmanship, 
teamwork, and leadership. The Department is composed of the following activity programs: Club Sports, Fitness/Wellness, 
Intramural Sports and Outdoor Adventures. 

Club Sports 

A sport club is a registered student organization formed by individuals with a common interest in a sport or activity that exists to 
promote and develop interest in that particular activity. Clubs may be instructional, recreational, competitive, or some combination 
thereof Characterized by being student-initiated and student-managed, the basic structure of sport clubs allows members numerous 
opportunities for leadership. There are currently 46 affiliated sport clubs: Aikido, All-Girl Cheerleading, Australian Rules Football, 
Badminton, Baseball, Basketball (W), Bowling, Cricket, Cross Country/Track, Cycling/Mountain Biking, Dance Team, Disc Golf, 
Equestrian, Fencing, Field Hockey, Gymnastics, Ice Hockey, Lacrosse (M&W), Martial arts. Outing, Racquetball, Rodeo, Roller 
Hockey, Rowing, Rugby (M&W), Sailing, Shaolin Kung Fu, Ski & Snowboard, Soccer (M&W), Social Ballroom Dance, Softball, 
Squash, Swimming, Table Tennis, Tae Kwon Do, Tennis, Triathlon, Ultimate (M&W), Volleyball (M&W), Water Polo, Water Ski/ 
Wakeboard. 



47 



North Carolina State University 



Fitness/Wellness 

There are approximately 38 hours ofGroup Fitness classes each week during the academic year and approximately 15 hours in the 
summer. Classes such as step and hi/lo aerobics, cardio-boxing, hip hop, total body conditioning, pilates, mind-body-balance, core 
resistance training, jump rope, slide, water fitness, and yogalates classes allow diverse and energetic opportunities to help participants 
meet their fitness goals. In addition, Fitness/Wellness Educational Workshops are offered that provide knowledge about topics like: 
injury prevention, time and stress management, relaxation and massage, nutrition, eating disorders, yoga, Latin dance, self-defense, 
weight training, body composition assessment, and goal setting. 

Intramural Sports 

Eighteen team and individual special events and co-recreational activities are 
otfered through the intramural sports program. Activities include basketball, flag 
football, soccer, softball, volleyball, badminton, bowling, cross country, golf 
tennis, kickball, racquetball, squash, quickball, swimming, table tennis, and track & 
field. 

Outdoor Adventures 

Outdoor Adv entures offers adventure-based trips, educational workshops, and 

outdoor rental equipment. Adventure trips are offered by skilled and qualified 

guides to some of the most pristine areas of this country. Trips such as sea 

kayaking, white w ater rafting, caving, hang gliding, backpacking, and canoeing are 

offered. Educational Workshops include topics such as w ildemess survival, back 

country cooking, rock climbing, and map & compass skills. Equipment check out 

offers a variety of outdoor equipment. Available equipment includes: tents, backpacks, sleeping bags, lanterns, stoves and canoes. In 

addition, there are hours designated for recreational rock climbing on the indoor rock-climbing wall located in Carmichael 

Gymnasium. 

The Department of Campus Recreation is located in room 1000 Carmichael Gym. For more information, please see the following 
web site: www.ncsu.edu/campusrec. 




The University Career Center 

The University Career Center's goal is two-fold: to assist students in developing their career objectives and to provide resources for 
students to link to the employment world. The University Career Center offers assistance to all students at the university on a year- 
round basis. 

Services provided by the Career Center are designed to meet the needs of all students, from freshmen to graduate students, in their 
various stages of career development. Career counselors provide individual counseling as well as campus wide, career-planning 
workshops that cover topics such as resume development and interview strategies. In addition, the center helps students find 
internships, summer, part-time, and full-time jobs related to their career objectives. Center statT members promote, arrange, and 
coordinate job interviews between students and employer representatives, schedule visits of recruiters to campus, refer employers to 
view students' on-line resumes, and maintain job vacancy announcements. The center maintains career and job information on-line 
and through its library. 

The Career Center is located in 2100 Pullen Hall and at www.ncsu.edu/career. 




48 



North Carolina State University 



Chaplains' Cooperative Ministry 

Ann Pearce, Director 

3 106 Talley Student Center 

Box 7306, NC State 27695 



phone: (919)515-2414 

e-mail: acpearce@unity.ncsu.edu 

www.ncsu.edu/student_affairs/chaplains/index. html 



The Chaplains' Cooperative Ministry at NC State is an interfaith organization which both supports individual campus ministries and 
plans jointly sponsored interfaith programs for students, faculty, and staff. Its members, both ordained and non-ordained, strive to be 
leaders within the university as inquiry, dialogue, and development are engaged with trust at all levels. 

The office has a prominent location on the third floor of the Talley Student Center. Ministries within member groups support the 
spiritual and emotional growth of students through scriptural studies, worship, meals, socials, various outings, retreats, mission trips, 
counseling, service projects, and opportunities for leadership. Following is a list of current phone numbers and addresses: 



University Liaison 

Michael Giancola 

3115 Talley, Box 7306, Raleigh, NC 27695 

515-9248; e-mail: mike_giancola@,ncsu.edu 



Baptist Student Union 

Charity Roberson 

2702 Hillsborough Street, Raleigh, NC 27607 

834-1875; e-mail: bsu4raleigharea@yahoo.com 



Campus Cliristian Fellowship 

Neal AUigood 

PO Box 5182, Raleigh, NC 27650 

602-4244; e-mail: noalligo@unity.ncsu.edu 



Campus Crusade for Christ 

Mike Mehaffie' 

1912 Myron Drive, Raleigh, NC 27607 

782-3393; e-mail: michael.mehaflfie@uscm.org 



Catholic Campus Ministry 

(Doggett Center for Campus Ministry) 

Rev. Bill Long 

600 Bilyeu Street, Raleigh, NC 27606 

833-9668; e-mail: blong@unity.ncsu.edu 



Chi Alpha Christian Fellowship 
(Assemblies of God) 

Brian Hargett 

5204 Passenger Place, Raleigh, NC 27603 

661-9005; e-mail: ncsuxa@aol.com 



Disciples Student Fellowship 

Rob Morris 

718 Hillsborough Street, Raleigh, NC 27603 

832-3953; e-mail: rob@hillyerchurch.org 



Episcopal Campus Ministry 

Rev. Deborah Fox 

2208 Hope Street, Raleigh, NC 27607 

834-2428; e-mail: episcost@bellsouth.net 



Grace Community Church 

Rev. Berk Wilson 

201 Coorsdale Drive, Cary, NC 27511 

447-7670; e-mail: graceforyou@juno.com 



InterVarsity Christian Fellowship 

Amy Phillips 

6201 Tributary Drive, Raleigh, NC 27609 

754-8513; e-mail: amy_phillips@msn.com 



Lutheran Campus Ministry 

Rev. Beverly Alexander 

2723 Clark Avenue, Raleigh, NC 27607 

828-1433; e-mail: LCM-Raleigh@att.com 



Navigators 

Todd Harrison 

2017 Betry Place, Raleigh, NC 27603 

274-5532; e-mail: tkh429@aol.com 



Presbyterian Campus Ministry (USA) 
Rev. Allen Proctor 

27 Home Street, Box 5635, Raleigh, NC 27650 
834-5184; e-mail: allen@wrpc.org 



Reformed University Fellowship (PCA) 

Rev. Ben Inman 

209 Oberlin Road, Raleigh, NC 27605 

546-0515; e-mail: hermsol@juno.com 



Wesley Foundation (United Methodist) 

Rev. Kirk Oldham 

2503 Clark Avenue, Raleigh, NC 27607 

833-1861; e-mail: raleigh-wesley@nccumc.org 



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North Carolina State University 



Interfaith Council 

The Interfaith Council is sponsored by the Chaplains" Cooperative Ministry as an organization of leaders who represent registered 
religious groups at NC State. All members are proponents of inquiry, dialogue, and truth, and while not denying the truths of their 
own traditions, willingly cooperate with and support the other members in the development of their communities. 



BahaM Club 

Omead Ahdieh 

Box 71 1 1, NC State Campus, Raleigh, NC 27695 

513-3257; e-mail: bahais_ncsu@hotmail.com 

www.ncsu.edu/studorgs/bahai 



Hillel - Jewish Student Life 

Debbie La,\er 

8210 Creedmoor Road, #104; Raleigh, NC 27613 

844-4613; e-mail: debbie@nchillel.org 

www.ncsu.edu/stud_orgs/hillel 



Latter-day Saints Institute of Religion 

Erik Marlowe 

6 Enterprise Street, Raleigh. NC 27607 

833-3484; e-mail: marloweek@ldschurch.org 

www.ldsces.org/institutes 



Muslim Student Association 

Omar Askar 

RO. Box 5564, Raleigh, NC 27605 

389-6619; e-mail: esali@unity.ncsu.edu 

www.ncsu.edu/stud_orgs/msa 



Self Knowledge Symposium 

Ed Cheely 

402 East Hargett Street, Raleigh. NC 27601 

832-7436: e-mail: ed@selfknowledge.org 

www.selfknowledge.org 



SGI - USA (Buddhist) 

Padmini S. Hands 

6307 Chapel Hill Road, Raleigh. NC 27610 

832-5083; e-mail: padmini@ncsu.edu 

www.sgi-usa.org 



Counseling 

The Counseling Center assists individuals in gaining a better understanding of themselves. Psychologists, professional counselors, 
and psychiatrists are available to work with students who desire assistance with concerns such as choosing a career, academic 
planning, identifying and overcoming educational difficulties, developing greater self-understanding, developing greater self- 
understanding, developing more satisfying personal relations, and coping with stress or emotional crisis. All counseling is strictly 
confidential. 

In addition to individual counseling, workshops, and support groups are offered throughout the year in a variety of areas, including 
vocational exploration and stress reduction. 

The Counseling Center is located in the Student Health Center, 2815 Cates Avenue, 2nd Floor. Appointments may be scheduled by 
calling (919)515-2423 or by stopping by the office. 

Disability' Services 

Disability Services for Students (DSS) facilitates accommodations and services for currently enrolled students with documented 
disabilities and health concerns. Accommodations and services are rendered based on the individual student's documented needs and 
are determined in consultation with the student and his/her DSS service provider. DSS will maintain appropriate confidentiality of 
records and communication regarding disability. To receive accommodations and services, please apply with the DSS office as far in 
advance as possible. The DSS office is located in the Student Health Center, 2815 Cates Avenue, Suite 1900. Phone: voice - 
(919)515-7653, TTY - (919)515-8830, fax: (919)513-2840, web site: wvvw.ncsu.edu/dss 

Food Service 

University Dining, the university's food service department, has 18 campus locations to serve students, 
faculty, and staff. Awarded the Ivy Award by Restaurant & Institutions magazine in 1988, University 
Dining is recognized nationally for exciting and innovative concepts in campus dining. 

Fountain Dining Hall, located on West Campus and East Campus Dining Hall, located on East Campus 
serve as the main hubs for the meal-plan program. Both Dining Halls ofTer patrons an all-you-can-eat 
menu in a modern, comfortable atmosphere that breaks from the traditional cafeteria-style ser\ ice. The 
Dining Halls are open seven days a week, with brunch and dinner ser\ cd on weekends. A registered 
dietician is on staff to assist with dietary restrictions and to provide nutritional or diet counseling. 

Meal Plans 

Freshmen who live in the residence halls are required to participate in one of many University Dining meal plans, each tailored to 
meet different needs. All six meal plans are designed with both stmcture and flexibility. The structured element of the program is a 
set number of meals served in an all-you-can-eat fashion in the Dining Halls. The flexible element is a Board Bucks system. Part of 
the meal plan purchase price is directly converted to a non-refundable Board Bucks account that can be used only at University 




50 



North Carolina State University 



Dining locations on campus. Board Bucks are a dollar- for-dollar equivalence built into each meal plan to allow students the 
flexibility of eating meals away from the Dining Halls. The meal program is designed to allow students to choose the number of 
structured meals and the amount of flexible Board Bucks. 

University Dining takes pride in offering quality food and services designed specifically to meet the wants and needs of students. 
These six meal plans provide students with varied menu choices and the utmost in convenience. For more information on meal plans 
contact the AllCampus Office, West Dunn Building, (919)515-3090 or visit our web site at www.ncsu.edu/dining. 

Health 

The university seeks to safeguard the health of the students in every way possible. Student Health Services, located in the Student 
Health Center, offers medical care to students on an outpatient basis. The facility is staffed by full time physicians, physician 
extenders, registered nurses, and other medical support personnel. 

Health Services is open for outpatient medical care from Sam to 9pm, Monday through Friday, and 8:30am to 1 1 :30am on Saturdays 
during Fall and Spring Semesters (excluding breaks). Physicians maintain regular office hours Monday through Friday and are on 
call at other times. A nurse staffed clinic is operated during evenings and Saturdays. Patients are seen by appointment 
(515-7107); Gynecology (515-7762). Summer Session hours are Monday through Friday, Sam to 5pm with no after hours services. 

All registered students pay a health fee which covers outpatient professional services; i.e. visits to a nurse or physician, some 
laboratory procedures, some medications available in the student pharmacy, visits to the Counseling Center and to Health Promotion. 
There is a nominal charge for x-rays, most lab tests, allergy injections, prescription medications and special clinics. Students are 
responsible for the cost of laboratory tests and x-rays which must be performed by an off-campus agency, medications not available 
in the student pharmacy, and expenses incurred when referred to an off-campus physician or hospital. 

All health and medical information is confidential and is not divulged to anyone without the written consent of the patient. 

Health Educators offer a variety of information, programs, and services to students. Health topics include weight control, alcohol and 
drug education, stress management, sexually transmitted diseases, women's issues, and more. Call 515-WELL (9355) for 
information. 



Transportation 

Transportation is responsible for administering parking services, campus transit services, 
transportation alternatives and the maintenance of transportation facilities on campus. All 
vehicles parking on campus must display an appropriate NC State permit. Hours of 
enforcement are 7am - 5pm, Monday through Friday, in most areas. Residential areas (zones 
DW and DE) are enforced until midnight. 

All students living on campus or further than a mile from campus are eligible to apply for a 
parking permit online during TRACS registration. When TRACS closes. Transportation 
opens a permit application on our secure web site - www.ncsu.edu/transportation. 
Instructions on the homepage will guide you through the application and permit process. 
Online payment is also offered. Permits do not rollover; you must apply each year to be 
eligible for pemiit assignment. Available permits are assigned based on class seniority and 
date and time of registration. Permit assignment notifications are sent via e-mail in mid to 
late summer to the e-mail address on file with Registration and Records. It's important to 
keep this address updated in order to receive notification. Students are strongly encouraged to 
join the Packparking listserv to keep current on transportation news and events. 

Transportation options include the university's Wolfiine bus service, public transit, 
motorcycles, mopeds, bicycles, carpools, vanpools, and walking. 

NC State Wolfiine buses run every day classes are in session and during exams. Service frequency varies, but generally daytime 
service is available every 15 minutes. Wolfiine provides intra-campus service, and service to McKimmon Center. Official University 
Housing and park and ride lots. Visit the Wolfiine web site - www.ncsu.edu/woIfline and subscribe to the listserv for the most up-to- 
date information about park and ride lots and locations, bus routes and schedules. 

Currently, NC State Transportation plans on extending a pilot U-Pass program which entitles all students, faculty and staff to ride any 
Capital Area Transit (CAT) or Triangle Transit Authority (TTA) bus for free, using the NC State ID card as a boarding pass. 

Transportation is located in the Administrative Services Center, 2711 Sullivan Drive, Room 139, box 7221, Raleigh, NC, 27695- 
7221,(919)515-3424. 




51 



North Carolina State University 



NC STATE STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The university makes every effort to provide surroundings that are pleasant and conducive to intellectual and personal growth. In 
addition, a wide variety of athletic, cultural and social opportunities are available to students. Through the services and activities 
affiliated with campus life, as well as through extracurricular organizations and functions, students at NC State may acquire 
experience in group leadership and community living to supplement and enrich their education. 

Student Government 

Every NC State student is a member of a community that exercises executive, legislative and judicial authority in matters of student 
life. Students have a voice in government through participation in campus-wide elections of officers and legislators and may apply to 
serve in the judicial branch. 

Clubs and Societies 

Honorary. University-wide honorary societies include Golden Chain, senior leadership; Thirty and Three, junior leadership; Phi Eta 
Sigma and Alpha Lambda Delta, freshman scholarship; Gamma Beta Phi, scholarship and service; and Phi Beta Kappa and Phi 
Kappa Phi, junior, senior and graduate student scholarship. 

Professional and Technical Organizations. The colleges and departments sponsor or supervise a large number of professional and 
technical societies and clubs. These organizations contribute substantially to the students' professional and social growth. 

Greek Life (Fraternities and Sororities). There are over 40 Greek letter organizations at NC State University, and four pillars guide 
each: Leadership, Scholarship, Service, and Sisterhood/Brotherhood. While the fraternal values of each organization are similar at the 
core, each organization expresses itself through its unique membership. At State, we also have social fraternities and sororities, 
historically African-American, Native-American, and Latino fraternities and sororities, Greek letter organizations that recruit by 
academic focus, and those which are formed over common interest such as multiculturalism. 

Regardless of affiliation, being Greek means more that just wearing Greek letters, attending meetings, and going to parties. Being in 
a fraternity/sorority is about making friendships that will last far beyond your college years while enhancing your personal 
development by committing to ideals of scholarship, leadership, and service. It is being respected for your individuality while being 
part of a brotherhood/sisterhood with individuals who share the same goals and values. Your brothers/sisters are there to support you, 
making your transition to college easy and fiin. 

Membership is a solemn commitment. Joining a fraternity or sorority is a lifelong dedication to the ideals and principals of Greek life. 
Greek men and women are successful in life because the values learned during the undergraduate years of affiliation continue to be 
put into action long after graduation. 

For more information on membership, educational programming or service opportunities, visit the Department of Greek Life's web 
site at www.ncsu.edu/greekjife, the office in 1104 Pullen Hall, or call (919)513-2910. 

Pershing Rifles. This is a professional and social fraternity open to students enrolled in any ROTC courses. Members of the Pershing 
Rifles participate in ceremonies such as the Color Guard for NC State athletic events and Pennant Guard for home football games. 
Pledge period is one semester, and focuses on the history and traditions of the Pershing Rifles, as well as technical ability in the 
mastery of drill and ceremonies. 

The Ranger Challenge Team. Open to all members of the Wolfpack Battalion. Members participate in intercollegiate competitions 
of military skills, including rifle marksmanship, hand grenades, ruck marching, patrolling, weapons assembly, the APFT, and rope 
bridge construction. NC State's Ranger Challenge Team is consistently one for the best on the east coast. Sponsored by Army ROTC, 
it competes against other schools in North and South Carolina, as well as schools on the east coast. 

Other Organizations. There are over 300 other student organizations. Students interested in exploring these organizations or in 
creating a new organization, may contact the Student Organizations Resources Center, Box 7306, Room 1202 Talley Student Center, 
(919)515-3323; www.ncsu.edu/sorc. 

Student Media 

NC State students have the opportunity to produce and manage a variety of student-oriented media. By working with these media, 
students may gain valuable extracurricular experience in journalism, broadcasting, production, design, leadership and management. 
There are six media statTed by students and supported in large part by a designed portion of each student's non-academic fees. They 
are governed by an advisory board with elected student members. Many staff positions are paid. 

The Agromeck. the university's yearbook, is published in the fall and provides a record in words and pictures of student and campus 
activities during the past year. Student staff members include photojoumalists, writers, designers and editors, all with a common 
mission - to document the history of the university, www.ncsu.edu/agromeck 

Americana, the university's online journal, features art, essays, poetry and editorials about a wide variety of topics. 
wwvv.americana.ncsu.edu 

The Nubian Message provides news and features about the African-American community at NC State, www.ncsu.edu/nubian 

52 



North Carolina State University 



Technician, the university's oldest student newspaper, is published daily when school is in session during the Fall and Spring 
Semesters and weekly during the summer, www.technicianonline.com 

The Windhover, the campus literary and visual arts magazine, is published each spring. It has received numerous national awards, 
including the Pacemaker from the Associated Collegiate Press, www.ncsu.edu/windhover 

WKNC (88.1 FM), the student radio station, operates at 25,000 watts and streams online enabling it to be heard all over Wake and 
adjoining counties as well as around the world. The station operates 24 hours a day, using state-of-the-art computers and audio 
technology with a staff of engineers, disc jockeys and news personnel, www.wknc.org. 

Several of the colleges have their own publications dealing with material of special interest to students in these areas. The 
publications include Agriculture and Life Sciences' Agri-Life, Forest Resources' Pi-Ne-Tum; Engineering's The Southern Engineer, 
Textiles' The Textile Forum; Design's The Publications of the School of Design; and Physical and Mathematical Sciences' The 
Scientist. 

Center for Student Leadership, Ethics, and Public Service 

The Center's mission is to provide leadership development and service opportunities for students who aspire to be principled, 
innovative, and socially conscious contributors to a caring and civil society. 

The Center offers the Leadership Development Series (LDS), which consists of over 40 non-credit workshops that focus on different 
aspects of leadership. Students have the opportunity to earn a Visionary Leaders Certificate and a Leadership Transcript, a dynamic 
resume supplement that infonns employers of your commitment to developing personal leadership skills. 

Each year we honor an outstanding regional, national, or international leader who inspires us with their personal view of leadership 
and the challenges today's ethical leaders encounter through the Role Model Leaders' Forum. The Leadership Library contains over 
300 leadership reference materials available for checkout (books, audio cassettes, videotapes, newsletters). A complete listing is 
available on-line, www.ncsu.edu/csleps. Students can participate in domestic and international Alternative Fall and Spring Break 
Service-Learning trips which challenge students to help those in need while relating what they have learned in the classroom to the 
outside world. 

Students can also participate in The LeaderShape Institute - a six-day leadership development experience designed to help 
participants learn to "lead with integrity" and work towards developing visions for positive change. 

We encourage students to become Service-Leadership Consultants (SLCs) who are trained to provide dynamic leadership 
development and training experiences to individuals and organizations. 

Also, we list more than 150 service opportunities on our web site. For further information and a complete listing of our offerings, 
please stop by 31 15 Talley Student Center, (919)515-9248 or visit, www.ncsu.edu.csleps. 



Department of Campus Activities 

The Department of Campus Activities includes the Union Activities Board and Campus 
Cinema, Parents & Families Services, Student Handbook, WolfCamp, and the Student 
Organization Resource Center (SOURCE.) 

The Union Activities Board (UAB) is a student-directed programming network of four 
committees that plan and implement a variety of programs for the campus community, 
including the Films Committee (that schedules films for Campus Cinema), Leisure & 
Entertainment Committee, Issues and Ideas Committee, and the Diversity Committee, 
which has two subcommittees: the Black Students Board and the International 
Activities Council. 

Parents and Families Services provides resources and programming for families of 
NC State students including Parents' Orientation, Parents and Families Weekend, Pack 
Parents newsletters and the Parents' Helpline. 



^^ 



NC STATE UNIVERSITY 

Campus Activities 



WolfCamp is a supplementary program to New Student Orientation that otTers first year students the opportunity to get better 
acquainted with the campus, their peers and upperclass mentors and faculty. WolfCampers participate in programs on history and 
traditions of NC State, academic success skills and diversity appreciation. 

The Student Organization Resource Center (SOURCE) provides registration and support for the over 300 organizations available 
to NC State students, including mailboxes, meeting space and computer services, as well as pennits for solicitation and public 
gatherings, among many others. 



53 



North Carolina State University 




The Women's Center 

Known for their warm and welcoming atmosphere, the Women's Center and their resources are open to women 
and men. The Women's Center also provides time and space for support of network groups to meet in a safe, 
supportive atmosphere. Informal advising and consulting on advocacy issues for women, referrals to campus 
and community resources are services the Women's Center otTers. In addition, the Women's Center offers 
support and assistance in dealing with problems such as se.xual harassment, rape and sexual assault and dating 
or relationship issues. 

The Women's Center has a full range of audiovisual and computer equipment, and can schedule meeting space 
for organizations and events by faculty, stalTand students. 

In all of its activities, the Women's Center strives to promote the awareness of racial, cultural and ethnic 
perspectives both locally and globally. Programs reflect a wide range of viewpoints about women's concerns 
and gender equality; www.ncsu.edu/womens_center/. 

If you are a person with disability and desire any assistive devices, services or other accommodations to participate in Women's 
Center activities, please contact us at (919)515-2012 during business hours (8:00am to 5:00pm) to discuss accommodations at least 
72 hours prior to the event. 

Facilities 

Talley Student Center is the location for a variety of facilities, programs, and services designed to offer rest, relaxation and 
recreation, as well as cultural, social, leadership and artistic development. Facilities in the Talley Student Center building include 
Stewart Theatre, several lounge areas, the Wolves Den Game Room; and a variety of dining opportunities, including the Wolves Den, 
Commons Cafe and the Emporium Convenience Store. The Talley Student Center has 18 meeting and activity rooms, which are 
available for reser\ation to all campus organizations, with access to catering and audio-visual services. Program offices include the 
Chaplains" Cooperative Ministry, Student Legal Services, and University Dining administrative and catering offices. Service areas 
include the Reservations and Events management Offices, Information Center, and Ticket Central. 

VVitherspoon Student Center (WSC) houses the African-American Cultural Center, Student Government Offices, the Media 
Authority and offices of si.\ student-run media organizations - Americana (online journal), Agromeck (yearbook). The Nubian 
Message and Technician (newspapers). Windhover (literary magazine), and WKNC FM 88.1 (radio station). 

The WSC also includes several lounge areas, including two balconies; one meeting room available by reservation; the African- 
American Cultural Center's Multi-Purpose Room, Gallery and Library; and the Campus Cinema, used for films, lectures, and special 
events. 

Price Music Center is the location for the Music Department and its programs. 

Thompson Building is the location for University Theatre and The Crafts Center. 

Arts NC State ^ 

The six visual and performing arts programs of ARTS NC STATE - Center Stage, the Crafts Center, the 
Dance Program, the Gallery of Art & Design, Department of Music, and University Theatre - provide 
opportunities for our students and our community to explore, learn, create, and grow. Whether through 
academic courses, cutting-edge performances or the preservation of traditional crafts, ARTS NC STATE 
educates our students for the 2 1 st century while providing a living link to our rich cultural heritage. For 
additional information, please visit the following web site: www.ncsu.edu/arts 



ARTS 



Center Stage at Stewart Theatre 

Experience live, world-class performances at Center Stage. NC State's professional performing arts 

series. Most shows take place in Stewart Theatre, located inside the Talley Student Center. A typical 

Center Stage season features outstanding artists from a wide range of disciplines, including jazz, world 

music, modem dance, drama and comedy. Discounted tickets are available to NC State students, faculty, 

and staffi as well as parents of current NC State students. (Contact: 513-30.30) N C S 1 A 1 E 

The Crafts Center 

The Crafts Center is an extraordinary 20,000+ square foot educational facility. Considered to be one of the finest on any university 
campus. The Crafts Center has served students and the community for over four decades! Students can participate in any of more than 
100 classes offered annually in art, pottery, photography, fibers, woodworking, glass, lapidary, telescope mirror making, and more. 
Classes, weekend workshops, and short courses are ofTered at all levels for the beginning student as well as the accomplished artist. 
Work side by side with other students, stall, faculty, and community artists and gain inspiration while utilizing studio space in wood, 
clay, glass, metals, lapidary, optics, photography or weaving. The Crafts Center Gallery showcases both traditional and contemporary 
craft exhibitions, many featuring the enormous breadth of artistic talent found in our region. Everyone is invited to become a member 
of this supportive artists' community! The atmosphere is relaxed and welcoming, providing a great place to meet people, to share 
new experiences and to learn about the creative process. (Contact: 515-2457) 



54 



North Carolina State University 



Dance Program 

The NC State Dance Program offers opportunities in performance through two student companies: the NCSU Dance Company and 
Dance Visions. The NCSU Dance Company, a modem dance company, and DanceVisions, whose repertoire ranges from modem to 
hip hop, are both open by audition, present annual spring concerts, and perform in many other venues on and off campus throughout 
the year. The Dance Program presents the Student Concert, an annual formal concert dedicated to choreography by NC State student 
artists who create their work in an independent study course with a group workshop component. The Dance Program also sponsors 
the Professional Projects Program, offers master classes and special programs, and works cooperatively with the NC State 
Department of Physical Education in offering academic classes in dance. (Contact: 515-7034) 

Gallery of Art and Design 

The Gallery of Art & Design is NC State's museum and houses its growing collection of contemporary and historical examples of 
ceramics, textiles, glass, furniture, photography, folk and outsider art, and works on paper by artists from every continent. The 
collection provides the context and inspiration for an annual series of changing exhibitions of regional, national and intemational 
significance. The collection, exhibitions and associated interpretative programs give the NC State community and the state unique 
access to work in these media. 

The Gallery is located on the south side of the Talley Student Center at 3302 Cates Avenue. Exhibitions in the Foundations and 
Cannon Galleries are free and open to the public. The collection database is accessible through the Gallery web site, www.ncsu.edu/ 
gad. Student internships for course credit are offered each semester. Faculty, student groups and the public may schedule tours or 
arrange visits to the permanent collection by calling the Gallery's Administrative Offices. (Contact: 515-3503) 

Music Department 

The Music Department offers both performing ensembles and academic courses for the music minor program and elective credit. 
(Also see Department of Music) For description of the academic courses, consult the NC State University Course Catalog. 

Performing Ensembles. A wide variety of perfomiing ensembles provide opportunities for participants to develop artistically and 
intellectually through applied music. In performance, the ensembles play an important part in campus life, presenting public concerts 
and performing at official functions and athletic events. Music ensembles receive one academic credit which may be used to satisfy 
free elective requirements in any academic major. Membership in all ensembles requires an audition with the instmctor. 

Choral Ensembles. The Choral program offers students from all academic areas an opportunity to participate in the exploration and 
performance of the highest quality of choral repertoire spanning five centuries. The ensembles include Chamber Singers, Concert 
Choir (including Men's Glee Club, Women's Glee Club), University Singers, and The New Horizons Choir. Performance highlights 
have included concert tours of the Eastem United States, France, and Italy, performances with the North Carolina Symphony and 
Duke Symphony Orchestras, appearances at the North Carolina Music Educators Conference, as well as fall and spring concerts both 
on and off campus. 

NC State Pipes and Drums. Students may play the bagpipes, an instmment known to many of North Carolina's earliest settlers, in 
order to represent the university through this unique and distinctive medium. Pipes, dmms, and other equipment are furnished. 
Beginning pipe and drum lessons are available to students without previous experience. 

Orchestras. The Raleigh Civic Symphony and Chamber Orchestra combine student and community musicians with professional 
leaders, presenting concerts of innovative programming on campus and in other Triangle Area venues. Area professionals serve as 
concertmaster, principal cellist, and guest coaches, providing high-level instruction and leadership to community and student players. 
Both orchestras are on the same artistic level and require an audition with the conductor. 

Wind Ensembles. The wind program includes the Wind Ensemble, Concert Band, Jazz Ensembles, British Brass Band, Marching 
Band and Pep Band. The Marching Band is active during football season; the Pep Bands during basketball season. Other bands and 
ensembles usually meet both semesters. Placement in a band or ensemble is made according to student ability and interest. 

Piano. Beginning piano classes are offered to students from all academic areas for credit. No previous experience is required. Honors 
sections of class piano are available for beginning piano students who are music minors, or who qualify by departmental approval. 
Private lessons are offered to advanced piano students who have passed an audition and are admitted to the music minor program in 
piano performance. 

University Theatre 

University Theatre is the university's volunteer student theatre, housed within the Division of Student Affairs. Each season, in five 
main-stage shows, the summer Theatrefest, Madrigal Dinner, and other special productions, the sold-out audiences see on stage the 
result of hours of work, weeks of exploration, and months of preparation. Guided by a professional staff, students on stage and behind 
stage present shows that gamer the highest praise from loyal audiences and enthusiastic reviewers. University Theatre offers a blend 
of student volunteer productions and academic theatre training. Productions are open to all NC State students, whether or not they are 
enrolled in theatre courses. Classes are available in acting, directing, introduction to theatre, and all areas of technical theatre, 
including stagecraft, costume, make-up, lighting, and scenic design. Students may receive a theatre minor through the 
communication department. Student theatre organizations, open to all NC State students, include Alpha Psi Omega and Black 
Repertory Theatre. Contact: 515-2405 or 515-3927 



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North Carolina State University 



Ticket Central 

Ticket Central serves as the centralized box office for ARTS NC STATE, and other campus and community events. Ticket Central 
tickets events in a variety ofperfomiance venues including Stewart Theatre, Thompson Theatre, the Talley Student Center, and 
Witherspoon Student Center. The bo.\ office is located on the second floor of the Talley Student Center Normal hours of operation 
are Monday-Friday 12-8pm and Saturdays l2-5pm. Hours vary during university holidays and during the summer. Tickets may be 
purchased in person or by calling 515-11 00. 




Intercollegiate Athletics - Go Pack! 

The university's "Wolfpack" athletic teams are nationally recognized and 
enjoy a tradition of excellence as they compete in the prestigious Atlantic 
Coast Conference. The men's basketball team won national championships in 
1974 and in 1983 and holds 10 ACC titles. The Pack has been to the NCAA 
Tournament two of the past three years under Coach Herb Sendek. The 
football team has been the Atlantic Coast Conference champion five times, 
co-champion twice, and has played in 22 bowl games, including four in the 
past four years since Chuck Amato took over as head coach. 

The Wolfpack women's cross country team won national championships in 
1979 and 1980 along with 19 ACC crowns. The men's cross country team has 
won the ACC title 9 times, while the men's and women's soccer teams have 
both advanced to the NCAA's "Final Four" in the last eight years. The 
women's basketball team, led by 1988 United States Olympic gold medal- 
winning and Naismith Hall of Fame coach Kay Yow, has advanced to the 
NCAA "Sweet 16" 10 times. Yow has over 600 career wins. 

The wrestling team has won 12 ACC titles while the cheerleading squad has been recognized 3 times as national champions. NC 
State student-athletes have won numerous conference, NCAA and All-American athletic and academic honors, including medals in 
six Olympic Games. 

The Department of Athletics conducts the university's intercollegiate athletics program which includes 23 varsity sports, 12 men's, 1 1 
women's. The athletics program is administered by the Athletics Director, Lee Fowler. The Council on Athletics is appointed by the 
Chancellor and serves in an advisory capacity to the Director of Athletics and the Chancellor. 

The athletics program is self-supporting and is operated primarily through gate receipts, radio and television revenues, NCAA 
distributions, and student fees. Funds for athletics grants-in-aid are provided through the North Carolina State Student Aid 
Association (Wolfpack Club). 

Men's varsity sports include soccer, cross country, and football in the fall: basketball, swimming, indoor track, and wrestling in the 
winter; and outdoor track, golf, tennis, and baseball in the spring. Varsity sports for wv.,men include soccer, cross-country, and 
volleyball in the fall; basketball, indoor track, swimming, and gymnastics in the winter; and track, golf Softball and tennis in the 
spring. The coed rifle team competes during the winter. 

A S100+ million facilities development plan, now well underway, is due to be completed by 2006. Carter-Finley Football Stadium 
permanent seating has been increased to 5 1 ,500 while a state-of-the art 1 06,000 square foot Murphy Football Center was completed 
in 2003. The men's basketball team plays in the RBC Center, which seats 19.700. Reynolds Coliseum (12,400) is used for women's 
basketball, women's gymnastics and volleyball competition. 

A $5 million renovation of Doak Baseball Field (3,800) was completed in March 2003 as well as construction of a new Wolfpack 
Tennis Complex with four indoor courts. Paul Derr Track Stadium (3,000) is being redesigned to accommodate men's and women's 
soccer and a women's softball complex. 

The Case Athletics Center is being converted to house Academic Support Services for Student-Athletes. 
Wolfpack athletics administrative offices and coaches' offices are primarily housed in the Weisiger Brown 
General Athletics Facility with coaches ofllces also located in Reynolds Coliseum, the Murphy Football 
Center, the Wolfpack Tennis Complex and Doak Field. 

The flindrasing offices of the Wolfpack Club and the athletic department marketing and ticket ofTlces are 
located near Carter-Finley Stadium at 5400 Trinity Rd. (Suite 500). Raleigh. NC 27607. For ticket 
information call (919)515-2106 or 1 -800-3 10-Pack. The main athletic department receptionist; 515-2101. 
Visit the official athletic department web site for complete information; www.gopack.com/ 




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North Carolina State University 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

The program in General Education established the foundation for a lifetime of intellectual discovery, personal development, and 
community service while preparing students for advanced work in various academic and professional disciplines. Through the 
teaching of courses offered in each of the following subject areas as well as in the delivery of the academic disciplines, the General 
Education program will: 

1 . Provide instruction that enables students to master basic concepts of a broad array of the intellectual disciplines, 

2. Help students develop versatility of mind, an ability to examine problems individually and collaboratively from multiple 
perspectives, including ethical and aesthetic perspectives, 

3. Provide students the guidance and skills necessary to become intellectually disciplined, to be able to construct arguments 
that are clear, precise, accurate, and of relevant depth and breadth, 

4. Encourage students to take personal responsibility for their education, including the ability to find, evaluate and 
communicate new information, setting the stage for life-long learning. 

For the most current information available, please see the following web site: www.ncsu.edu/provost/academic jjrograms/ger. 

Mathematical Sciences 

Rationale: A logical approach to problem solving is important for successful functioning in society. It is also important that students 
be able to formulate models, be critical consumers of quantitative information, communicate mathematically and solve problems. 

Objectives for courses in the category of Mathematics: Each course in the Mathematical Sciences category of the General 
Education Requirements will provide instruction and guidance that help students to: 

1 . improve and refine mathematical problem-solving abilities; and 

2. develop logical reasoning skills. 

Natural Sciences 

Rationale: The natural sciences pursue basic questions about the workings of the universe, and the richness, variety and 
interconnectedness of the world around us. Students today are exposed to an increasing volume of information, from a large variety 
of sources, in diverse and changing formats. Training in the natural sciences is essential to help students develop skills to distinguish 
between testable and un-testable ideas, recognize scientifically valid tests of theories, and understand how information relates to 
those tests. By studying the natural sciences, students learn to reason both inductively and deductively, develop and test scientific 
hypotheses, and understand the value and limitations of scientific studies. The development and application of new technologies 
require scientifically literate citizens who can understand technological issues and evaluate the role of science in society's debate of 
those issues. 

Objectives for courses in the category of Natural Sciences: Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education 
Requirements will provide instruction and guidance that help the student to: 

1. use the methods and processes of science in testing hypotheses, solving problems and making decisions; and 

2. articulate, make inferences from, and apply to problem solving, scientific concepts, principles, laws, and theories. 

Minimum Requirements in Mathematical and Natural Science for all Curricula (20 hours) 

A total of six courses (20 hours) in the mathematical and natural sciences. 

1. Two courses (6 hours) selected from mathematics, statistics, and logic; one must be a mathematics course. 

2. Three courses ( 1 1 hours) from the natural sciences; two from different basic sciences (biology, chemistry, earth sciences, 
and physics); two of the three courses must have a laboratory. 

3. The sixth course (3 hours) selected from any of the mathematical science, natural science, or science, technology and society 
courses. 

Writing, Speaking and Informational Technology 

Rationale: Writing and speaking are powerful ways of understanding ourselves and the world in which we live. It is through writing 
and speaking that the various disciplines and professions define the knowledge and methodologies that characterize them. And 
because effective writing and speaking in academic and professional settings often demand proficiency in the use of information 
technologies and resources, students must have a basic understanding of how information is identified and defined by experts, 
structured, organized, and accessed, in both the print and digital environments. Mastery of communication arts and information skills 
is central to engaging in the productive life of academic and professional communities. 



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North Carolina State University 



Objectives for courses in the category of Writing, Speaking and Information Literacy: Each course in the Writing and Speaking 
category of the General Education Requirements will provide instruction and guidance that help students to: 

1 . communicate effectively in specific writing or speaking situations, which may include various academic, professional, or 
civic situations; and 

2. understand and respond appropriately to the critical elements that shape communication situations, such as audience, 
purpose, and genre; and 

3. critique their own writing or speaking and provide effective and useful feedback to enable other students to improve their 
writing or speaking; and 

4. demonstrate critical and evaluative thinking skills in locating, analyzing, synthesizing, and using information in writing or 
speaking activities. 

Minimum Requirements in Writing and Speaking for all Curricula (7 hours) 

1 . One semester of composition and rhetoric during the freshman year. 

2. One semester from any of the following: 

a) advanced writing, 

b) speech, or 

c) foreign language (FL 201 or higher in the student's first foreign language or any FL course in a second language). 

3. In addition, each curriculum is designed so that upper-level courses and other programmatic experiences help students write 
and speak competently in the discipline, including the ability to retrieve, evaluate, and manage information in ways that are 
appropriate to the discipline. In each curriculum, the design and delivery of that support are guided by various forms of 
programmatic assessment. 

Humanities and Social Sciences 

Rationale: The humanities and the social sciences comprise the subjects and disciplines that use various modes of rational inquiry to 
understand human nature and experience, organization and change in human societies, the nature of the world, and rational inquiry 
itself An education in the humanities and social sciences requires reading significant works, gaining an exposure to a variety of 
methodologies, and learning to apply these in written exposition. An education in the basic humanistic disciplines is a necessary part 
of being truly educated — of becoming a citizen with a broad knowledge of human cultures and with well-considered moral, 
philosophical, aesthetic, and intellectual convictions. 

Objectives for courses in the category of Humanities and Social Sciences: Each course in the general humanities category of the 
General Education Requirements will provide instruction and guidance that help students to: 

1 . understand and engage in the human experience through the interpretation of human culture and artifacts (this objective 
must be the central focus of each humanities course); and 

2. become aware of the act of interpretation itself as a critical form of knowing in the humanities; and 

3. make academic arguments about the human experience using reasons and evidence for supporting those reasons that are 
appropriate to the humanities. 

In addition, each course appearing on one of the specific humanities and social science lists meets the objectives for the 
specific category as detailed below: 

Literature: The study of literature introduces students to the many ways of deriving meaning from the human condition and to the 
many forms in which meaning is expressed. Studying literature also develops students' capacity for critical analysis and personal 
expression, their aesthetic sensitivity, and their reading and writing skills. 

Objectives for courses in the category of Literature: Each course within the Literature category of the General Education 
Requirements in the Humanities will provide instruction and guidance that help students to: 

1 . understand and engage in the human experience through the interpretation of literature (this objective must be the central 
focus of each literature course); and 

2. become aware of the act of interpretation itself as a critical form of knowing in the study of literature; and 

3. make scholarly arguments about literature using reasons and ways of supporting those reasons that are appropriate to the 
field of study. 

Objectives for courses in the category of History: The study of history provides an understanding of continuities and changes in 
human thought and behavior and of the ongoing process in which individuals shape and are shaped by their societies and their 
governments. Studying history also provides training in the analysis of process and the evaluation of a wide variety of evidence. 



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North Carolina State University 



Each course in the History category of the General Education Requirements will provide instruction and guidance that help students 
to: 

1 . understand and engage in the human experience through the interpretation of evidence from the past situated in geotemporal 
context (this objective must be the central focus of each history course); and 

2. become aware of the act of historical interpretation itself, through which historians use varieties of evidence to offer 
perspectives on the meaning of the past; and 

3. make academic arguments about history using reasons and evidence for supporting those reasons that are appropriate to the 
field of study. 

Philosophy: In the study of philosophy, students are exposed to the rigorous procedures of philosophical thought, to ethical issues, 
and to the insights of ethical reasoning. 

Objectives for courses in the category of Philosophy: Each course in the Philosophy category of the General Education 
Requirements will provide instruction and guidance that help students to: 

1 . understand and engage in the human experience through the philosophical study of human thought, human values, and the 
world (this objective must be the central focus of each philosophy course); and 

2. become aware of the acts of understanding and engagement itself as critical parts of the study of philosophy; and 

3. make philosophical arguments using reasons and ways of supporting those reasons that are appropriate to the field of study. 

Religion: In the study of religions, students are introduced to beliefs of their own and other cultures, and they learn how various 
religions have resolved ethical issues and have addressed the human condition. 

Objectives for courses in the category of Religion: Each course in the Religion category of the General Education Requirements 
will provide instruction and guidance that help students to: 

1. understand and engage in the human experience through the interpretation of religious cultures and artifacts (this objective 
must be the central focus of each religion course); and 

2. become aware of the act of interpretation itself as a critical form of knowing in the study of religion; and 

3. make arguments about religion using reasons and ways of supporting those reasons that are appropriate to the field of study. 

Visual and Performing Arts: Courses in the visual and performing arts deal with aesthefic, personal, practical, and cultural 
significance of the fine and applied arts. The visual and performing arts develop students' aesthetic sensitivities, critical judgment, 
and personal creativity. They also provide students with an understanding of the cultural and historical dimensions of artistic 
expression. 

Objectives for courses in the category of Visual and Performing Arts: Each course in the Visual and Perfomiing Arts category of 
the General Education Requirements will provide instruction and guidance that help students to: 

1. deepen their understanding of aesthetic, cultural, and historical dimensions of artistic traditions; and 

2. strengthen their ability to interpret and make critical judgments about the arts through the analysis of structure, form, and 
style of specific works; and 

3. strengthen their ability to create, recreate, or evaluate art based upon techniques and standards appropriate to the genre. 

Social Sciences: The study of social sciences enables students to understand individual and collective human behavior by exploring 
meaning within a variety of social, cultural and political contexts; by analyzing the structures within which human goals are 
established and human choices are made; and by applying theoretical and quantitative models to specific cases. 

Objectives for courses in the category of Social Sciences: Each course in the Social Science category of the General Education 
Requirements will provide instruction and guidance that help students to: 

1 . understand at least one of the following: human behavior, mental processes, organizational processes, or institutional 
processes; and 

2. understand how social scientific methods may be applied to the study of human behavior, mental processes, organizational 
processes, or institutional processes; and 

3. use theories or concepts of the social sciences to understand real-world problems, including the underlying origins of such 
problems. 



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North Carolina State University 



Minimum Requirements in Humanities and Social Sciences for all Curricula (2! hours) 

The general education requirements in the llunianities and Social Sciences are designed to expose students to content areas that 
demonstrate the relevant modes of inquiry: 

1 . One course in the study of literature (3 hours). 

2. One course in the study of philosophy, religion, or history (3 hours). 

3. One course in the study of visual and performing arts (3 hours). This requirement may alternatively be fulfilled by taking a 
course in history. 

4. Two courses from ditTerent content areas, in the study of psychology, economics, politics and government, sociology, 
anthropology, and cultural geography (6 hours). 

5. Two additional courses selected within Humanities and Social Sciences (6 hours). These hours could be used to pursue 
specific interests, to provide additional breadth or depth by taking courses focused on a common theme. 

6. Among the courses selected to fulfill the Humanities and Social Sciences requirement at last one must focus on a non- 
English speaking culture. 

Foreign Language 

Rationale: In a sense, languages are keys to the world. The continuous expansion of international relations makes the knowledge of 
foreign languages increasingly significant. In learning a foreign language and studying its literature and cultures, students acquire a 
body of knowledge about how humans think, view the world, express themselves, and communicate with one another. 

Language learning also expands one's ability to create and discover new meaning in one's own language and culture. Knowledge of 
the linguistic structures of a second language helps students to understand their own language better. Likewise, an awareness of 
contrasting cultural concepts sensitizes students to the differences between their own culture and others. 

Such awareness has become increasingly important as the communities of the world have become more interconnected and 
interdependent. The needs of our global society require that more citizens have access to other languages and cultures in order to 
cooperate in the process of improving the quality of human life. 

Minimum Requirements in Foreign Language for all Curricula 

1 . Two years of high school foreign language are required as a prerequisite for admission to the university. 

2. Foreign language proficiency at the FL 102 level is required for graduation. 

Physical Education 

Rationale: The development of attitudes and skills for a healthy life is essential to a university student's education. In addition to 
developing and gaining an appreciation of health-related fitness and wellness concepts and fundamental motor skills, student 
participation in physical activities and sport significantly decreases major health risks, reduces stress from the pressures of academic 
life, and improves general social and mental well-being. 

Objectives for courses in the category of Physical Education: Each course in the Physical Education category of the General 
Education Requirements will provide instruction and guidance that help students to: 

1 . learn the fundamentals of health-related fitness, encompassing cardio-respiratory and cardiovascular endurance, muscular 
strength and endurance, muscular flexibility and body composition: and 

2. apply knowledge of the fundamentals of health-related fitness toward developing, maintaining, and sustaining an active and 
healthy lifestyle: and 

3. acquire or enhance the basic motor skills and skill-related competencies, concepts, and strategies of physical activities and 
sport; and 

4. gain a thorough working knowledge, appreciation, and understanding of the spirit and rules, history, safety, and etiquette of 
physical activities and sport. 

Minimum Requirements in Physical Education for all Curricula 

Two credit hours, one each in physical education 

1 . Two courses including one Fitness and Wellness course. 

2. All courses will be available on a/an S/U basis. 

Science, Technology and Society 

Rationale: North Carolina State University, as a land-grant university, has a mission that stresses the application of science and 
technology for the betterment of humankind. It is essential, therefore, that students be exposed to the vital interactions among 
science, technology, society, and the quality of life. 



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North Carolina State University 



Objectives for courses in tiie category of Science, Technology & Society: Courses fulfilling the Science, Technology & Society 
requirement should have as a central instructional focus the following objectives. To provide sustained, rigorous, and substantive 
instruction, efforts to meet the GER Science, Technology & Society objectives should be evident across the entire syllabus and be 
reflected in course lectures, discussion, readings, projects, assignments, etc. Each course in the Science, Technology & Society 
category of the GER will provide instruction and guidance that help students to: 

1. develop an understanding of the mutual relationships between science or technology and societies, including the effects of 
or the effects on cultures, values, industries, governments, or other facets of those societies. 

2. develop an ability to critically evaluate information regarding these mutual relationships, recognizing that the information 
may come from a variety of sources and perspectives. 

Minimum Requirements in Science, Technology and Society for all Curricula 

Courses which satisfy this requirement can be oriented toward science and technology or toward the humanities and social sciences. 
Students in science and technology should study this topic from a humanities and social sciences perspective. Students with majors in 
the humanities and social sciences should study this topic from a science and technology perspective. This course can also partially 
satisfy either the humanities and social sciences requirement or the mathematical and natural sciences requirement (#3) but not both. 
This requirement can be satisfied by an interdisciplinary course designed to cover both perspectives. 

Computer Literacy 

Rationale: Today's graduate must have a knowledge of information technology and computer applications. Every student needs a 
basic understanding of information processing. It is not necessary that every student be a programmer. Students should develop and 
demonstrate proficiency in the use of computers, learning to use applications such as word processing, spreadsheets, database 
management programs, e-mail, and packages and applications specific to their field of study. 

The following may be used to fulfill computer literacy instruction: 

1. instruction and assignments required within courses, and/or 

2. required use of a computer to complete assignments. 



61 



COLLEGE OF 

AGRICULTURE 

AND LIFE SCIENCES 




115 Patterson Hall 

NCSU Box 7642 

Raleigh, NC 27695-7642 

phone: (919)515-2614 

fax: (919)515-5266 

e-mail: cals_pro}»rams(fl)ncsu.edu 

www.cals.ncsu.edu 



Johnny C. Wynne. Interim Dean and Executive Director for Agricultural Programs 

Kenneth L. Esbenshade. Associate Dean and Director for Academic Programs 

John C. Cornvvell, Associate Director of Academic Programs. Director of AgricuUural Institute 

Barbara M. Kirby. Assistant Director of Academic Programs 

Brenda P. Alston-Mills. Coordinator of CALS Diversity Programs 

Marcy L. Bullock. Directorof Career Services 



College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 



Academic programs in the college represent a unique blending of the agriculture and life sciences. Agriculture is a very diverse 
industry that touches everyone's life in some way or another. The life sciences provide foundations for studying medical and health- 
related disciplines as well as environmental experiences and molecular biology. 

The goals of the instructional program in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences include proving relevant, scientific, and 
practical knowledge of the food, agricultural, and life sciences to its students. These programs emanate from a highly qualified and 
accomplished faculty committed to academic excellence and the development of the individuals to their personal and professional 
potential. Central to the college's goals is the cultivation of interdisciplinary problem-solving skills that will serve its graduates well 
as they pursue a lifetime of learning and adaptation to change. 

The overall objectives of the academic program include: 

• To provide an opportunity for a broad university education 

• To provide a variety of learning experiences 

• To offer a choice of specialization in agriculture and life sciences 

• To provide background for graduate or professional programs 

Degrees 

• The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred upon the completion of one of the curricula in this college. 

The degrees of Master of Science, Master of Agriculture and Master of Life Sciences are offered in the various departments in 
the college. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered in the following subject areas: animal science, biochemistry, bio-informatics, 
biological and agricultural engineering, botany, crop science, economics, entomology, financial mathematics, food science, 
functional genomics, genetics, horticultural science, immunology, microbiology, nutrition, physiology, plant pathology, 
sociology, soil science, toxicology, and zoology. 

♦Further information on graduate offerings may be found in the Graduate Catalog. 
Curriculum Offerings and Requirements 

A freshman enrolling in Agriculture and Life Sciences has common core courses. The first year-courses are appropriate in all 
curricula. This approach allows the student time to explore various programs before selecting a curriculum. The student selects a 
major in a department or interdisciplinary program. All departments offer science curricula (intended primarily for students who 
anticipate attending graduate or professional school), several technology curricula, and the Agricultural Business Management 
curriculum is offered in the Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Departmental Majors 

Business-agricultural/business management is offered through the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics. A 
concentration in biological sciences and the opportunity for double majoring in business and other programs are available. 

Science, animal science, agricultural and extension education, applied sociology, biochemistry, biological engineering (joint program 
with the College of Engineering), biological sciences, botany, fisheries and wildlife sciences (joint program with the College of 
Natural Resources) food science, horticultural science, microbiology, poultry science, and zoology. Preprofessional courses are 
offered in the science curriculum track. Technology agricultural and environmental technology, animal science, food science, 
horticultural science and poultry science. 

Freshman Year 

The curricula in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences have a common freshman year with the exception of the science 
program otTered through the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. For the fi"eshman year of that curriculum, see 
the College of Engineering. 



63 



College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 



Academic Minors 

Several departments in the College of Agriculture and Lite Sciences offer a minor in their discipline. Students interested in additional 
information regarding a minor should contact the appropriate departmental office. At present, the following minors are available: 



Minor 

Agricultural Business Management 

Agricultural and Environmental Technology 

Animal Science 

Applied Sociology 

Biological Sciences 

Biotechnology 

Botany 

Entomology 

Crop Science 

Feed Milling 

Food Science 

Genetics 

Horticultural Science 

Microbiology 

Nutrition 

Poultry Science 

Soil Science 

Zoology 



Department 

Agricultural and Resource Economics 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Animal Science 

Sociology and Anthropology 

Biological Sciences 

Biological Sciences 

Botany 

Entomology 

Crop Science 

Poultry Science 

Food Science 

Genetics 

Horticultural Science 

Microbiology 

Food Science 

Poultry Science 

Soil Science 

Zoology 



Interdepartmental and Interdisciplinary Programs 

These curricula offer the opportunity to select broad curriculum majors that involve two or more departments or colleges: 

Agronomy 

a technical curriculum dealing with the fundamentals of crop production and soil management. The curriculum is administered by the 
Departments of Crop Science and Soil Science. 

Biological Sciences 

a curriculum with emphasis on biological and physical sciences, especially designed for graduate or professional courses requiring a 
biology background. 

Environmental Sciences 

a curriculum concerned with the development of new and more efficient ways to maintain and enhance the world's environments for 
society's benefit including ecological, technical and economic approaches. The curriculum is administered jointly by the College of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences. 

Natural Resources 

a curriculum concentrating on the use, management, and improvement of natural resources. The curriculum is administered jointly by 
the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the College of Natural Resources, and the College of Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences. 

In addition to these cited curricula, a number of arrangements are available that provide the student an opportunity to select areas of 
course concentration. 



64 



College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 



Student Activities 

Students in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences have numerous opportunities to take part in broadening extracurricular 
activities. Most departments have student organizations that provide the professional as well as social experience. Representatives of 
these clubs form the Agri-Life Council. This council is the student organization representing the college. Student tours provide an 
opportunity to see firsthand the application of classroom principles. In addition, students representing agrimarketing, agronomy, 
animal science, horticultural science, food science, poultry science and soil science compete regionally and nationally in a number of 
activities, providing student members a chance to learn by travel as well as by participation. 

Honors Programs 

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences has a comprehensive honors program for qualified students throughout their academic 
careers. Both seminar discussion programs covering broad topics and an independent research program are included. Faculty provide 
direction on an individual basis to each student with the students selecting their projects. 

Participation in the CALS Honors Program is limited to CALS students with a GPA of 3.35 or above. The following ALS courses, 
398H, 498H, 499H, are required. In addition, a student must take at least 6 hours of honors course work (at least 3 credit hours 
outside CALS) or participate in the University Scholars Program for at least two semesters. Honors course work must be completed 
with a "C" or better 

Joint College Honors Program 

The Department of Molecular and Structural Biochemistry's Honors Program, which is administered through the College of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, is designed to encourage excellent 
undergraduate biochemistry majors to develop their academic potential through a selection of courses and research that will challenge 
their abilities and better prepare them for postgraduate careers. 

To be admitted to this program, a student must have at least a 3.5 overall GPA, including grades B or better in calculus (MA I4L 241, 
242), general chemistry (CH 101, 201, 202), organic chemistry (CH 221, 223), and calculus based physics (PY 205, 208). To 
complete the program, the student must take two semesters of physical chemistry (CH 431, 433), and earn at least three credit hours 
in biochemical-related research. A written scientific report based on the student's research is required. A minimum of 9 credit hours 
must be drawn from at least two of the following three categories: 

• designated Honors courses, such as BCH 454H 
advanced courses, such as 500-level courses in related fields 

• research, such as BCH 492, BCH 493, or ALS 498H and 499H 

Honor Societies 

Students in all majors with strong academic records are recognized by national organizations that have local chapters. Gamma Sigma 
Delta, Alpha Zeta, Alpha Epsilon Delta, and Phi Kappa Phi. 

Scholarship Program 

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences awards approximately 350 scholarships each year on a combination of selection factors 
including merit, financial need, and leadership. 

Jefferson Scholars in Agriculture/Life Sciences and the Humanities 

(See College of Humanities and Social Sciences) 

The Thomas Jefferson Scholars Program in Agriculture and Life Sciences and the Humanities is a joint program of the College of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. It is a double degree that permits participants to 
have two concentrations: one in an area of agriculture/life sciences and one in an area of humanities/social sciences. The double 
degree program may be individually designed to meet each student's particular interests and career goals. The purpose of the program 
is to produce potential leaders in agriculture and the life sciences who have not only technical expertise but also an appreciation for 
the social, political, and cultural issues that atTect decision-making. Each spring a number of entering freshmen are chose to receive 
scholarships to participate in the Jefferson Program. In addition, other qualified students may choose to pursue a double major in 
agriculture/life sciences and the humanities under the Jefferson Program. 

Students interested in applying to the Jefferson Scholars program should contact either of the following people before January 15. 

Dr. Kenneth L. Esbenshade, Associate Dean Dr. Randy Thomson, Associate Dean 

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

NCSU Box 7642, Raleigh, NC 27695 NCSU Box 8 1 1 , Raleigh, NC 27695 

phone: (919)515-2614 phone: (919)515-2467 



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College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 




DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION 
EDUCATION 

Ricks Hall, Room 216 
phone: (919)515-2207 
www.cals.ncsu.edu/agexed 

J. L. Flowers, Head and Coordinator of Advising 
G. E. Moore, Coordinator of Graduate Programs 

Professors: G.W. Bostick, G.E. Moore, R.D. Mustian. R.W. Shearon; Assistant Professors: 
D.B. Croom, E.B. Wilson; Extension Specialists-Educational Programs: J.G. Richardson; 
Extension Associates: J. Bledsoe, B. Forrest, D. Harris, H. Johnson, R.M. Stewart; Associate 
F acuity: J. GrotT. D.M. Jenkins, R.C. King, R.T. Liles, T.T. McKinncy. M. Owen; Adjunct 
Faculty: M. Baker, D. Boone, E.J. Boone, J. Lee, D. Peasley, J. Sabella. 

Agricultural and Extension Education is a broad field of study and practice representing the 
blending of agricultural and behavioral sciences into educational programs for youth and adults. Agriculture impacts everyone's life 
in terms of food, water, air, clothing, homes and the quality of life. Central to the department's goals is the formal and non-formal 
teaching of problem-solving and learning skills for a lifetime of growing, evolving, and changing. 

Numerous professional improvement opportunities area available to people participating in departmental programs. Graduates have 
the choice to plan for teaching, administrative leadership and public relations positions in secondary schools, community colleges. 
Cooperative Extension, and universities and agribusinesses. Graduates are highly qualified in agricultural and extension education 
and career placement assistance is provided to all graduates. 

Curricula 

The Agricultural Education curriculum encompasses areas of study that will enable students to participate effectively in planning, 
promoting, and initiating educational programs in agriculture. The program leads to a Bachelor of Science degree and is designed to 
prepare teachers of agriculture for secondary schools and community and technical colleges. The demand for agricultural education 
teachers exceeds present supply in the Carolinas, Virginia, and throughout the nation. 

The Extension Education/Extension Concentration curriculum is designed to prepare individuals for careers in the extension service. 
The program leads to a Bachelor of Science degree in Extension Education. Students are required to complete both classroom and 
laboratory studies on the NC State campus and a closely supervised practicum in the field. A full semester internship in an office or 
agriculture-related industry during the senior year is required. 

The Extension Education/Communication Concentration curriculum is designed to prepare individuals for careers in professions 
related to communications in agriculture. The program leads to a Bachelor of Science degree in Extension Education. Students are 
required to complete both classroom and laboratory studies on the NC State campus and a closely supervised practicum in the field. 
A 45-hour field work experience in an agriculture industry during the sophomore year and a full-semester practicum experience in an 
agricultural-related industry during the senior year are required. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg records/curricula 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS 

Nelson Hall, Room 232 
phone: (919)515-3107 
www.ag-econ. ncsu.edu 

J. A. Brandt. Head 

C. L. Moore, Associate Head and Extension Leader 

A. W. Oltmans, Coordinator of Undergraduate Programs 

D. J. Flath, Graduate Coordinator 

William Neal Reynolds Professor: M.K. Wohlgenant; Professors: J. A. Brandt, A.B. Brown, G.A. Carlson, L.E. Danielson, J.E. 
Easley, E.A. Estes, T.J. Grennes. M.T. Holt, M.C. Marra, C.L. Moore. CD. Safiey, V.K. Smith, W.N. Thurman. T. Vukina. M.L. 
Walden. M.K. Wohlgenant; Adjunct Professor: J.B. Hunt, Jr; Professors Emeriti: R.C. Brooks. A.J. Coutu, D.G. Harwood. Jr.. D.M. 
Hoover. L.A. Ihnen. R.A. King. H.L. Liner. T.E. Nichols. Jr.. D.F. Neuman. E.C. Pasour. Jr.. G.R. Pugh. R.A. Schrimper. J. A. 
Seagraves. R.L. Simmons, W.L. Turner. C.R. Weathers, R.C. Wells, J.C. Williamson, Jr.; Associate Professors: G.A. Benson, PL. 
Fackler, A.W. Oltmans, M.A. Renkow. G.A. Wossink, K.D. Zering; Associate Professors Emeritus: J.G Algood, R.S Boals, H.C. 
Gilliam, Jr., D.D. Robinson, PS. Stone; Assistant Professors: F. Ciliberto, D.G. Hallstrom, A. Inoue, R.L. Lamb, D.J. Phaneuf, N.E. 
Piggott; Assistant Professors Emeriti: J.C. Matthews, Jr., E.M. Stallings; Lecturers: M.L. Hendrickson, J.L. Phillips. J.S. Russ, H.A. 
Sampson, III; Adjunct Instructors: R.K. Campbell. J.H. Kirchk. J.M. Kuszaj. M. Wohlgenant; Extension Specialists: S.G. BuUen. 
T.A. Feitshans, G. van der Hoven, L.S. Smutko. R.H. Usry. 

The Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics serves agricultural, resource and related industries through its extension, 
research and teaching programs. Applying principles of economics, business, and related disciplines, these programs develop an 

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College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 



understanding of contemporary economic and business problems and equip students with a i<^nowledge of business organization 
ftjndamentals and decision-making skills useful in the operation and management of business firms. 

The department offers undergraduate programs leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Business Management. A 
concentration in biological sciences and business management is offered within the agricultural business management program. The 
department also offers concentrations within to campus-wide degree programs: a natural resources economics and management 
concentration leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Natural Resources (see natural resources curriculum) and an economic 
policy concentration leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Sciences (see environmental sciences curriculum). 

The Agricultural Business Management Program prepares graduates for management, marketing, sales, finance and related careers. 
The program has sufficient flexibility to provide more extensive course work in basic and applied science and math for those students 
desiring to prepare for advanced graduate study as well. The concentration in biological sciences/business management prepares 
graduates for management, marketing, and sales careers in fields such as biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, health care, environmental 
protection, food processing and finance dealing with biological issues. This concentration is designed to be an attractive option for 
students with a strong background and interest in science who seek alternatives to technical science careers. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Opportunities 

The growing number of specialized business firms producing and marketing services and products in agriculture, resource and life 
science-related industries has created an increasing demand for graduates trained in agriculture and biological sciences/business 
management, resource economics and management and environmental policy. 

Employment opportunities include careers with companies in purchasing, processing, and marketing food, fiber and related products; 
firms producing and marketing production inputs (feed, equipment, chemicals, drugs, etc.) and services; banks; other financial and 
credit agencies; cooperatives; natural resources management units and consulting fimis; and natural resources and environmental 
educational or regulatory agencies. 

Many graduates pursue careers in research and education with various state and federal government agencies. These agencies include 
the Cooperative Extension Service, the Agricultural Research Service, the State Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, 
Environmental and Natural Resources, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the Environmental Protection Agency. 

Minor in Agricultural Business Management 

The Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics offers a minor in Agricultural Business Management. This minor provides 
students an opportunity to learn basic concepts usefiil in many careers in agricultural business. A total of 15 hours of course work is 
required, including ARE 201, and four additional courses chosen from a list of selected courses in agricultural and resource 
economics and related business fields. Consult the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics for specific information. 

CURRICULA IN AGRONOMY 

Williams Hall 

J. Thomas Stalker, Head of the Department of Crop Science 

D. K. Cassel, Head of the Department of Soil Science, Director of Graduate Programs, Soil Science 

J. Spears, Undergraduate Coordinator, Crop Science 

H. J. Kleiss, Undergraduate Coordinator, Soil Science 

D. Danehower, Director of Graduate Programs, Crop Science 

Agronomy is the development and practical application of plant and soil sciences to produce abundant, high quality food, feed, fiber 
and specialty crops in an environmentally sustainable manner. Agronomists serve a vital role in global agriculture and the 
maintenance of environmental quality. Students may earn a Bachelor of Science degree within the technology curriculum of the 
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences with a major in Agronomy. The agronomy curriculum is administered jointly by the 
Departments of Crop Science and Soil Science. Crop Science relates primarily to the genetics, breeding, physiology and management 
of field crops and turf Soil Science is oriented toward soil physics, chemistry, origin, microbiology, fertility and management. For 
further information and employment opportunities, see the departmental headings for Crop Science and Soil Science. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Curriculum in Agronomy, Agronomic Sciences Concentration 

Curriculum in Agronomy, Agronomic Business Concentration 

Curriculum in Agronomy, Crop Production Concentration 

Curriculum in Agronomy, Soil Science Concentration 

Curriculum in Agronomy, Turfgrass Management Concentration 



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College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 




DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Polk Hall, Room 123 
www.cals.ncsu.edu/an sci/home/home.html 



R. L. McCraw, Head 

J. A. Moore, Undergraduate Coordinator 

E. J. Eisen, Graduate Coordinator 



Wf^^^f Alumni Distinguished Professors: S.L. Ash, W.L. Flowers; William Neal Reynolds Professor: E.J. Eisen; 

if M Alumni Distinguished Professors Serving as Administrators: J.C. Cornwell, K.L. Esbenshade; 

v' f • Professors: B.R Alston-Mills, J. H. Eisemann, R.L. McCraw, R. A. Mowrey, Jr., J. Odie, R.M. Petters, 

O.W. Robison, J.W. Spears, S.P. Washburn, L.W. Whitlow; Professors Serving as Administrators: L.S. 
Bull, R.G. Crickenberger; Adjunct Professor: S.D. Perreault (Environmental Protection Agency); 
Professors Emeriti: A.V. Allen, T.C. Blalock, D.G. Braund, K..R. Butcher, E.B. Caruolo, D.G. Davenport, 
R.W. Harvey, W.L. Johnson, E.E. Jones, J.R. Jones, F.N. Knott, C.A. Lassiter, J.M. Leatherwood, J.G. Lecce, B.T. McDaniel, R.D. 
Mochrie, R.M. Myers. G.S. Parsons, J.W. Patterson, B.R. Poulton, A.H. Rakes, H.A. Ramsey, F.D. Sargent, F.H. Smith, J.C. Wilk, 
G.H. Wise, J.R. Woodard; Associate Professors: C.E. Farin, B.A. Hopkins, R.E. Lichtenwalner, J.M. Luginbuhl, W.E.M. Morrow, 
M.H. Poore, M.T. See, CM. Williams; Associate Professors Emeriti: E.U. Dillard, J.J. McNeil; Assistant Professors: S.L. Ash, J. P. 
Cassady, V. Fellner, R.J. Harrell, M.E. Hockett, G.B. Huntington, J. A. Moore, E. van Heugten, T.A. van Kempen, C.S. Whisnant; 
Lecturer: J.L. Sandberg; Visiting Lecturer: K.D. Ange; E.xtension Specialists: J.S. Clay, PA. Dukas, G.R. Griffm, D.C. Miller, D.E. 
Pritchard, M.J. Yoder; Extension Specialists Emeriti: B.C. Allison, J.H. Gregory, J.W. Parker, R.W. Swain; Associate Members of the 
Faculty: GW. Almond (Farm Animal Health and Resource Management, CVM), G.A. Benson (Agricultural and Resource 
Economics); J.C. Bums (USDA); W.M. Hagler (Plant Pathology, Poultry Science); D.K. Larick (Graduate School); J. Piedrahita 
(Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine), M.D. Whitacre (Farm Animal Health and Resource Management, 
College of Veterinary Medicine). 

Animal Science is a broad field centered on the biology, production, management, and care of domestic animals. Animals have, 
throughout history, provided man with a major source of food, fiber, pleasure, and companionship. Undergraduate students study 
subjects related to various phases of animal science. Courses are offered in anatomy, physiology, nutrition, genetics, and 
management, and there are opportunities for the application of basic scientific training in the husbandry areas. Use of animals and 
animal specimens is critical to our educational program. To obtain full credit for Animal Science courses, students are required to 
participate in laboratory procedures involving animals and animal specimens. All activities with live animals are approved by the 
Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (I ACUC). Many lectures also incorporate animals or animal specimens into the course. 
Options for course selection by each student make it possible for those with varying backgrounds and wide-ranging interests to 
become involved in stimulating and rewarding experiences. 

Opportunities 

Opportunities for animal scientists are boundless and the areas of emphasis are diverse. Animal science graduates are qualified for 
positions in a wide variety of areas such as: research and development at pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies; livestock, 
horse, or companion animal management; animal breeding and production; feed and animal healthcare product sales and service; 
livestock marketing; consulting; state and federal departments of agriculture; breed associations; educational and financial 
institutions; livestock, horse, and companion animal publications and other media; animal technical services; extension services; and 
public relations. Animal scientists can be found across the nation and around the world in all phases of production, research, sales, 
service, business, health, and education. Many students in pre-veterinary medicine obtain degrees in animal science, as do other 
preprofessional students including pre-medical and pre-dental. Students may elect graduates study, after which they will find 
opportunities in teaching, research, and extension. See listing of graduate degrees ofTered in the Graduate Catalog. 

Curricula 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in animal science may be obtained under either the science or industry curricula 
oftered in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The science curriculum (SAS) is designed for students with interest in 
advanced study in disciplines such as physiology, nutrition, and genetics. Many students in pre-veterinary medicine are enrolled in 
this curriculum pursuing a Bachelor of Science Degree in Animal Science. The industry (IAS) curriculum is for students interested in 
entr>' into the animal industry or allied businesses. It offers fiexibility in complementing animal science with business, economics, 
and applied science course work. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: wwvv.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Industry Curriculum in Animal Science 
Science Curriculum in Animal Science 

Minor in Animal Science 

A minor in .-Xnimal Science is open to all interested baccalaureate students. This minor is appropriate for (but not limited to) students 
majoring in Agricultural Business Management, Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Education. Agronomy. Food Science. Poultry 
Science and Zoology. Students completing a minor in Animal Science will become familiar with animal production and with its 
related industries. The minor requires a minimum of 1 5 credit hours with a grade of "C-" or better, including 8 hours in required 
courses and 7 hours in elective courses. The program is fiexible in order that students may emphasize the discipline or species of their 
interest. See: www.ncsu.edu/advising central/minorsdesc/animalsci. html. 



College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 



DEPARTMENT OF MOLECULAR AND STRUCTURAL BIOCHEMISTRY 

Polk Hall, Room 128 
phone: (919)515-2581 

D. T. Brown, Head 

E. S. Maxwell, Assistant Department head and Director of Undergraduate Programs 
J. A. Knopp, Undergraduate Coordinator 

William Neal Reynolds Professor: W.L. Miller; Professors: RF. Agris, L.K. Hanley-Bowdoin, E.S. Maxwell, B.C. Sisler, RL. 
Wollenzien; Adjunct Professors: K.S. Korach, M. Luther, J.D. Otvos, E.C. Theil; Professors Emeriti: RB. Armstrong, H.R. Horton, 
J.S. Kahn, I.S. Longmuir; Associate Professors: C.C. Hardin, C.L. Hemenway, J.A. Knopp; Assistant Professors: A.C. Clark, M.B. 
Goshe, C. Mattos, R.B. Rose; Visiting Assistant Professors: D.G. Presutti; Research Assistant Professor: H.S. Gracz; Associate 
Members of the Faculty: S. Franzen (Chemistry), H.M. Hassan (Microbiology), J. Horowitz (Veterinary Medicine), J.W. Moyer 
(Plant Pathology), D.E. Sayers (Physics), R.R. Sederoff (Forestry, Genetics); Lecturer: A. Sylvia. 

Biochemistry is the science which is concerned with the discovery and understanding of the chemical principles of life. It is a wide- 
ranging field from the composition, biosynthesis, structure and function of biomolecules to the control and regulation of biochemical 
processes within organelles, cells, organs and organisms. Biochemical principles form the basis of most laboratory procedures within 
the life cycle. 

Opportunities 

The Biochemistry program provides B.S. graduates with the scientific background and skills required for employment in 
biochemistry, molecular biology, biotechnology, and genetics and for the health fields of medicine, veterinary science pharmacology, 
and related fields. 

Awards 

The H. Robert Horton Award is given to the outstanding student in Biochemistry based on scholarly and research achievements as 
selected by the Biochemistry graduate students. 

Honors 

The honors program in Biochemistry is jointly administered within the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of 
Physical and Mathematical Sciences. It is designed for students who wish to explore advanced courses and be rewarded for 
outstanding academic achievement. 

To be admitted to the honors program, a student must complete the three semester sequence of Calculus (MA 141, 241, 242) and the 
calculus based Physics sequence (PY 205 and 208). Exceptions can be made for transfer students. Students with a GPA of at least 3.5 
are invited into the program in their junior year. To complete the program, a student must take the two semester Physical Chemistry 
sequence (CH 431 and 433), at least three hours of research and six hours of advanced or honors courses at the 300- or400-level. 
Interested students should contact the Undergraduate Coordinator of Biochemistry for more detailed information. 

Curricula 

The curriculum emphasizes the fundamentals of biological and physical sciences, offering students both breadth of knowledge and 
depth of understanding. It is designed to provide students with broad experience in biological and chemical sciences and to encourage 
the development of experimental skills. One important aspect is the requirement of at least one semester experience in a Biochemistry 
laboratory. Because of the breadth of the course requirements, many students can easily add a second major in Biological Sciences, 
Chemistry, or other science as well as add a minor in Genetics. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg records/curricula 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

David S. Weaver Laboratories, Room 100 
phone: (919)515-2694 
www.bae.ncsu.edu 

J. H. Young, Head 

R. O. Evans, Jr., Department of Extension Leader 
D. H. Willis, Director of Graduate Programs 
S. A. Hale., Undergraduate Coordinator 

Distinguished University Professor and William Neal Reynolds Professor: R.W. Skaggs; Professors: C.G. Abrams, Jr., D.B. Beasley, 
S.M. Blanchard, C.J. Bowers, Jr., M.D. Boyette, F.J. Humenik, G.D. Jennings, T.M. Losordo, J.E. Parsens, R.P Rohorbach, A.R. 
Rubin, R.S. Sowell, L.R Stikeleather, RW. Westerman, T.B. Whitaker (USDA), D.H. Willis, J.H. Young; Adjunct Professors: L.M. 
Safely, Jr., S.S. Schiffman, L.R Sykes; Professors Emeriti: J.C. Barker, GB. Blum, Jr., J.W. Dickens, L.B. Driggers, J.M. Fore, G.W. 
Giles, E.G. Humphries, W.H. Johnson, GJ. Kriz, W.R McClure, RM. Richardson, R.E. Sneed, C.W. Suggs, R.W. Watkins, E.H. 
Wiser; Associate Professors: G.R. Baughman, J.J. Classen, R.O. Evans, Jr., S.A. Hale, R.L. Huffman, G.T. Roberson; Research 

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College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 



Associate Professors: S.K. Lehir; Extension Associate Professors; J. Spooner; Assistant Professors: J. Cheng, M.S. Cliinn, P.L. 
Mente, R.R. Sharma; Research Assistant Professors: G.M. Chescheir; Assistant Professor: G.L. Grabow; Adjunct Assistant 
Professors: D.D. Archibald, R.L. Langley, S.K. Seymour; Extension Specialists: W.F. Hunt, D.E. Line, J.M. Rice, R.L. Sherman; 
Associate Members of the Faculty: C.R. Daubert (Food Science), B.E. Farkas (Food Science), A.E. Hassan (Forestry), K.M. Keener 
(Food Science), S.C. Roe (Companion Animal & Special Species Medicine), K.P. Sandeep (Food Science), K.R. Swartzel (Food 
Science). 

The Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering offers two four-year undergraduate programs in Biological Engineering 
(BE) and in Agricultural and Environment Technology (AET). The BE curriculum includes concentrations in agricultural 
engineering, bioprocess engineering, and environmental engineering. All concentrations within the BE curriculum emphasize basic 
science and engineering courses that provide a sound background for application of engineering principles to biological and 
agricultural problems. The AET combines an understanding of the agricultural, biological, and physical sciences with technology and 
economics so that the focus is on applying engineering principles to agricultural and environmental systems. 

Opportunities 

BE students learn to solve a wide variety of engineering problems and will have opportunities for specialization. Scientific and 
engineering principles are applied: to analyze, understand and utilize mechanical properties of biological materials; to the 
conservation and management of soil and water resources; to the design of sensor-based instmmentation and control systems for 
biological and agricultural applications; to the design and development of machinery systems for all phases of agricultural and food 
production; to the design of structures and environmental control systems for housing animals, plant growth, and biological product 
storage; to the design and evaluation of ergonomic devices for human and animal applications; and to the development of improved 
systems for processing and marketing food and agricultural products. 

Graduates of the BE curriculum receive a "BS in Biological Engineering," qualifying them for positions in design, development, and 
research in both industry and public institutions. The curriculum also prepares students for post-graduate work leading to advanced 
degrees. Some positions filled by recent BE graduates include: product design; development and testing; plant engineering and 
management; engineering analysis and inspection for federal and state agencies; engineering analysis and inspection for federal and 
state agencies; engineering consultant and research. Entry-level salary ranges for BE graduates are similar to those of Civil, 
Industrial, and Mechanical Engineering graduates. 

The AET curriculum provides graduate opportunities in technical analysis, application and evaluation of agricultural production 
systems and environmental systems. The curriculum's flexibility enables students to specialize technologically in agriculture, the 
environment, or business management. Careers include technical jobs in production agriculture, environmental systems, agribusiness 
sales and service, and agricultural extension. 

Curricula 

The BE curriculum is jointly administered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Engineering and 
combines the fields of engineering, biology and agriculture. The BE curriculum is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation 
Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 1 1 1 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21201-4012; 
phone: (410)347-7700. BE graduates are qualified to become registered professional engineers by passing the appropriate 
examinations and upon completing the engineering experience requirements. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

The program educational objectives of the Biological Engineering (BE) Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree are to: 

Educate students for successful careers in engineering by mastering the fundamentals of engineering and biology. 

Instill in the students time management skills and a sense of confidence in their ability to grasp and apply engineering principles 

to solve complex, real-world problems. 

• Impart a sense of professional responsibility and work ethic. 

• Establish an educational environment in which students participate in interdisciplinary activities. 

Offer a curriculum that provides students an opportunity to become broadly educated engineers and life-long learners. 

Expose students to advances in engineering practice and research. 

Recruit students with high potential who will contribute to the future economic and social well-being of North Carolina. 

The AET curriculum is administered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and is intended to uniquely prepare students for 
hands-on application of technology to efficiently manage agricultural and environmental systems. Flexibility within the program 
allows students to attain depth in science, business, or environmental areas. Graduates provide a critical link in the agricultural and 
environmental spectrum by interacting directly with both the production personnel as well as the designers and implementers of 
technological systems. 

The program objectives of the Agricultural and Environmental Technology (AET) Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree are to: 

Develop in students a contextual knowledge of physical and biological systems supporting agriculture and the environment. 
Develop a contextual knowledge of physical and biological systems supporting agriculture and the environment. 

• Develop depth and/or breadth by choosing appropriate agricultural, environmental or business electives. 

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College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 




Utilize hands-on approaciies in the formulation of solutions to practical problems. 

Apply critical thinking and existing technology to identify, evaluate, and solve problems with agricultural and environmental 
systems. 

Communicate effectively between engineers, technicians, businesses, and consumers to gain information needed to solve and 
problem present solutions. 
Motivate students to engage in life-long learning. 
• Work effectively in teams. 

Minor in Agricultural and Environmental Technology 

A minor is offered to students interested in the applicant of engineering technology analysis in agricultural and environmental 
systems that utilize machinery, agricultural structures, food and feed processing, soil, water and waste management, electrical power 
and controls, and agricultural safety and health technology. This minor is not open to AET majors and allows majors in other 
programs to understand engineering technology for equipment, materials, resources, processes, and facilities utilized in their major 
area of study, and be knowledgeable in the application of technology for managing environmental issues, impacts, and monitoring. 

CURRICULUM IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Bostian Hall, Room 2717 

W. C. Grant, Undergraduate Coordinator 

Professors: W.C. Grant (Zoology), R.P. Patterson (Crop Science), E. Davis (Botany); 
Associate Professors: R.L. Beckmann, Jr. (Botany), M. Niedzlek-Feaver (Zoology), B.C. 
Waning (Plant Pathology), J.E. Mickle (Botany); Faculty Lecturer: L.D. Parks 
(Zoology); Laboratory Supervisor: P.M. Aune (Botany); Laboratory Manager: T.B. 
Johansson (Biological Sciences); Teaching Technician: W.P. Grumpier (Microbiology). 

The Biological Sciences constitute a rapidly developing field offering many challenging 
and rewarding opportunities for well-trained students. The Biological Sciences Interdepartmental Program offers a B.S. Degree in 
Biological Sciences for students seeking comprehensive training in biology and the supporting sciences. Many graduates of this 
program continue further studies in graduate schools in such diverse fields as botany, zoology, marine biology, physiology, genetics, 
biochemistry, biotechnology, pharmacology, and microbiology. Others attend professional schools in medicine, optometry, and 
veterinary medicine as well as other health-related fields. 

The Biological Sciences curriculum provides a modem, flexible, undergraduate program to prepare students for rewarding careers in 
research and teaching as well as in business, industry, research institutes, and governmental agencies. A wide range of career 
opportunities are available in technical sales, manufacturing and quality control, environmental management, and other positions 
with pharmaceutical companies, food manufacturers, medical laboratories, public utilities, and other industries. A joint program with 
the Department of Mathematics and Science Education leads to a double major and a teaching certificate. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Minor in Biological Sciences 

The minor in Biological Sciences is open to all interested baccalaureate students with the exception of Zoology and Botany majors, 
but is intended primarily to enhance the programs of students whose major field is outside the Biological Sciences area. Students 
pursuing a minor in Biological Sciences will become familiar with fundamental principles of biology and gain a broad-based 
perspective of the biological sciences. The minor requires a minimum of 17 credit hours. The minor program is flexible so that 
students may take courses in areas of individual interest. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY 

Gardner Hall, Room 2214 
phone; (919)515-2727 

M. E. Daub, Head 

C. G. VanDyke, Undergraduate Coordinator 

N. S. Allen, Director of Graduate Programs 

University Research Professor: W.F. Thompson; Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: R.L. Beckmann, C.G VanDyke; 
Professors: N.S. Allen, U. Blum, W.F. Boss, R.S. Boston, J.M. Burkholder, W.S. Chilton, E. Davies, R.C. Fites, H.E. Pattee (USDA), 
J.F. Thomas, C.G. VanDyke, T.R. Wentworth; Professors Emeriti: C.E. Anderson, R.J. Downs, J.W. Hardin, W.W. Heck (USDA), 
R.L. Mott, G.R. Noggle, E.D. Seneca, J.R. Troyer; Associate Professors: R.L. Beckmann, J.E. Mickle, D. Robertson, J.M. Stucky; 
Assistant Professor: D. Robertson, J. Xiang; Teaching Technician: D.S. Wright; Associate Members of the Faculty: H.V Amerson 
(Forestry), K.O. Burkey (USDA), M.M. Goodman (Crop Science, Statistics, Genetics), S.C. Huber(USDA), M.D. Purugganan 
(Genetics), T.W. Rufty, Jr., (Crop Science), E.C. Sisler (Biochemistry), E.A. Wheeler (Wood and Paper Science), R.W. Whetten 
(Forestry); Adjunct Associate Professor: C.S. Brown, GK. Muday. 

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The instructional program provides classroom, laboratory, and field experience in the major areas of plant science. Undergraduates 
majoring in botany are given a broad backgroimd in the humanities and physical sciences and are encouraged to participate in 
independent study in the senior year. Majors, as preprofessionals in the plant sciences, are prepared for advanced study in botany and 
other biological fields, as well as in the applied plant sciences, such as horticulture, crop science, plant pathology, resource 
management and environmental biology. 

Opportunities 

The undergraduate degree is an excellent preprofessional degree in the plant sciences. Many majors continue with graduate studies; 
see list of graduate degrees. After obtaining a graduate degree, the undergraduate major will be qualified for teaching positions in the 
community and junior colleges, colleges and universities, for research positions in federal and state government laboratories and in 
private industry. Research technician positions in many life science areas in governmental and industrial laboratories are also career 
possibilities. The field of biotechnology provides additional technical opportunities. Field botanists and naturalists find employment 
in state and national park systems and nature interpretation programs. 

Curricula 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Botany is offered under the science curriculum of the College of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences. The Bachelor of Science with double concentration- one in economics, English, history, philosophy, or political science, 
and the other in botany- is available in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. For details, refer to the appropriate section 
under the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Minor in Biotechnology 

The Minor in Biotechnology is designed to provide a first hand experience with a variety of technologies that use gene manipulation. 
The laboratory courses should be started in the sophomore or junior year, following completion of BIO 181 orZO 160 and Organic 
Chemistry (CH 223) with a grade of C- or better. The Core Technologies course, BIT 360, is required for all students, but MB 409, 
ZO 480, or BCH 454 can be substituted. Other requirements for the minor include a 3 credit research internship, 4 credits of 
advanced biotechnology laboratory courses (BIT 461-468), and a 3 credit ethics course. Interested students should contact Dr. John 
Chisnell in the Biotechnology Program Office, 216 Scott Hall, bio-tech@ncsu.edu, for information and application materials. 

DEPARTMENT OF CROP SCIENCE 

Williams Hall, Room 2205 
phone: (919)515-2647 

H. T. Stalker, Head 

J. F. Spears, Undergraduate Coordinator 

D. A. Danehower, Director of Graduate Programs 

Distinguished University Professor: M.M. Goodman; Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: R.P Patterson; William Neal 
Reynolds Professors: M.M. Goodman, E.A. Wemsman; Philip Morris Professor: GF. Peedin; Professors: J.R. Anderson, D.T. 
Bowman, A.H. Bnmeau, J.C. Bums (USDA). J.W. Burton (USDA), B.E. Caldwell, T.E. Carter, Jr. (USDA), F.T. Corbin, E.J. 
Dunphy, E.L. Fiscus (USDA), D.S. Fisher (USDA), J.T. Green, Jr., S.C. Huber (USDA), R.E. Jarrett, D.A. Kjiauft, H.M. Linker, R.C. 
Long, J.E. Miller (USDA), J.R Mueller. J.R Murphy. CH. Peacock, R.C. Ruf\y, W.D. Smith, H.T. Stalker, J.B. Weber, W.W. Weeks, 
R. Wells, G.G. Wilkerson. R.F. Wilson (USDA), J.C. Wynne, A.C. York; Adjunct Professors: J.R. Evans. K.D. Getsinger. D.G. 
Oblinger, D.T. Patterson, J.A. Ryals, GM. Werner; Professors Emeriti: R.R. Bennett, C.T. Blake, C.A. Brim, D.S. Chamblee, J.F. 
Chaplin, H.D. Coble, W.K. Collins, W.A. Cope, S.H. Dobson, D.A. Emery, W.T. Fike, D.U. Gerstel, W.B. Gilbert. W.C. Gregory, 
H.D. Gross, G.R. Gwynn. PH. Harvey, S.N. Hawks, G.L. Jones, GC. Klingman, J.A. Lee, W.H. Lewis, R.L. Lovvom, R.P Moore, 
D.E. Moreland, A. Perry, L.L. Phillips, J.C. Rice, H. Seltman, GA. Sullivan, D.L. Thompson, D.H. Timothy. J.A. Weybrew, A.D. 
Worsham; Associate Professors: D.C. Bowman, K.O. Burkey (USDA), R.J. Cooper, D.A. Danehower. R.E. Dewey, K.L. Edmisten, 
G.P Fenner, T.G Isleib, S.H. Kay, R.D. Keys, P Kwanyuen (USDA), D.P Livingston (USDA). PH. Sisco (USDA), V.A. Sisson, J.F. 
Spears, A.K. Weissinger, R. Wells, J. Wilcot; Associate Professors Emeriti: R.L. Davis, W.G Toomey; Assistant Professors: R.W. 
Heiniger, D. Jordan, J^M. Luginbuhl, R. Qu, P.R. Weisz, F.H. Yelverton; Adjunct Assistant Professor; M. Fraser; E.xtension 
Specialists: D.W. Daniel, CM. Sasser; Crop Science Specialists: S.C. Bennett, CE. Collins, G.E. Martin; Associate Members of the 
Faculty: R.L. Beckmann (Biological Sciences), M. Feaver (Zoology), W. Grant (Zoology), B. Haing (Biological Sciences), J. Mickle 
(Biological Sciences), L. Parks (Lecturer), CW. Stuber (Genetics). W.F. Thomson, C.T. Young (Food Science); Visiting Professor: 
T.W. Rufty, Jr. 

Crop Scientists seek to improve the productivity, profitability, and quality of our major food, feed, fiber, and specialty crops; enhance 
the quality of turf and vegetative cover, enhance our environment, and improve the nutrition and economic health of our world. The 
Crop Science four-year undergraduate program is offered within the Agronomy curriculum and is administered jointly by the Crop 
Science and Soil Science Departments. Students may earn a Bachelor of Science degree in the technology curriculum with a major in 
Agronomy (See Agronomy Curriculum). 



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Opportunities 

Agronomy major graduates find employment as consultants, extension agents, farm managers, golf course superintendents, 
landscape specialists, research scientists, seed production specialists, sod production specialists, soil survey specialists, soil 
conservationists, technical sales representatives, and waste management specialists. Graduate work can lead to careers in plant 
breeding, biotechnology, crop physiology and chemistry, and crop management systems. (For Crop Science graduate programs, see 
the Graduate Catalog). 



Curricula 

Students may earn a Bachelor of Science degree in the technology curriculum with a major in Agronomy. The Agronomy option is 
administered jointly by the Departments of Crop Science and Soil Science. 

Minor in Crop Science 

Open to any undergraduate degree student interested in gaining knowledge of the development, productivity and sustainability of 
crop management systems, genetic improvement and pest management strategies, and the interaction of crops with their physical and 
biotic environment. It is intended to complement other curricula that are related to crop-environment and agro-ecological studies. An 
appreciation of agronomic approaches which lead to a more efficient use of crop production inputs and to a less invasive impact on 
the environment is emphasized. It is not intended to prepare students for a professional career in Crop Science. Additional courses are 
recommended for students who plan graduate work in this discipline 

CURRICULUM IN DAIRY SCIENCE 

(See Animal Science) 

DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY 

Gardner Hall, Room 2301 
phone: (919)515-2746 

J. D. Harper, Head 

J. R. Meyer, Undergraduate Coordinator 
D. B. Orr, Director of Graduate Programs 
P. S. Southern, Department Extension Leader 

Phillip Morris Professor: P.S. Souther, J.W. Van Duyn; William Neal Reynolds 
Professor: F.L. Gould, G.G Kennedy, R.M. Roe; Blanton J. Whitmire Professor: C. 
Schal; Charles G. Wright Professor: J. Silverman; Professors: J.T. Ambrose, C.S. 
Apperson, J.S. Bacheler, J.R. Bradley, Jr., R.L. Brandenberg, L.L. Deitz, F.R Hain, 

J.D. Harper, J.R. Meyer, B.M. Parker, K.A. Sorensen, R.E. Stinner, J.F. Walgenbach; 

Adjunct Professors: G Gordh, D.M. Jackson, P.M. Marsh, D.E. Sonenshine; 

Professors Emeriti: R.C. Axtell, M.E. Barbercheck, J.R. Baker, W.M. Brooks, W.V. 

Campbell, M.H. Farrier, R.J. Kuhr, H.B. Moore, Jr., H.H. Neunzig, R.L. Rabb, R.L. 

Robertson, C.G. Wright; Associate Professors: D.B. Orr, C.E. Sorenson, B.M. 

Wiegmann; Adjunct Assistant Professors: D.E. Herbert, C. Nalepa; Associate 

Professor Emeritus: R.C. Hillman; Assistant Professors: C.A. Casey, E.L. Vargo, D.W. 

Watson; Adjunct Associate Professors: A.K. Dowdy, K.R. Lakin, R. Sequiera, J.W. 

Smith, M.D. Tomalski; Visiting Assistant Professor: M.G. Waldvogel; Extension 

Specialists: S.B. Bambara, D.L. Stephan, S.M. Stringham, S.J. Toth, M.G. Waldvogel; 
Associate Members of the Department: Professors: R.B. Leidy (Toxicology), H.M. Linker (Crop Science); Assistant Professors: W.G. 
Buhler (Horticulture), D.J. Robison (Forestry), R. Rose (Toxicology). 

Undergraduate instruction in entomology provides introductory and advanced courses in the basic science of entomology and the 
management of beneficial and pest insects. Courses at the 200- and 400-level courses fulfill General Education Requirements in 
Natural Sciences or Science and Technology and serve students majoring in biological sciences, agronomy, botany, horticultural 
science, agricultural education, crop science, and forestry. They also provide fundamental training for graduate study in entomology 
(see the Graduate Catalog). 

Opportunities 

For graduates with advanced degrees in entomology, opportunities include research, teaching, and extension positions in colleges and 
universities; research, development, production, control, and sales positions in private industries; consultative positions in pest 
management; curatorial positions in museums; and research and regulatory positions with state and federal agencies. 




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Curricula 

There is no entomology undergraduate major. Those students with a primary interest in entomology are advised to choose a general 
biological sciences curricula and the minor in entomology. 

Minor in Entomology 

The Department of Entomology offers an undergraduate minor available to all baccalaureate degree students at North Carolina State 
University. The minor is especially appropriate for (but not limited to) students interested in biological or agricultural sciences, 
veterinary medicine, or other health sciences. A basic knowledge of insect biology may also be useful to students seeking careers in 
government, industry, or education. The minor consists of a minimum of 1 5 credit hours, including one core course (ENT 402 or 
ENT 425). The remaining hours can be selected from a group of restricted electives. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND MOLECULAR TOXICOLOGY 

Toxicology Building, Centennial Campus 
phone: (919)515-2274 
vvww.tox.ncsu.edu 

D. Shea, Head and Director of Graduate Programs 
C. S. Hofelt, Undergraduate Program Coordinator 

William Neal Reynolds Professor (emeritus): E. Hodgson; Professors: G.A. LeBlanc, R.C. Smart; Adjunct Professors: J. A. Bond, 
A.M. Cummings, A.B. DeAngelo, J. A. Goldstein, L.E. Gray, W.F. Greenlee, K.S. Korach, R.J. Langenbach, R.O. McClellan, R.J. 
Preston, D.C. Zeldin; Professors Emeriti: T.J. Sheets, R.B. Leidy; Associate Professors: S. Branch, D. Shea; Adjunct Associate 
Professors: A.E. Chalmers. N. Chemoff, K.M. Crofton, H.B. Matthews, Jr., B.A. Merrick, R.T. Miller, L. Recio; Assistant Professors: 
W.G. Cope, M.F. Oleksiak, J. Tsuji, Y. Tsuji, A.D. Wallace; Visiting Assistant Professors: C.S. Hofelt, R.L. Rose; Adjunct Assistant 
Professor: D.J. Di.\; Associate Members of the Program: Professors: College of Agriculture and Life Sciences K.B. Adier, J.E. 
Riviere, R.M. Roe, J.M. Cullen, H.M. Hassan, R.J. Kuhr, W.H. McKenzie, N.A. Monteiro-Riviere, M.A. Qureshi, PL. Sannes, LW. 
Smoak, M.K. Stoskopf; Associate Professor: J.M. Law; Research Assistant Professor: J.M. Horowitz; Assistant Professors: R.E. 
Baynes, M. Hyman. 

Toxicology is the science dealing with how chemicals and physical agents cause adverse effects on living organisms and 
environmental systems. This includes understanding where chemicals come from, what happens to them in the environment, how 
people and ecosystems are exposed to chemicals, and the cascade of events that take place following chemical exposure to cause 
adverse effects. Toxicology is an interdisciplinary field of study that integrates many physical, chemical, and biological principles 
that help us better protect human and ecological health. 

Opportunities 

Students who participate in our undergraduate program will gain the scientific background and skills required for employment in 
environmental and biomedical careers with university, industrial, state, and federal research laboratories and regulatory agencies. The 
curriculum is especially suited to students preparing for graduate study in environmental sciences, biochemistry, molecular biology, 
biotechnology, and genetics and for the health fields of medicine, veterinary science, pharmacology and related fields. 

Curricula 

The Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology offers an undergraduate minor in Environmental Toxicology that is 
available to all baccalaureate degree students at North Carolina State University. The minor is intended to provide undergraduate 
students with an understanding of how chemicals and physical agents can adversely affect biological systems and the environment, 
including the mechanisms of chemically induced toxicity, the fate and effects of chemicals in the environment, and the evaluation of 
chemical hazards and risks. The minor is especially appropriate for (but not limited to) students majoring in the biological or 
agricultural sciences, physical sciences or science education. For additional information on course, curriculum, and research 
opportunities please visit our web site at www.tox.ncsu.edu or contact Undergraduate Coordinator Dr. Chris Hofelt at 
c_hofeltrancsu.edu. 

CURRICULA IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 

(Also see Interdisciplinary Programs or Physical and Mathematical Sciences) 

Nelson Hall. Room 2332; Williams Hall. Room 232 1 ; North Gardner Hall. Room 3216 

A. W. Oltmans, Coordinator, Economic Policy Concentration (Nelson Hall, Room 233E) 

H. J. Kleiss, Coordinator, Environmental Soil Science Concentration (Williams Hall, Room 2321) 

S. C. Mozley, Coordinator, Ecology Concentration (Gardner Hall, Room 2104) 

Environmental sciences, in the broadest sense, are concerned with the development of basic knowledge about the world's 
environments and the use of this knowledge to create new and more efficient ways to maintain or enhance the environment for 
society's benefit. Given the complexity of environmental processes and the many ways in which humans interact with natural 
environments, a multidisciplinary systems approach is essential for understanding changes in natural environments. Society's future 
prospects maintaining and improving our environment depends on advances in economics, other social science and humanities and 
the use of these advances to develop and maintain effective economic, political, and social structures. 

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Public concern about environmental issues and the resource costs for protecting our environment is increasing. Protecting and 
improving our environment involves knowledge and systematic problem-solving skills will be essential for environmental scientists. 
Ecologists and other environmental scientists must be conversant with economics, other social sciences, and humanities, while 
environmental economists and political scientists must be competent in the use of mathematical models and statistics. North Carolina 
State University's environmental science degree program provides sound training in each of these areas. Successfiil completion of 
this diverse and challenging program requires a sound academic background and hard work. 

To accommodate the complexity and breadth of environmental sciences, the Bachelor of Science degree in environmental science is 
a campus-wide program involving two colleges and five departments that administer six concentrations. A common core of 89 hours 
provides a balanced foundation in communication, humanities, social sciences, mathematics, and the natural sciences. The core 
requirements include a freshman introductory environmental science course and a capstone course for seniors in which teams of 
students from the various concentrations work together on environmental problems from ecological, physical and economic 
perspectives. Three departments within the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences offer an environmental sciences concentration 
that allows students to specialize in areas within environmental science: Ecology, Economics Policy and Environmental Soil Science 
(see Department of Entomology). For information on other concentrations, see the Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric 
Sciences and the Department of Statistics within the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Curriculum in Environmental Sciences, Ecology Concentration 
Curriculum in Environmental Sciences, Economic Policy Concentration 
Curriculum in Environmental Sciences, Soil Science Concentration 

PROGRAM IN FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE SCIENCES 

Turner House, 1 10 Brooks Avenue 

R. A. Lancia, Undergraduate Coordinator 

The Departments of Forestry and Zoology share the program in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences. Undergraduate education 
emphasizes ecological principles and their application to research problems and natural resource management needs. Majors are well 
prepared for graduate work and entry-level professional positions. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Curriculum in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Concentration in Fisheries Science 

DEPARTMENT OF FOOD SCIENCE 

Schaub Hall, Room 100 
phone: (919)515-2951 

K. R. Swartzel, Head 

D. R. Ward, Associate Department Head and Department Extension Leader 

L. G. Turner, Undergraduate Teaching Coordinator 

D. K. Larick, Graduate Administrator 

Distinguished University Professor: T.R. Klaenhammer; William Neal Reynolds Professors: E.A. Foegeding, K.R. Swartzel; 
Professors: J.C. Allen, L.C. Boyd, D.E. Carroll, Jr., G.L. Catignani, Jr., A.R Hansen, T.C. Lanier, D.K. Larick, R.F. McFeeters 
(USDA), J.L. Oblinger, J.E. Rushing, T.H. Sanders (USDA), L.G. Turner, D.R. Ward; Associate Professors: C.R. Daubert, B.E. 
Farkas, D.P. Green, L.A. Jaykus, S. Kathariou, K.M. Keener; Assistant Professors: F. Breidt (USDA), M.A. Drake, D.J. Hanson, K.P. 
Sandeep; Research Assistant Professor: J. Simunovic; Professors Emeriti: L.W. Aurand, H.R. Ball, T.A. Bell, R.E. Carawan, J. A. 
Christian, E.S. Cofer, H.B. Craig, H.R Fleming, M.E. Gregory, M.W. Hoover, I.D. Jones, V.A. Jones, N.C. Miller Jr., D.H. 
Pilkington, A.E. Purcell, W.M. Roberts, S.J. Schwartz, H.E. Swaisgood, F.B. Thomas, W.M. Walter, Jr.; Associate Members of the 
Faculty: K.E. Anderson (Poultry Science), A.M. Eraser (Family and Consumer Science), S.A. Hale (Biological and Agricultural 
Engineering), H.M. Hassan (Biochemistry, Microbiology, Toxicology). T.J. Hoban (Sociology and Anthropology), S.A. Khan 
(Chemical Engineering), C.J. Lackey (Family and Consumer Sciences), H.E. Pattee (Botany), B.W. Sheldon (Poultry Science); 
Adjunct Professors: RA. Curtis, J.M. Drozd, R.C. Theuer, N.B. Webb. 

The Department of Food Science provides undergraduate and graduate programs for the application and integration of chemistry, 
biology, and engineering to the development, processing, packaging, quality control, distribution, and utilization of safe and 
nutritious foods. The Food Science Bachelor of Science program is compatible with preprofessional school curricula; many students 
elect to double major in Food Science with Biochemistry, Chemical Engineering, Poultry Science or other curricula. Minors in a 
variety of areas are also encouraged. The department maintains modem, fully-equipped laboratories for teaching and research in the 
disciplines of food microbiology, food chemistry /biochemistry, food engineering, and nutrition; and the product areas of dairy, fruit, 
meats, poultry, seafood, and vegetable products. Departmental programs address food safety, value-added food processing, 
environmental impact of food processing, and nutritional health. Food Science includes the most current information related to 
biotechnology, engineering approaches, and computer applications as they relate to providing safe foods with minimal impact on the 
environment. 



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College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 



Opportunities 

Increasing consumer concern regarding food safety and demands for greater varieties of nutritious and convenient foods of uniformly 
high quaHty creates many varied career opportunities in the food, pharmaceutical and allied industries. Career opportunities in food 
industries include management, research and development, process supervision, quality control, procurement, distribution, and sales 
merchandising. Positions include sales and service in allied industries, consulting and trade association activities, and promotional 
and educational services. Food Science graduates hold teaching, research and extension positions with colleges and universities. 
Governmental agencies employ food scientists whose work is directed toward research, regulatory control, and the development of 
food standards. 

The food industry provides both merit and financial need scholarships to encourage students preparing for careers in Food Science. 
Phi Tau Sigma invites outstanding seniors to membership, and all students arc encouraged to participate in the Food Science Club, a 
student branch of the Institute of Food Technologists. 

Curricula 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Food Science is offered through curricula with a science emphasis or a technology 
emphasis. The science program is designed for students with interest in graduate school or for those desiring more rigorous science 
courses for technical careers in the food industry. Students more interested in business opportunities for technically trained 
individuals find that the technology program permits greater fiexibility in complementing Food Science coursework with business, 
agricultural commodity and computer science courses. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Science Curriculum in Food Science 
Technology Curriculum in Food Science 

Minor in Food Science 

The Food Science Minor is designed to provide students with important food science principles and concepts. It should give a 
competitive edge to individuals seeking employment in the food, pharmaceutical and related industries as a chemist, microbiologist, 
engineer, nutritionist, business specialist or technical writer. A minor will provide technical information to improve the studenfs 
knowledge and understanding of food and its manufacture. While a comprehensive coverage of Food Science cannot be 
accomplished in 15 credit hours, flexibility in developing the minor permits tailoring each program to complement a student's major. 
An introductory course (FS 201) is required, but other courses at the 200, 300, and 400 level may be selected to build on the basic 
discipline courses in the student's major. 

DEPARTMENT OF GENETICS 

Gardner Hall, Room 3513 
phone: (919)515-2292 
www.cals.ncsu.edu/genetics/ 

S. E. Curtis, Head and Director of Graduate Programs 

W. H. McKenzie, Undergraduate Teaching Coordinator and Undergraduate Minor Administrator 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: T.H. Emigh, W.H. McKenzie; William Neal Reynolds Professors: W.R. Atchley, 
T.F.C. Mackay; Professors: S.E. Curtis, W.E. Kloos, S.L. Spiker, S.B. Zeng; Adjunct Professor: M.D. Chilton; Professors Emeriti: 
W.D. Hanson, C.S. Levings, T.J. Mann, D.F. Matzinger, J.G. Scandalios, R.H. Moll. C.W. Stuber, A.C. Triantaphyllou; Associate 
Professors: G.C. Gibson, J.W. MahatTey, M. Purugganan, J.L. Thome; Adjunct Associate Professor: M.A. Conkling; Assistant 
Professors: J. Alonso, P. Estes, L. Mathies; Assistant Adjunct Professors: R Hurban, S.J. Uknes; Associate Members of the Faculty: 
R.R.H. Anholt, L. Hanley-Bowdoin (Molecular and Structural Biochemistry), R.S. Boston (Botany), R.A. Dean (Plant Pathology). 
M.M. Goodman (Crop Science), F. Gould (Entomology), T.R. Klaenhammer, S.A. Lommel (Plant Pathology), R.R. SederotT 
(Forestry), C.H. Opperman (Plant Pathology), D. Robertson (Botany), W.F. Thompson (Botany), B.S. Weir (Statistics). 

The Department of Genetics offers courses at the advanced undergraduate and graduate levels. Undergraduate students interested in 
genetics are encouraged to pursue a genetics minor (see below) in conjunction with a major in one the basic biological or agricultural 
sciences. An undergraduate major in genetics is not available. The graduate program is designed to train scientists for research and 
teaching careers in genetics and molecular biology. Please refer to the Graduate Catalog for further infomiation concerning the M.S. 
and Ph.D. degrees in genetics and the Master of Genetics degree. 

Minor in Genetics 

The Department of Genetics offers an undergraduate minor in genetics to provide students with strong preparation in the principles of 
genetics as well as preparation in ancillary fields such as statistics, biochemistry and microbiology. This minor is appropriate for (but 
not limited to) students with majors in agronomy, animal science, biochemistry, biological sciences, botany, crop science, 
environmental sciences, fisheries and wildlife sciences, food science, forestry, horticultural science, medical technology, 
microbiology, poultry science, and zoology. The genetics minor requires 18 hours-- 15 specified and 3 elective. A grade ofC" or 
better is required for all courses to fulfill the genetics minor requirements. 



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College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 



DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE 

Kilgore Hall, Room 120 
phone: (919)515-3131 

J. Komegay, Head 

B. H. Lane, Undergraduate Coordinator 

D. J. Werner, Director of Graduate Programs 

D. W. Monks, Department Extension Leader 

R. E. Lyons, Director, JC Raulston Aboretum 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: B.H. Lane; William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor: D.M. Pharr, JC 
Raulston Distinguished Professor and Director of JC Raulston Arboretum: R.E. Lyons; Professors: J.R. Ballington, Jr., T.E. 
Bilderback, S.M. Blankenship, F.A. Blazich, S.D. Clouse, PR. Fantz, W.C. Fonteno, R.G. Gardner, L.E. Hinesley, W.E. Hooker, R.E. 
Lyons, T.J. Monaco, D.W. Monks, J.C. Neal, PV. Nelson, M.M. Peet, D.M. Pharr, E.B. Poling, M.A. Powell, T.G. Ranney, D.C. 
Sanders, J.R. Schultheis, C.R. Unrath, S.L. Warren, T.C. Wehner, D.J. Werner; Faculty Emeriti: W.E. Ballinger, A.A. Banaduga, L. 
Bass, J.R. Brooks, Jr., F.D. Cochran, H.M. Covington, A.A. DeHertogh, J.H. Harris, W.R. Henderson, G.R. Hughes, J.M. Jenkins, 
T.R. Konsler, J.W. Love, CM. Mainland, C.H. Miller, D.T. Pope, W.A. Skroch, J.H. Wilson, Jr.; Adjunct Professors: W.W. Collins, 
R.L. Sawyer, P.S. Zoner; Associate Professors: J.D. Burton, N.G. Creamer, J.M. Davis, J.M. Dole, G.M. Fernandez, M.L. Parker, B.H. 
Whipker; Adjunct Associate Professor: F.C. Wise; Assistant Professors: W.G. Buhler, RA. Lindsey, A.M. Spafford, GC. Yencho; 
Adjunct Assistant Professor: C.E. Niedziela; Lecturer: B.H. Lane; Research Associate Professor: J.D. Williamson; Research 
Assistant Professor: B.R. Sosinski; Researchers: R.B. Batts, K.V. Pecota, S.D. Rooks; Extension Specialist: R.E. Bir; Extension 
Associates: R.A. Allen, E.D. Evans, W.R. Jester, W.E. Mitchem; Assistant Director of JC Raulston Aboretum: F.T. Lasseigne; 
Associate Members of the Faculty: G.E. Hoyt (Soil Science), M.D. Boyette (Biological and Agricultural Engineering), F.H. Yelverton 
(Crop Science). 

Horticulture is a dynamic segment of agriculture. The development, growth, distribution, and utilization of fruits, vegetables, flowers, 
and ornamental plants plus the arts of floral design and landscaping enriches our lives with nutritious foods and more attractive 
surroundings. North Carolina's varied climatic conditions favor the production of a wide variety of horticultural crops on a 
commercial scale, as is the development of parks and gardens. The population and amount of industry in the state are increasing, and 
with them the use of ornamental plants. Designers skilled in residential and commercial landscaping, interior plantscaping, and plant 
maintenance are in high demand. This has created an increased demand for plants and information about gardening by the consumer. 

Undergraduate programs in horticultural science offer a broad based education in physical and biological sciences and a sound 
cultural background. Students can concentrate in areas of fruit and vegetable science, floriculture, woody ornamental plant science, 
landscape design, or pursue a general approach encompassing all the specialties. They are prepared for graduate study or for diverse 
professional service. 

Opportunities 

Horticulture graduates fill positions in production, processing, sales and service. Among these are county extension agents; 
vocational agriculture teachers; landscape designers, landscape contractors; farm operators; orchard, nursery, greenhouse, and garden 
center managers; research, production and promotional specialists with commercial seed, floral fertilizer, chemical and food 
companies; inspectors and quality control technologists; USDA specialists and leaders in other phases of agricultural and industrial 
developments. Students may also prepare for careers in research, teaching or extension in horticulture. 

Curricula 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in horticultural science can be earned in either science or technology. Under the 
science curriculum, specialized education is offered in fruit and vegetable crops, floriculture, and ornamental horticulture. Under the 
technology curriculum, education is offered in landscape design or in a general approach, which allows for specialization. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Science Curriculum in Horticultural Science 

Technology Curriculum in Horticultural Science, General Horticulture Concentration 

Minor in Horticultural Science 

The academic minor in Horticultural Science is offered to students who desire a strong foundation in the principles of horticultural 
science. Students may choose to enhance their own major by selecting courses in a specialized area of horticulture such as fruits and 
vegetables, ornamentals, floriculture, or landscape horticulture, or they may pursue a more general approach to the entire field of 
study. Sixteen or seventeen credit hours are required for the minor, depending on courses selected. 



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DEPARTMENT OF MICROBIOLOGY 

CJardncr Hall, Room 45 15 
phone: (919)515-2391 

H. M. Hassan, Head 

G. H. Luginbuhl, Undergraduate Coordinator 

S. M. Laster, Director of Graduate Programs 

Professors: P.E. Bishop (USDA), W.J, Dobrogosz, H.M. Hassan, J.M. Mackenzie, L.W. Parks; 
Professor Emeriti: G. H. Elkan, J.J. Perry; Adjunct Professors: L.A. Casas, R.E. Kanich, T. Melton, 
S.R. Tove; Associate Professors: J.W. Brown, S.J. Libby; Adjunct Associate Professors: J. Caplan, 
J.M. Ligon; Assistant Professor: A. Grundon, M.R. Hyman. J.W. Olson, M.L. Sikes; Adjunct 

Assistant Professors: W. Casey, S.H. Shore; Teaching Technician: W.P. Grumpier, V.M. Knowlton; Lab Supervisor: T.J. Schneeweis; 

Associate Members of the Faculty: C. Altier (Veterinary Medicine), P. Arasu (Veterinary Medicine), D.T. Brown (Biochemistry). F.J. 

Fuller (Veterinary Medicine), L. Jaykus (Food Science), R. Kelly (Chemical Engineering), T.R. Klaenhammer (Food Science), W.E. 

KIoos (Genetics), P.E. Omdorff (Veterinary Medicine), B. Sherry (Veterinary Medicine), J.C.H. Shih (Poultry Science), R.G. 

Upchurch (Plant Pathology). 

The microbiology program provides basic preparation in microbiology, virology, and immunology for professional microbiologists 
and students in other sciences and an awareness of the microbial world as it relates to our daily lives for non-science majors. 

Microbiology is concerned with the growth and development, physiology, classification, ecology, genetics, and other aspects of the 
life process of an array of microscopic, generally single-celled, organisms and viruses. These organisms frequently serve as model 
systems for elucidation of fundamental processes that are common to all living cells. Most of the major discoveries that have 
produced the spectacular advances in biology and genomic science during the past decade have resulted from studies of microbial 
systems. Future developments in biotechnology, production of food and fuel, and human and animal health will rely heavily on 
understanding microbial processes. 

Opportunities 

Microbiologists are employed in university, governmental and industrial research laboratories, diagnostic, environmental and quality 
control laboratories, teaching, and technical sales and service positions. 

Curricula 

The microbiology curriculum leads to a Bachelor of Science degree and is designed to provide the student with a strong foundation in 
mathematics, chemistry, and physics, and skills in oral and written communication. The student will also gain broad general 
knowledge of molecular and cellular biology as well as a foundation in the basic areas of microbiology, virology, and immunology. 
Graduates of this curriculum will be prepared for work in research laboratories and production facilities or for further study in 
graduate and professional schools. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online; www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Minor in Microbiology 

The Department of Microbiology offers an undergraduate minor available to all baccalaureate degree students at North Carolina State 
University who are not majoring in microbiology. The minor is especially appropriate for (but not limited to) students majoring in the 
biological or agricultural sciences, physical sciences, or science education. 

The minor requires 15 semester hours including 8 hours of required courses and 7 hours from a group of restricted electives. Any 
prerequisite courses are in addition to these courses. A grade of C or better is required for all courses taken to fulfill the minor 
requirements. 

CURRICULA IN NATURAL RESOURCES 

A. W. Oltmans, Undergraduate Coordinator Agricultural and Resource Economics 
Nelson Hall Room 233E 

H. J. Kleiss, Undergraduate Coordinator Soil Science 
Williams Hall. Room 2321 

Wise use of all our natural resources (soil, water, air, minerals, flora, fauna, and people) for the benefit of current and future members 
of societ>' is the goal of natural resource management. This important challenge recognizes the interdependence of people with their 
environment and requires an integrated, multi-disciplinarv approach to solving society's resource problems. Population growth, 
rising incomes, life style changes and urbanization lead to more intensive use of all natural resources. These trends present challenges 
to resource managers who must be trained in the basic principles of several disciplines in order to develop and apply sound 
management strategies to our resource problems. Natural resource professionals must understand resources and the social systems 
governing their use. They must be able to work in teams to analyze potential effects of resource use and to design ways to make 
etTicient use of natural and environmental resources for current and future generations. 

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To accommodate the breadth and complexity of natural resource management, the Bachelor of Science degree in Natural Resources 
is a campus-wide program involving three colleges and four departments that administer seven concentrations. A common core of 84 
credit hours of course work provides a balanced foundation in communication, humanities, social sciences, mathematics and the 
natural sciences. The core course requirements include a freshman orientation course and a senior level applications course that 
natural resource majors in all concentrations must complete. Within the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, three 
concentrations are available: Economics and Management, Soil Resources, and Soil and Water Systems. For information on other 
concentrations see the Department of Forestry in the College of Natural Resources and the Department of Marine, Earth and 
Atmospheric Sciences in the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Curriculum in Natural Resources, Economics and Management Concentration 
Curriculum in Natural Resources, Soil Resources Concentration 
Curriculum in Natural Resources, Soil and Water Systems 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT PATHOLOGY 

Gardner Hall, Room 2518 
phone: (919)515-2730 

J. W. Moyer, Department Head 
T. A. Melton, Departmental Extension Leader 
D. F. Ritchie, Director of Graduate Programs 
L. F. Grand, Teaching Coordinator 

Professors: O.W. Bamett, Jr., D.M. Benson, R.I. Bruck, M.E. Daub, J.M. Davis (Head, Department of Botany), R.A. Dean, L.F. 
Grand, J.S. Huang, S. Leath (USDA), S.A. Lommel (Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research), D.S. Marshall (USDA- Research 
Leader), T.A. Melton (Phillip J. Morris Professor), J.W. Moyer, C.H. Opperman, GA. Payne, J.B. Ristanio, D.F. Ritchie, H.D. Shew, 
T.B. Sutton; Professors Emeriti: J.L. Apple, C.W. Averre, III, R. Aycock, K.R. Barker, D.F. Bateman (Dean Emeritus), M.K. Beute, 
G.V. Gooding, Jr., A.S. Heagle (USDA), R.K. Jones, A. Kelman (University Distinguished Scholar), C.E. Main, R.D. Milholland, 
N.T. Powell, R.A. Reinert (USDA), J.R Ross, J.N. Sasser, RB. Shoemaker (Philip J. Morris Professor), H.W. Spurr, Jr., (USDA), 
D.L. Strider, H.H. Triantaphyllou, J.C. Wells, N.N. Winstead; Associate Professors: D. McK. Byrd, M.A. Cubeta, E.L. Davis, B.C. 
Haning, P.B. Lindgren, G.J. Holmes, F. Louws, R.G. Upchurch (USDA); Assistant Professors: I. Carbone, S. Hu, L.P. Tredway, C.Y. 
Warfield; Research Assistant Professors: S.R. Koenning, T.K. Mitchell, B.B. Shew; Research and Extension Specialist: W.O. Cline; 
Director: Z. Pesic-VanEsbroeck; Adjunct Assistant and Associate Members of the Faculty: E.B. Cowling (University Distinguished 
Professor-at-Large), G.M. Hellman (R.J. Reynolds), J.L. Imbriani (NCDA), D.T. Kaplin (USDA, FL), M.D. Law (Novartis), CM. 
Liddell (Paradigm Genetics), K.J. Leonard (USDA), S.C. Redlin (USDA), S. Spencer (NCDA), V. Subbiah (R.J. Reynolds). 

Undergraduate instruction in plant pathology is designed to provide introductory and advanced courses on the nature and control of 
plant diseases to students majoring in crop science, horticultural science, agricultural education and forestry. It also provides 
fundamental training necessary for graduate study in plant pathology. Thanks to the generosity of Dr. Arthur and Mrs. Helen Kelman, 
family and friends, the Department offers the S.E. Kelman Memorial Scholarship to one or more outstanding undergraduates enrolled 
either in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, or the College of Natural Resources. Selected applicants will gain research 
experience as interns working under the supervision of a faculty member in the Department of Plant Pathology. For details of this 
scholarship program, consult www.cals.ncsu.edu/plantpath/kelman.html. 

Opportunities 

Employment in research, extension and teaching is available to graduates with advanced degrees in plant pathology. Research 
openings are typically with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, state experiment stations, industry and private consulting. The rapid 
development of agricultural chemicals, biotechnology and other methods for disease control offers numerous opportunities 




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DEPARTMENT OF POLLTRV SCIENCE 

Scott Hall, Room 203 
phone: (919)515-2626 

G. B. Havenstein, Head 
B.W. Sheldon, Department Extension Leader 
S. L. Pardue, Undergraduate Coordinator 
J.T. Brake, Director of Graduate Programs 

William Neal Reynolds Professor: J.T. Brake; Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: C.R. 
Parkhurst, S.L. Pardue; Professors: K.E. Anderson, V.L. Christensen, W.J. Croom, Jr., G.S. Davis, 
F.W. Edens, RR. Ferket, J.L. Grimes, W.M. Hagler, Jr, GB. Havenstein, J.F. Ort, J.N. Petitte, B.W. 
Sheldon, J.C.H. Shih. T.D. Slopes, M.J. Wineland; Adjunct Professors: M.R. Bakst, D. Balnave, W.L. 
Bryden, R.R. Diertert, K..K. Kxueger, K.A. Schat, S.M. Shane, Z. Uni; Professors Emeriti: T.A. Carter, 
J.D. Garlich. E.W. Glazener, P.B. Hamilton, J.R. Harris, C.H. Hill; Associate Professors: D.K. Carver, 
CM. Williams; Adjunct Associate Professors: C.E. Whitfill; Assistant Professors: A. Gemat, P.E. Mozdziak; Adjunct Assistant 
Professors: T.F. Middleton, C.J. Williams; Associate Members of Faculty: K..M. Keener (Food Science), A.M. Miles (College of 
Veterinary Medicine), S.M. Stringham (Entomology), D.P. Wages (College of Veterinary Medicine). 

The Department of Poultry Science provides instruction in the principles of vertically integrated poultry production and in such 
related fields as nutrition, physiology, genetics, immunology, toxicology, biotechnology, and general poultry management. Through 
teaching, research, and extension, the department serves students, poultry producers, and allied industries. Poultry production has 
increased rapidly during the last two decades and ranks first in North Carolina as a source of agricultural income. North Carolina 
ranks third nationally in the production of poultry products; the climatic and economic conditions in the state provide a sound base 
for continued expansion. 

Opportunities 

The change from small farm operations to large commercial poultry enterprises has created more specialized positions than there are 
available poultry graduates. Production-oriented positions and off-the-farm operations in activities such as processing and 
distribution offer new job opportunities. The allied industries— feed, equipment, financing, pharmaceutical and other supplies— need 
more employees trained in poultry science. Graduates hold positions as managers and field representatives for business identified 
with or serving the poultry industry. Graduates hold positions as managers and field representatives for businesses identified with or 
serving the poultry industry. Graduates are also employed in communication and public relations, as teachers, and as extension and 
research specialists. Some graduates develop their own poultry businesses. 

Curricula 

Students desiring the Bachelor of Science with a major in poultry science may choose either the science or the technology curriculum 
offered by the Department of Poultry Science. One may obtain a double major in certain other curricula through careful use of 
electives and/or summer school attendance. The student should consult the undergraduate advisers in the department(s) concerned. 
Currently, the pre-veterinary science student may utilize all requirements toward a Bachelor of Science degree in the science option. 
The science curriculum is for the student interested in the basic biological and physical sciences. These students are better prepared 
for advanced study in various disciplines such as genetics, nutrition, physiology, and pathology. Several pre-veterinary students are 
currently enrolled in this curriculum and are seeking a Bachelor of Science degree in poultry science. (See the Preprofessional 
Program in Veterinary Medicine). 

The technology curriculum in poultry science is designed to prepare students for direct entry into the poultry industry upon 
graduation; allows a greater selection of courses in business and economics; and offers a student both basic and applied knowledge in 
poultry production which can be used directly in a poultry operation upon graduation. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Science Curriculum in Poultry Science 
Technology Curriculum in Poultry Science 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

(See Humanities and Social Sciences) 
1911 Building, Room 301 
phone: (919)515-3180 

W. B. Clifi'ord, Head 

P. L. McCall, Associate Head 

D. A. Curran, Undergraduate Coordinator 

D. T. Tomaskovic-Devey, Director of Graduate Programs 

S. C. Lilley, Department Extension Leader 



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Sociology Teaching, Research and Extension Faculty: Goodnight-Glaxo Wellcome Endowed Professor: C.R. Tittle; William Neal 
Reynolds Professor: R.C. Wimberly; Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor: M.D. Schulman; Alumni Distinguished 
Undergraduate Professor: L.R. Delia Fave; Professors: V.M. Aldige, W.B, Clifford, T.J. Hoban, J.C. Leiter, RL. McCall, R.L. 
Moxley, B.J. Risman, D.T. Tomaskovic-Devey, E.M. Woodrum, M.A. Zahn, M.T. Zingraff; Professors Emeriti: J.N. Collins, E.M. 
Crawford, T.N. Hobgood, Jr., L.B. Otto, M.M. Sawhney, M.E. Voland, J.N. Young; Associate Professors: M.R Atkinson, R.F. Czaja, 
R.L. Engen, T.N. Greenstein, S.C. Lilley, M.L. Schwalbe, W.R. Smith, M.E. Thomas, M.S. Thompson, R.J. Thomson, K.M. Troost; 
Associate Professors Emeriti: R.C. Brisson, S.K. Garber, PR Thompson; Assistant Professors: S.M. DeCoster; Assistant Professors 
Emeriti: C.G. Dawson, T.M. Hyman; Associate Member of the Faculty: R.D. Mustian (Agricultural and Extension Education); 
Adjunct Professor: A. Thompson (NC A&T University); Adjunct Associate Professor: J.R. Thigpen (East Carolina University). C.R. 
Zimmer (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). 

Anthropology Teaching and Research Faculty: Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: A.L. Schiller; Associate Professor: 
J.M. Wallace; Associate Professors Emeriti: G.S. Nickerson, J.G. Peck, I. Rovner, M.L. Walek; Assistant Professor: R.S. Ellovich. 

This department teaches students the principles and techniques for understanding human group behavior. More specifically the 
department seeks to educate students in understanding communities and organizations and the people who live and work within them, 
to qualify exceptional students at the undergraduate and graduate level for sociological research, teaching, and extension careers and 
to solve problems in human group relations. Applied sociology is good training for a wide variety of careers. It is useful for any job 
that involves work with people, organizations or communities. It is also good preparation for professional organizations or 
communities and for professional careers in local government, personnel relations, law, the clergy, business and management. 

Curricula 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in applied sociology is offered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. This 
degree includes the study of applied sociological topics and specialty courses in criminology that provide a general background in 
deviance, juvenile delinquency, the course system and correctional facilities, including field placement in an agency of criminal 
justice system. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Curriculum in Applied Sociology 
Curriculum in Criminology 

Minor in Applied Sociology 

The minor in Applied Sociology is aimed at providing a student with the basic conceptual framework of sociology and the 
infomiation necessary for applying this approach to the resolutions of problems in work and organizational environments. The minor 
requires 15 credit hours of coursework consisting of required and elective courses, and a grade of "C or better is required for all 
courses used to fulfill the minor requirements. 



DEPARTMENT OF SOIL SCIENCE 

Williams Hall, Room 2234 
phone: (919)515-2655 

D.K. Cassel, Head, Director of Graduate Programs 
D. L. Osmond, Department Extension Leader 
H. J. Kleiss, Undergraduate Program Coordinator 

Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor: S.W. Buol; William Neal Reynolds Professors: 
S.W. Buol, J.W. Gilliam; Professors: A. Amoozegar, S.W. Broome, D.K. Cassel, M.T. 
Hoover, GD. Hoyt, D.W. Israel (USDA), H.J. Kleiss, CD. Raper, W.R Robarge, T.J. Smyth, 
M.J. Vepraskas, M.G. Wagger; Adjunct Professors: PG. Hunt, R.L. Mikkelsen; Professors 
Emeriti: M.G. Cook, F.R. Cox, C.B. Davey, W.A. Jackson, E.J. Kamprath, L.D. King, G.S. 
Miner, J. A. Phillips, PA. Sanchez, R.J. Volk, A.G. Wollum; Associate Professors: D.A. 
Crouse, C.R. Crozier, D.L. Hesterberg, D.L. Lindbo, R.A. McLaughlin, D.L. Osmond; 
Associate Professors Emeriti: J. P. Lilly, R.E. McCollum, G.C. Naderman, J.E. Shelton: 
Adjunct Associate Professors: R.C. Reich, R. Tucker; Assistant Professors: J.W. Rideout. W. 
Shi, J. A. Thompson, J.G. White; Adjunct Assistant Professors: C. Bogle, D. Hardy, C.K. 
Martin, B.F. McQuaid, B. Zanner; Associate Members of the Faculty: H.L. Allen (Forestry), 
T. Grove (Zoology), R.W. Skaggs (Biological Agricultural Engineering), J.B. Weber (Crop 
Science), J. Zublena (Cooperative Extension Service). 

The Department of Soil Science trains students in fundamentals of soils, develops an 
understanding and appreciation of soils as a resource, and presents principles of soil 
management and utilization for both farm and non-agricultural purposes. Soils constitute one of the largest capital investments in 
fanning, and proper soil management is essential for efficient production. Future world food needs will require people conversant in 
soil resources and use of fertilizers. Soil properties are important considerations in urban-suburban planning and development. Also, 
knowledge of soil and its interaction with potential pollutants is essential in maintaining environmental quality. Therefore, the 
demand for people trained in soils by private consultants, agribusiness, research, service planning-development, education and 
conservation-related agencies should continue to be great. 




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Opportunity 

Soil science graduates till positions of leadership and service in land resource planning, environmental science, conservation, natural 
resource management and agriculture. Among these are opportunities as: farm operators and managers; county agricultural extension 
agents; employees of other public advisory agencies; and Natural Resources Conservation Service and other conservation-related 
agencies concerned with soil resources. Graduates also serve as technical representatives and salesmen in fertilizer companies and in 
other agribusiness activities. Many opportunities e.\ist for privately consulting soil scientists who serve a variety of clientele needs. 
Environmental concerns usually require soil science expertise, especially in land-based waste management. Provisions are made for 
students wishing for more thorough training in biological sciences, chemistry, mathematics and physics leading to graduate study. 
(See the Graduate Catalog for a listing of graduate degrees). Students with an advanced degree have greater opportunities in teaching, 
research, service and extension with state, federal and private educational or research institutions and agencies. 

Curricula 

The Bachelor of Science degree may be obtained with a major in agronomy, natural resources or environmental sciences. The 
Agronomy Program is administered jointly with the Crop Science Department. A soil science concentration is available in the 
Agronomy curriculum. Two soils concentrations are available in the Natural Resources curriculum. Soil Resources and Soil and 
Water Resource Systems. An Environmental Soil Science concentration is available in the Environmental Sciences curriculum. (The 
Agronomy, Natural Resources, and Environmental Sciences curricula are shown previously within the College of Agriculture and 
Life Sciences). 

Minor in Soil Science 

The minor in Soil Science is offered to students desiring a strong knowledge of the principles of Soil Science to complement their 
major. The program is intended to strengthen the understanding of basic physical and chemical soil properties that would be relevant 
to students interested in land management. These interests may include (but are not limited to) Forestry, Geology, Natural Resources. 
Environmental Sciences, Agronomy, Landscape Architecture, Horticulture, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural 
Business Management, or Agricultural Education. Fourteen hours of required courses and three hours of electives are necessary to 
complete the minor. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Gardner Hall, Room 3212 
phone: (919)515-2741 
www.cals.ncsu.edu/zoology 

T. L. Grove, Head 

J. F. Gilliam, Undergraduate Coordinator 

J. A. Rice, Director of Graduate Programs 

Professors: R.H. Anholt, B.L.Black, J.A. Collazo (USDl), J.F. Gilliam, W.C. 
Grant, R.M. Grossfeld, T.L. Grove, H.F. Heatwole, J.E. Hightower (USDl), 
C.F. Lytle, J.M. Miller, K.H. Pollock, R.A. Powell, J.A. Rice, C.V. Sullivan, 
H.A. Underwood; Adjunct Professors: F.A. Cross, L.B. Crowder. D.E. Hoss, 
GR. Huntsman, P.H. Kelley, G.W. Thayer; Professors Emeriti: P.T. Bromley, 
RC. Bradbury, B.J. Copeland, W.W. Hassler, M.T. Huish, G.C. Miller, R.L. 
Noble, T.L. Quay, J.F. Roberts, D.E. Smith, J.G. Vandenbergh; Associate 
Professors: R.K. Borski, H.V. Daniels, J.R. Godwin, J.M. Hinshaw, R.G. 
Hodson, T.J. Kwak (USDl), S.C. Mozley, M. Niedzlek-Feaver, T.R. Simons 
(USDl); Adjunct Associate Professors: W.J. Fleming, C.S. Manooch. K. 
Ritters, R.M. Shelley, H.W. van de Veer; Assistant Professors: J.A. Bucknel, 
B.J. Brizuela, N.M. Haddad, J.A. Lubischer, PS. Rand; Adjunct Assistant 
Professors: E.M. Bennett, A.E. Bogan, S.V. Chiavetta, J.A, Hare, R.J. 
Kavlock, R.W. Laney, M.R. Meador, M.S. Mitchell, W.E. Palmer, W.C. 
Stames; Adjunct Instructors: A.L. Braswell, R.B. Hamilton; Associate 
Members of the Faculty: E.J. Jones (Extension Forest Resources), S.B. 
Harvey (Biological & Agricultural Engineering), S. Rebach (NC Sea Grant). 
T.G. Wolcott (Engineering and Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences). 

The Department of Zoology provides undergraduate and graduate instruction in specialized biological sciences areas. Undergraduates 
study all levels of biological organization from the molecular to the community. Zoology majors are well prepared for graduate work 
in zoology and related fields of sciences. (See the Graduate Catalog for a listing of graduate degrees). Participation in super\'ised 
programs of research is strongly encouraged. A strong science background is provided for students planning to enter dentistry, 
medicine, optometry, veterinary medicine and allied health sciences, such as medical technology, physical therapy, and physician 
assistant. Ecology, including wildlife, fisheries, behavioral ecology and marine biology, is a strong area. Cellular and molecular 
biology, including reproductive endocrinology and neurobiology, are also emphasized. 




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Opportunities 

Bachelor of Science graduates in zoology have many career options. Graduates are well prepared for employment in various 
government agencies or private industries. Graduates may continue their education with studies leading to advanced degrees in many 
areas of biological sciences such as zoology, cell biology, wildlife and fisheries science, marine science and biomedical disciplines. 
Many also choose to seek degrees in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine and other health-related areas. 

Curricula 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in zoology is offered in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Within this major 
a student may specialize to pursue individual interests. 

The zoology curriculum (SZO) prepares students for graduate school, medical, dental or optometry school (SZO/SDM), and for 
veterinary schools (SZO/SPV). Certain professional schools have specific requirements which differ slightly from the zoology 
curriculum. Students should consult catalogs of specific professional schools to ensure completion of any special requirements. 

Other curricula offered by the Department of Zoology include the fisheries (SFF) and wildlife (SFW) sciences program and the 
environmental science program in ecology (ESC). Students are advised by faculty in their special areas of interest. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Minor in Zoology 

A minor in zoology is available to all baccalaureate students at NC State University, except majors in other curricula within the 
Zoology Department (Biological Sciences, Fisheries, and Wildlife Science, and Environmental Science Ecology Concentration 
(ESC)). This minor will be useful to students applying to professional schools such as medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, and 
other health sciences. Basic knowledge in animal biology may be useful to students seeking careers in government, industry, or 
education. The minor consists of a minimum of 15-16 credit hours, including three core courses: ZO 150*, ZO 250*, and ZO 260*. 
The remaining courses must be selected from three- or four-credit zoology courses. 

* Grade of "C-" or better is required. 

NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE 

Patterson Hall, Room 100 

J. C. Wynne, Interim Dean, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

S. Leath, Interim Director and Associate Dean of NC Agricultural Research Service 

R. Crickenberger, Associate Director, NC Agricultural Research Service 

W. K. Collins, Coordinator, Tobacco Programs 

W. Hagler, Interim Assistant Director, Agricultural Sciences 

G. Gibson, Part-time Assistant Director, Life Sciences 

The North Carolina Agricultural Research Service is the agricultural, life sciences, forestry, and home economics research agency of 
the State of North Carolina. It is funded principally by appropriations from the North Carolina General Assembly, federal formula 
fiinds, grants, and contracts. 

The N.C. Agricultural Research Service provides the following public services: 

conducts research on the development and maintenance of an effective agricultural and forestry industry in North Carolina, 
including economically sound sources of supplies and equipment needed in agriculture and forestry and market outlets for the 
products of agriculture and forestry; 

• improves rural homes, rural life, and rural environment; 

maintains a reliable supply of agricultural and forestry products for the consuming public. This requires research to solve current 
problems and research to provide a foundation of scientific knowledge in the biological, physical, and social sciences. 

The N.C. Agricultural Research Service faculty brings well-trained personnel to the university whose teaching in many specialized 
fields of agriculture, biology, and the social sciences assures the maintenance of curricula of high standards. It contributes to the 
advanced training of students who are destined to become the leaders, teachers, and investigators necessary in the maintenance of a 
viable agriculture and forestry industry. 

Publications 

The N.C. Agricultural Research Service publishes bulletins and scientific papers on research conducted by the staff. Copies of 
bulletins may be obtained from the Department of Communication Services and scientific papers from authors. 

Services 

The faculty of the N.C. Agricultural Research Service conduct original and other research bearing directly on and contributing to the 
establishment and maintenance of permanent and effective agricultural and forestry industries in North Carolina. This research 

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College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 



includes field and laboratory experimentation in the biological, physical, social, and environmental sciences. Primary emphasis his 
given to the production, processing, distribution, and consumption of the many agricultural and forestry commodities produced 
throughout the state. Also, major attention is given to research programs aimed at improving the quality of life of both rural and urban 
peoples. 

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE 

Ricks Hall, Room 104 

J. C. Wynne, Interim Dean, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 
J. F. Ort, Associate Dean, Cooperative Extension Service 
J. R Zublena, Associate Director, and Director of County Operations 
T. McKinney, Interim Head, 4-H and Youth 

The Cooperative Extension Service of North Carolina State University is a cooperative undertaking among the United States 
Department of Agriculture, the State of North Carolina, the 100 countries in the state and the Cherokee Indian Reservation. Its work 
is supported by federal funds made available under the Smith-Level Act of 1914, as amended by state and county appropriations, and 
by grants and contracts. 

The federal and state appropriations are used to maintain an administrative and specialist staff and to pay a portion of the salary and 
the travel expenses of the county extension agents. Under this cooperative arrangement, the Cooperative Extension Service serves as 
the "educational arm" of the United States Department of Agriculture and as the "field faculty" of North Carolina State University in 
the areas of agriculture and natural resources, family living, 4-H youth, and community and rural development. 

The primary purpose of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service is to provide the people of the state with the latest and best 
information— particularly that which is related to agriculture and natural resources, home economics, and youth, and rural 
development- and help them to interpret and use this information to build a more prosperous and satisfying life. 

This program has sufficient flexibility to permit special attention, needs and interests of the people in each county. County Advisory 
Councils are utilized to detemiine and prioritize the county educational program content. Assistance is given to individuals, families, 
communities, agricultural and seafood processing and marketing firms, other business and certain organizations. This includes work 
with adults and youth in both the city and rural areas. 

In carrying out this educational program, a variety of methods and techniques are employed: method and result demonstrations; 
meetings; visits to farms, homes and businesses; organized groups of men, women and youth; tours; leaflets, pamphlets and other 
printed materials and mass media. 

The basic sources of information to be taught through this educational program are the findings and recommendations resulting from 
research conducted by the Agricultural Research Service in this and other states and by the United States Department of Agriculture. 

AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE 

Patterson Hall, Room 107 

J. C. Wynne Interim Dean, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

K. L. Esbenshade, Associate Dean, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Director, Academic Programs 

J. C. Comwell, Associate Director of Academic Programs and Director, Agricultural Institute 

The Agricultural Institute is a two-year academic program that awards the Associate of Applied Science Degree upon successful 
completion of at least one often curricula. The Agricultural Institute provides education and training in pest management, livestock 
management, agriculture, horticulture, turfgrass management and agribusiness. It is part of the academic programs in the College of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences at North Carolina State University. Provision for the Agricultural Institute was made by the 1 959 North 
Carolina General Assembly and instruction began in the fall, 1960. The objective of the Agricultural Institute is to provide technical 
training for those desiring a comprehensive education in the food and agricultural sciences, agribusiness and related areas. The 
instructional programs of the Agricultural Institute are organized and conducted as part of the overall academic program in the 
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The Agricultural Institute is an addition to. and not a substitute for, the college's regular 
degree-granting program. The Agricultural Institute uses the same facilities (classrooms, laboratories, farms) as the four-year 
program. The facilities are used extensively for both teaching and observ ing the application of technology in agriculture and other 
closely related areas. 

The faculty of the four-year program are responsible for organizing and teaching courses offered by the Agricultural Institute. 
Emphasis is placed on practical knowledge and training, with many courses requiring laboratories using hands-on experience. The 
Agricultural Institute offers majors in ten areas: Agribusiness Management; Field Crops Technology; General Agriculture; Livestock 
Management and Technology (General. Swine & Poultry Options); Ornamentals and Landscape Technology; Pest Management 
(Agricultural and Urban Options); and Turfgrass Management. 



84 



College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 



Opportunities 

Rapid technical advancement has been important in changing agriculture from a small production industry to the nation's largest 
industry. Closely associated with production agriculture are those areas related to recreation and beautification such as turfgrass 
management, landscaping and ornamental plants. 

Today's complex agriculture requires a large work force. This work force must have some technical training and be able to deal with 
a vast array of problems and opportunities. Graduates of the Agricultural Institute have the education and training that is in demand 
by the food and agricultural industries and that permit them to assume responsible positions in agriculture and allied fields. Some 
career examples include farm and herd managers, golf course superintendents, nursery managers, pest control specialists, quality 
control technicians, food service supervisors, sales and service of agricultural equipment and products, food inspectors, lawn care 
specialists and others. More job opportunities than graduates make salaries attractive and competitive. The College of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences maintains a Career Services Office to assist graduates in addressing resume construction, interviewing strategies, 
successful job search techniques, location of summer internships, and job market trends. 

Entrance Requirements 

Applicants must have graduated from an accredited high school with at least a 2.0 GPA (on a 4.0 system), or have successfully passed 
the General Education Development (GED) test before being admitted to the Agricultural Institute at NC State. An admission 
application and supporting documents must be submitted directly to the Admissions Office at NC State University. The regular 
college entrance exam (Scholastic Aptitude Test- SAT) is not required. The 2.00 minimum high school GPA is waived for transfer 
students and for applicants 21 years or older at the time of enrollment in the Agricultural Institute. 

For additional information, write: Director, Agricultural Institute, Box 7642, 107 Patterson Hall, North Carolina State University, 
Raleigh, NC 27695-7642, phone; (919)515-3428, web site: www.ncsu.edu/cals/agi. 

Programs of Study 

Graduates of the Agricultural Institute are awarded the Associate of Applied Science degree. The ten programs of study are 
Agribusiness Management; Pest Management and Technology (Agricultural and Urban Options); Field Crops Technology; 
Ornamentals and Landscape Technology; General Agriculture; Livestock Management and Technology (General Livestock Option, 
Poultry Option, Swine Option); and Turfgrass Management. 

Now in its fifth decade, the College of Design at North Carolina State University has from the beginning prepared designers who, in 
the broadest sense, shape the world. Design education is more than an attempt to teach a set of technical skills. The environment- 
including the spaces in which people live and work, the products they consume, and the messages they receive- have a powerful 
impact on how humans function as a society. Good design, therefore, requires attention and sensitivity to social, economic, political, 
cultural, and behavioral issues. The aim of all design curricula in the College of Design is to develop the designer's perception, 
knowledge, skills, and problem-solving abilities. 



85 



COLLEGE OF DESIGN 




200 Brooks Hall 

NCSU Box 7701 

Raleigh, NC 27695-7701 

phone: (919)515-8310 

fax: (919)515-7330 

e-mail: design(a ncsu.edu 

www.design.ncsu.edu 



Marvin J. Malecha, Dean 

John Tector, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs 

Fatih Rit"ki, Associate Dean for Graduate Academic Affairs 

James D. Tomlinson, Assistant Dean for Research, Extension, and Engagement 

Marva Motley, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs 

Dottie Haynes, Assistant Dean for Administration 



College of Design 



The College of Design admits students through a selective process that ensures a highly motivated and heterogeneous design 
community. The entering student body consistently ranks at the top of academic achievement in the university and the college 
graduation rates are the highest in the institution. While providing undergraduate and graduate study in multiple disciplines and 
encouraging individual plans of study, the college fianctions as a unified, interactive education center, dedicated to preparing 
designers capable of shaping the environment to various scales, but always in response to society's needs. 

Design Fundamentals - The First Year Experience 

All students entering the College of Design are admitted directly into their specific major of choice. The first year experience consists 
of a common first semester studio and a major based second semester. Each semester earns 6 credit hours and meets 9 hours per 
week. The work outside the class is substantial and is largely carried out in the same communal studio space, with students working 
both independently and in collaboration to solve the problems posed in the class. Most class time is spent in hands-on work, 
discussion, demonstration, critique, or field trips. Emphasis is on interaction, independence, self-discipline, and self-motivation. 

In both semesters, the fundamentals experience emphasizes learning to use the design process, establishing disciplined working 
habits, talking about the work to others (communication with the language learned in the class), and working in collaboration with 
others, thus forming the foundation of all subsequent design work, in the college and in the design professions. 

Curricula and Degrees 

The College of Design offers undergraduate instruction leading to the four-year Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture, 
Bachelor of Art and Design, Bachelor of Graphic Design, and Bachelor of Industrial Design, as well as a five-year degree program 
leading to the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture and a one-year postgraduate program leading to the Bachelor of Architecture 
Degree. The General Education component of each curriculum consists of courses in mathematical and natural sciences, physical 
education, science/technology/society, and communication and information technology. In addition to 6-credit design studios where 
students apply their expanding knowledge and skills to theoretical and practical design problems, majors in the College of Design 
take support courses dealing with design knowledge and skills, such as communication and presentation, human behavior, 
environment, history, philosophy, physical elements and systems, methods and management. The curriculum path has some 
flexibility, affording students the opportunity to concentrate in one area while making contact with the other design disciplines. In 
addition to their faculty mentors, students are exposed to a broad range of design professionals through guest lecturers, juries, 
projects, and workshops. 

Graduate studies are designed for students who want to build on undergraduate education and professional experience, as well as for 
those who come from non-design backgrounds and want to pursue advanced design degrees. The college offers graduate study in the 
Master of Architecture, Master of Graphic Design, Master of Industrial Design, Master of Landscape Architecture, and Ph.D. in 
Design programs. Please refer to the NC State University Graduate Catalog for curriculum information on master's and doctoral 
programs in the College of Design. 

DaVinci Scholars Program 

This joint program between the College of Design and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences 
allows students to earn two undergraduate degrees within five or six years - a bachelor's degree in one of 
the five undergraduate disciplines in the College of Design and a B.A. or B.S. degree in the College of 
Humanities and Social Sciences. 

The primary purpose of the double degree is to provide students with a strong liberal education as a 
complement to their professional interests in design. For example, students majoring in Graphic Design, 
with a second degree that focuses on writing, may improve their opportunities for employment in 
communications. A student in Architecture with a second degree in history may improve opportunities for 
focused graduate study in architectural history, preservation, or urban planning. Study of a foreign 
language may improve students' opportunities for international design practice. 

DaVinci Scholars earn their first degree in design with no adjustment in their design requirements. They elect a second major from 
any of those available in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. Most students complete their second degree within one 
additional year of study or two Summer Sessions plus one additional semester. Students will be designated as DaVinci Scholars only 
during their first year of enrollment in the College of Design. 

To qualify for the DaVinci Scholars Program students must: 

• present a minimum GPA of 3.00 at the end of their first semester of study in the College of Design 

declare interest in the DaVinci Scholars Program in writing to the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs of the 
College of Design within their first year of study in the College of Design 

• be selected by a review panel composed of faculty in the College of Design and faculty in the College of Humanities and Social 
Sciences and chaired by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of the College of Design. 

For more information, please contact office of the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs, College of Design, 200B 
Brooks Hall, Box 7701, NCSU, Raleigh, NC 27695-7701; (919)515-8310 




87 



College of Design 




Minor in Design Studies (Non-Design Majors) 

This minor's objectives are to provide a general orientation to the practice and theory ofdesign for students whose primary study and 
employment will be in the other disciplines, to clarify the role design plays in society, and to create informed consumers who are able 
to make intelligent decisions about communication, products, and environments in work and in their personal lives. Any 
undergraduate student in the university who is not majoring in a design discipline would benefit from this program. Any student 
seeking this minor should contact the Associate Dean for Academic AfTairs in the College of Design for an application and 
assignment of a minor adviser. 

Anni Albers Scholars Program 

The Anni Albers Scholars Program, collaboration between the NC State University College of Design 
and the College of Textiles, provides students simultaneously with exemplary preparation in art and 
design and in textile technology. Because NC State University has both renowned Colleges of Design 
and Textiles, we are in a unique position to provide undergraduate education in textile design, which is 
unparalleled at other institutions in the US. This rigorous program will greatly improve graduates' 
creative flexibility and employment opportunities by combining professional skills in design with high 
quality technological knowledge, making them innovative leaders in the field. 

Students completing the Anni Albers Program will earn two undergraduate degrees; a Bachelor of Art 
and Design in the College of Design, and a Bachelor of Science in Textile Technology in the College 
of Textiles. 

The program is named for a person who exemplifies the ideals and goals to which the program aspires; textile designer and artist 
Anni Albers. Anni Albers was educated in the Weaving Workshop at the Bauhaus and immigrated to the United States from World 
War II Germany. Albers, a noted textile designer, artist, and writer, brought her infiuential beliefs in the importance of textiles to 
Black Mountain School in North Carolina, and eventually to Yale University. Her work and writings have provided generations of 
American textile designers and fiber artists a philosophical framework and standard of excellence against which to measure progress 
and achievement in the medium. 

Resources 

The College of Design offers the Anni Alber Scholars a complete studio-based art and design education, beginning with a firm 
foundation in one of the country's best design fundamentals programs, followed by intensive upper level studios emphasizing design 
process and creative problem solving. Studio-based instruction in textiles is rooted in learning by making with the hands, thus all 
students make textiles on hand looms, and add color and pattern with hand screen printing and dyeing techniques. A basic knowledge 
of textile history underlies the entire curriculum. The Anni Albers Scholars take advantage of the Art and Design Department's broad 
offerings in drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking, color and light, illustration, animation and digital imaging. The college 
provides a hand weaving lab; a printing/dyeing lab; the Harrye B. Lyons Design Library; college and departmental computer labs; 
and materials labs (shop). 

The College of Textiles will provide the Albers Scholars with instruction in textile technology, operations management, textile 
chemistry, and computer technology in textiles and apparel. The curriculum provides a fundamental understanding of textile 
technology in three-dimensional body scanning, direct digital printing on fabric, computer aided design software for both knitted and 
woven fabrics and apparel product development. CAD/CAM facilities are also available for creating fabrics and garments. The 
Model Manufacturing Facility in the college is 100,000 square feet of lab space with industrial scale textile equipment that provides 
complete manufacturing capability from bale-to-sale. Studio space is also available for design of fabrics and garments. 

Anni Albers Dual Degree Requirements 

Applicants to the program must have completed successful admission to both the College of Design (including portfolio review) and 
the College of Textiles through the usual processes and meeting college deadlines. At the same time as applying to the colleges, or 
after arrival at NC State, students may apply to the Anni Albers Program using the form and following the guidelines. All 
applications are reviewed by faculty committees in each college. Students admitted to the program must maintain a minimum 2.8 
GPA to remain in the program. To complete the program successfully, students must meet all requirements for the Bachelor of Art 
and Design degree in the College of Design, and all college-level requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in Textile 
Technology in the College of Textiles, including only one set of 52 credit hours in the General Education Requirements. General 
Education Requirements are arranged to meet the specified choices in both curricula. The degree requires five (5) school years and 
one summer to complete. Eventual scholarship support will make this less of a financial burden on the student and family. On campus 
and off campus transfer students must have a 3.0 University GPA to qualify for the program. 

Advising 

Albers Scholars will have academic advisors in both colleges. Indi\idual interests, directions, needs and transfer credits may change 
the length of time required for completion of the program. 

Seminars and Study Abroad Opportunities 

Anni Albers Scholars will participate in special programs (seminars, lectures, field trips, study abroad classes, etc.) and meet as a 
group for regular discussions and advising. Interdisciplinary seminars led by the College of Design and College of Textiles faculty 
will focus on issues relevant to the nature of the disciplines. 



88 



College of Design 



In addition to the study abroad and internship programs regularly offered by the university, the College of Design, and the College of 
Textiles, every effort will be made to identify opportunities that provide the best fit with each student's academic program and career 
interest. For questions, please contact one of the Program advisers: 



Professor Susan Brandeis 

College of Design, Box 7701 

NC State University Raleigh, NC 27695-7701 

phone: (919)515-3876 

fax:(919)515-7330 

e-mail: susan brandeis(5)ncsu.edu 



Professor Traci May-Plumlee 

College of Textiles, Box 8301 

NC State University Raleigh, NC 27695-8301 

phone: (919)513-4196 

fax:(919)515-3733 

e-mail: traci_may-plumlee@ncsu.edu 




SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

Brooks Hall 

phone: (919)515-8350 

T. Barrie, Director 

J. P. Rand, Associate Director 

Professors: T. Barrie, P. Batchelor, G. Bizios, R. Clark, M. Malecha, W. Place, J. P. 
Rand, H. Sanoff, P. Tesar; Professor Emeritus: R. Bums; Associate Professors: F. 
Harmon, F. Rifki, K. Schaffer, J. Tector; Assistant Professors: G.P. Borden, W. 
Redfield. J. Ficca; Associate Professor Emeritus: D. W. Barnes; Adjunct 
Professors: C. Bishir, D. Dixon, E. Harris, J. Mann, B. Shawcroft; Adjunct 
Associate Professors: S. Cannon, E. Cassily, K. Hobgood, J. Lee, W.H. 
McKinnon, E. Weinstein; Adjunct Assistant Professors: B. Bell, V. Bell, B. 
Dautel, K. Dautel, D.S. Gomes, F. Gomes, D. Griffith, T. Hicks, D. Hill, R. 
Lanou, T. Lineberry, T. Martin, T. McAuliffe, A.M. Taylor. 

In a world of changing conditions- social, cultural, economic and technological- 
the central task of the architect remains to give meaningful form to the physical 
environment. These rapid changes, however, force today's architects to not only 
concern themselves with traditional design issues like shelter, appropriateness, 
comfort, and beauty, but also to address emerging concerns like sustainability, 
environmental conservation, rapidly expanding cities, adaptive uses and 
preservation of older buildings, providing built environments in a global market, 
and new means of producing architecture. The aesthetic revolution of the past few 
decades has also freed architects from the rigidity of earlier theory allowing 
greater diversity and expressiveness in architectural design. 

The School of Architecture has addressed the diversity of roles and responsibilities through its faculty and its curricula. Its 
distinguished faculty embraces a broad definition of the practice of architecture and is, therefore, free of a singular, dogmatic, or 
stylistic bias. This diversity is evident in their experience, area of interest, national origins, and educational backgrounds of the 
faculty. The architecture curriculum balances mathematics, English, natural sciences and humanities are integrated with architectural 
design studios and a rich selection of design support courses. The design studio- a working laboratory in which the student learns 
how to design buildings under the guidance of a professor- is central to the curriculum. 

The undergraduate Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture is a preprofessional degree that stresses the education of the 
individual and serves as the foundation for advanced, professional study in the discipline. The first semester is spent on design 
fundamentals in studio common to all students in the College of Design. Following this introductory experience student receive a 
broad introduction to architectural design, theory, history, technology, and design processes while exploring educational opportunities 
within the university. 

Following the preprofessional program students may continue their studies in either of two professional programs: the one-year, post- 
graduate Bachelor of Architecture or two-year Master of Architecture program (see the Graduate Catalog for information on the latter 
program). Entry into both of these programs is competitive. To be accepted students must demonstrate potential for professional 
accomplishment, capability in design, and satisfy a specific set of professionally-oriented undergraduate requirements. Many 
students spend one or more years gaining professional experience in architecture firms or related fields before pursuing the advanced 
degrees. Educational enrichment is an important characteristic of the architectural program. The College of Design regularly presents 
public lectures by leading professionals and exhibitions of design and artwork. Electives are available in related disciplines- painting, 
sculpture, photography, landscape architecture, industrial design, and graphic design. Also available are field trips to buildings in 
urban centers of architectural interest and a variety of foreign study programs. 

Curricula 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Curriculum in Architecture, Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture 
Curriculum in Architecture- Fifth Year Professional Program, Bachelor of Architecture 



89 



College of Design 



Accreditation 

In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite 
for licensure. The National Architectural Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit US professional degree 
programs in architecture, recognizes two types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture and the Master of Architecture. A program 
may be granted a five-year, three-year, or two-year term of accreditation, depending on its degree of conformance with established 
educational standards. 

Masters degree programs may consist of a preprofessional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree, which, when 
earned sequentially, comprise an accredited professional education. However, the preprofessional degree is not, by itself, recognized 
as an accredited degree. 

The accredited professional degrees at the School of Architecture at North Carolina State University are the Bachelor of Architecture 
and the Master of Architecture degrees. The Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture is the prerequisite preprofessional 
degree for both of the professional degrees. The School of Architecture currently enjoys full NAAB accreditation. 

DEPARTMENT OF ART AND DESIGN 

Leazer Hall 

phone: (919)515-8315 

C. Co.\, Chair 

Professors: S. Brandeis. C. Joyner, M. Pause; Professors Emeriti: CM. McKinney, W. Taylor; Associate Professors: C. Cox, L.M. 
Diaz, P. Fitzgerald, D. Raymond, C. Raub, S. Toplikar; Assistant Professor: V. Plume; Adjunct Associate Professor: K. Rieder; 
Adjunct Assistant Professors: T. Buie, M. Cuales. 

The Art and Design Department awards the Bachelor of Art and Design degree. The pedagogical core of the program aims to 
reinforce the foundation principles of design theory as applied to t\\o-and three-dimensional design. Our curriculum addresses broad 
cultural, ecological, and societal considerations and promotes in our graduates the ability to meet the challenges ol" collaborative 
design. We emphasize the application of creative thinking and problem solving to design projects ranging from single to mass- 
produced artifacts. The areas of application span the range from traditional fine art to interactive media. Examples of current areas of 
study include interactive computer graphics, animation, illustration, sculpture, painting, drawing, fiber, exhibition design, and 
emerging areas in the media arts. 

The Art and Design Department firmly believes there is an essential need for students in the technically-based research university to 
engage in course work that fosters creative thinking. To meet this need, the department otTers courses to non-majors as well as a 
minor in Art and Design, available to majors in any field in the university. Four specific options are currently available: fibers and 
surface design, painting, drawing, and sculpture. 

Opportunities 

Career opportunities for graduates of the Department of Art and Design span the range from traditional fine art to new media 
systems. Graduates of this department are currently working in fields such as advertising, multimedia, illustration, exhibition design, 
textile design, fashion design, art and design education, photography, filmmaking, special etTects, set design, and in all areas of fine 
art. 

Curricula and Degrees 

The Art and Design Department awards the Bachelor of Art and Design degree. The Bachelor of Art and Design degree is a broadly 
based, multidisciplinary undergraduate experience that fully utilizes a diverse faculty and bridges the fine arts and design. Through a 
well-planned sequence of increasingly complex and in-depth studios and close work with faculty, students are able to construct 
optimal learning paths that meet their individual needs. This degree program provides a sound, well-rounded visual arts education 
and focuses on providing students with skills that allow them to perform and succeed in a wide variety of art and design positions 
after graduation. 

While the degree is professionally non-specific, students selecting the Bachelor of Art and Design degree may wish to use it as a 
foundation for later graduate study in a specific art or design discipline. The goal of the Art and Design curriculum is to provide the 
structure for the creation of a new model of art and design professional. These indi\ idual's artistic and practical talents are developed 
as ditTerent expressions of one potentiality. We emphasize proficiency of skills in advanced visualization and interactive media in 
combination with a strong focus on traditional fine arts and design. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Minor in Art and Design (Non-Design Majors) 

The Minor in Art and Design's objectives are to discover basic design principles through hands-on activities, to apply design process 
and theory to solve problems creatively and efficiently, to increase awareness of one's self and environment, and to foster an 
appreciation and understanding of the disciplines of Art and Design. Any curious undergraduate student in the university who is not 
majoring in design and who seeks alternative methods of experiencing the environment in v\ hich we live will benefit from this minor. 

90 



College of Design 



The Minor in Art and Design consists of 15 credit hours of study. A student must successfully complete two prerequisite courses (6 
credit hours approved by the chair of the Art and Design department) before applying for entrance into the Minor in Art and Design. 
These two courses provide an essential foundation in design. A grade point average of 2.75 or above and a faculty review are also 
required. 

After completion of ADN 1 1 1 and 6 credit hours, the student must then complete 9 hours of recommended courses selected from the 
courses listed in the information provided by an Art and Design minor advisor. Six (6) hours must be above the 100 level and another 
three (3) hours at or above the 300 level. A grade of C or better will be required for credit in all courses in the Minor in Art and 
Design program. The course selection will be determined with the guidance of the student's minor adviser and tailored to the needs, 
interests, and goals of the student. 

DEPARTMENT OF GRAPHIC DESIGN 

Brooks Hall 

phone: (919)515-8326 

D. Gonzales Crisp, Chair 

M. Davis, Director of Graduate Programs 

Professors: M. Davis, M. Scotford; Professor Emeritus: A. Lowery; Associate ^fll^lfl "* 

Professors: K. Bailey, D.G. Crisp. S. Townsend; Assistant Professors: P.A. Brock; 
Adjunct Assistant Professors: M. Dillon, S. Donahue, N. Irvine, D. Karam, M. 
Revelle, J. Sueda, W. Temple. 







Graphic design is the process of bringing meaningful visual form to communication. Graphic designers translate communication 
goals through printed, environmental, and electronic presentations of information. Graphic designers use words and images to 
express messages that inform, persuade, and incite people to action. Graphic designers are active in all aspects of communication 
design. For example, they design books, magazines, newspapers, and CD-ROMS for the publishing industry. They also create printed 
materials such as logotypes, symbol, annual reports, newsletters, business forms, stationary systems, and other related literature for 
corporations, institutions, businesses, and governmental agencies. Graphic designers create multimedia presentations, web sites, 
computer interfaces, and motion graphics such as film titling and typographic treatments for video, as well as on-air graphics for 
television. Graphic designers are employed in a variety of settings, including graphic design offices, advertising agencies, 
communication business, as well as corporations, institutions, or governmental agencies as part of internal communications 
departments. 

The Bachelor of Graphic Design is a professional degree recognized by the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) and is 
accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) The program includes the study of visual, theoretical, 
historical, and technical aspects of the discipline. The curriculum provides comprehensive experiences in the analysis of 
communication problems, the development of creative solutions to those problems, and the implementation and evaluation of those 
solutions. Required support courses in typography explore the role of words and language in graphic communication, while courses 
in imaging provide students with experiences in a range of photographic, videographic, and computer media. Instruction in computer 
software programs is fully integrated in design studios and support courses and is not taught as a separate activity. In their studios, 
graphic design majors prepare for careers in the field through the execution of demonstration projects of varying complexity and 
scale. In the last studio, graduating students prepare their portfolios for job searches and demonstrate their expertise in a particular 
area of practice. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 

Brooks Hall 

phone: (919)515-8322 

B. Laffitte, Chair 

P. Hooper, Director of Graduate Programs 

Professors: V.M. Foote, H. Khachatoorian, G. Lewis; Professor Emeritus: A. Cooke; Associate Professors: P. Hooper, B. Laffitte; 
Assistant Professor: B. Jin; Adjunct Assistant Professors: T. Buie, C. Jordan, H. Nickerson, R. Osborne. 

The Department of Industrial Design awards a bachelor degree in Industrial Design. The pedagogical core of the department aims to 
reinforce the foundation principles of design theory as applied to traditional and advanced technologies, i.e. new media, materials, 
and production techniques. Our curriculum addresses broad cultural, technological, and societal considerations and promotes in our 
graduates the ability to meet the challenges of technological complexity through collaborative design. We emphasize the application 
of creative thinking and problem solving to design projects ranging from single to mass-produced artifacts. The areas of application 
span the range fi-om industrial design to interactive multimedia. 

Opportunities 

Career opportunities for graduates of the Department of Industrial Design span the range from industrial design to new media 
systems. Graduates of this department are currently working in fields such as product development, furniture design, recreational 

91 



College of Design 



product design, toy design, exhibition design, textile design, fashion design, photography, fdm making, special effects, set design, 
ergonomics and textile design. 



Curricula and Degrees 

The Department of Industrial Design awards four-year bachelor degrees in Industrial Design. Industrial Design is concerned with all 
human aspects of machine-made products and their relationship to people. The industrial designer is responsible for product safety, 
aesthetics, maintenance, and cost. Industrial designers deal with consumer, and with industrial products. In order to achieve these 
ends, designers must be involved in four major design and research areas: human behavior, human-machine relationships, the 
environment, and the product itself. 

Areas of study in the Bachelor of Industrial Design include furniture, textiles, house wares, appliances, transportation, tools, farm 
equipment, medical instruments, electronics, human-computer interfaces, and recreational support equipment. The goal of the 
Industrial Design curriculum is to teach the design and development of products or systems and their relationship to human beings 
and the environment. 

Graduates of the Bachelor of Industrial Design program have career opportunities in three general types of practice: corporate design 
offices in manufacturing companies, independent consulting offices, and governmental agencies. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Curriculum in Industrial Design, Bachelor of Industrial Design 

DEPARTMENT OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Brooks Hall 

phone: (919)515-8340 

A. Benzinberg-Stein, Chair 

Professors: A.R. Abbate, A. Benzinberg-Stein, R. Moore, A.R. Rice; Professors 
Emeriti: R. Stipe, R.R. Wilkinson; Associate Professors: F. Magallanes, S. Raval; 
Associate Members of the Faculty: H. Devine (Parks Recreation and Tourism 
Management); Research Associate Professor: J. Tomlinson; Adjunct Associate 
Professors: C. Burger, S. Hatchell, M. Jennings, R. Mandell, D. Swanson, W. Swink; 
Teaching Assistant Professor: K. Boone; Adjunct Assistant Professors: K. Friedlien, V. 
George, M. Gruber, J. Sherk. 

The mission of the Department of Landscape Architecture is to nurture and education 
socially and ecologically responsible professionals to serve communities by 
investigating, understanding, creating and celebrating landscapes, through 
interdisciplinary practice, to sustain the cultures and resources of planet Earth. 

Landscape architecture is a multi-faceted profession dedicated to the welfare of the 

physical environment and the living communities of the earth. It is a diverse and 

grow ing design profession that combines art, science, engineering, and technology. 

Landscape Architecture at the College of Design is especially concerned with the 

stewardship, restoration, and regeneration of the natural and cultural environments in 

urban, rural, and wilderness settings. The five-year Bachelor of Landscape 

Architecture degree program provides an educational experience that develops in 

students the skills necessary to deal creatively and responsibly with the human and natural forces that inevitably shape the land. 

The Bachelor of Landscape Architecture program stresses the development of the student's intellectual capacity through the medium 
of a comprehensive design education. The program ofTers an integrated, broad-based education in the discipline of Landscape 
Architecture and it emphasizes interdisciplinary design work, national and international experience, and ecologically sound 
community-based design and planning. Students develop the ability to think, v isualize, analyze, and synthesize ideas using 
information and skills from diverse fields of study. 

This professional degree program fosters the development of an individual's sense of responsibility to society as a steward of the 
cultural and natural environments. Graduates of the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture program have an understanding of the 
profession, its role in society, and their own potential role. Graduates offer employers and clients strong intellectual problem solving 
abilities and the professional skills necessary to evaluate, develop, and communicate solutions to a variety of design and planning 
problems including, but not limited to, the design of parks, trail systems, recreational environments, resorts, urban plazas, 
communities, and conservation plans. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

The Department of Landscape Architecture currently enjoys full Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB) accreditation. 




92 



93 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 




208 Poe Hall 

NCSU Box 7801 

Raleigh, NC 27695-7801 

phone: (919)515-2231 

fax: (919)515-5901 

ced.ncsu.edu 



Kathryn M. Moore, Dean 

Ruie J. Pritchard. Interim Associate Dean. Academic Affairs 

Samuel S. Snyder, Associate Dean, Research and Graduate Studies 

Deborah E. Andrews, Director of Teaching Education Program 

Jo-Ann Robinson, Director of Teaching Fellows Program 

Anona P. Smith-Williams, Assistant Dean. Student Services 

Andy Raynor, Director, Computing and Network Services 

Beth Cassedy, Director, Research Development 

Lisa L. Grable, Director, Learning Technologies Resource Center 



College of Education 



The College of Education, as a technologically advanced, diverse learning community prepares educational professionals, advances 
knowledge through research, and renders service to constituents globally. With emphasis on the preparation of middle grades, high 
school, and post-secondary teachers, counselors, supervisors, and administrators, the college is committed to being a leader and 
innovator in research, application, and dissemination of effective strategies for teaching and learning, especially through technology. 
Composed of the departments of Adult and Community College Education, Educational Research and Leadership and Counselor 
Education, Curriculum and Instruction, and Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education, the college seeks students dedicated 
to the development of all persons and sensitive to the complexity of the teaching/learning process. 

Undergraduate degree programs are offered in education general studies, business and marketing education, mathematics education, 
middle grades education, science education, and technology education. In addition to being admitted to a curriculum, all teacher 
education candidates must meet program requirements for admission to candidacy in teacher education (including a 2.5 or higher 
overall grade point average after the sophomore year) and for admission to student teaching (including a 2.5 or higher GPA overall in 
one's teaching field, and in professional studies.) 

Degree programs lead to a license to teach in technology education or business and marketing education (grades 9-12); and 
mathematics education and science education (grades 9-12). Also offered is an undergraduate degree program in middle grades 
teaching with concentrations either in language arts/social studies or mathematics/science (grades 6-9). 

A program of professional preparation is provided for those students enrolled in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences who 
wish to become teachers of secondary English or social studies (grades 9-12) and teachers of French and Spanish (grades K-12). The 
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Education jointly provide a program to prepare students to become 
agriculture teachers (grades 912). 

Students enrolled in a natural sciences or a mathematical sciences curriculum may double major in the Department of Mathematics, 
Science, and Technology Education and earn a license to teach (6-9 or 9-12). 

Most of the college's teacher education programs are in fields of teacher shortage. Graduates have little difficulty finding teaching 
positions. Because of limited faculty resources, space in some programs is limited. 

Most of the education programs listed in the following pages also offer graduate-level degree programs. In addition, the College of 
Education has graduate programs in: 

Adult and Community College Higher Education 

Counselor Education Middle Grades Education 

Curriculum and Instruction Reading Education 

Educational Administration Special Education 

Educational Research and Policy Analysis Training and Development 
Elementary Education 

See the Graduate Catalog or contact faculty members for information on graduate programs. Public schools post-master's licensure 
programs are available in some curricular areas. 

All of the bachelor's level and graduate level licensure programs are approved by the North Carolina State Board of Education. The 
college is accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Programs (CACREP), and the National Council 
for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). 

The College of Education is located in Poe Hall. It includes a Learning Resources Library, a Learning Technology Resource Center, 
and an Instructional Computing Facility. The building houses laboratories for technology education, reading, science, counseling and 
testing activities. 

Scholarships 

The College of Education has a scholarship program distinct from the campus Merits and Awards Program. Over 20 scholarships are 
awarded to undergraduates each year. Several scholarships are available to encourage students from under-represented populations to 
enroll in the college. 

North Carolina State University is one of 14 institutions participating in the N.C. Teaching Fellows Program and has over 130 
teaching fellows enrolled. Each fellow receives $6,500 per year for four years in exchange for a commitment to teach for four years 
in-state. 

Many students receive awards through the North Carolina State Board of Education's Scholarship Loan Fund for Prospective 
Teachers and through other sources. High school counselors receive information about, and applications for, all of these scholarships 
and awards. 



95 



College of Education 



Honors Programs 

The College of Education has an honors" society in education and technology education. Kappa Delta Pi has a chapter on campus, 
Omicron Rho. It elects those to membership who exhibit the ideals of scholarship, high personal standards, and promise in teaching 
and allied professions. Kappa Delta Pi is an international honor society of, about, and for educators. Selection as a member is based 
on high academic achievement, a commitment to education as a career, and a professional attitude that assures steady growth in the 
profession. 

SAY Village 

The college and University Housing have partnered to provide a residential village housed on the 5th floor of Lee Hall for students 
interested in working with youth. No matter what the major or aspirations for the future, advocating for youth spans many fields of 
study. For more information, visit www.ncsu.edu/housing/communities/say. 

International Activities 

Several faculty members have been involved in overseas projects in China, Ghana, Japan, Peai, Puerto Rico, Russia, and South 
Africa. Some of the foreign language teacher education students spend a year in France or Spain in an exchange program. The 
enrollment of international students in several of the education programs and elsewhere at NC State also otTers on-campus multi- 
cultural opportunities. 

DEPARTMENT OF ADULT AND COMMUNITY COLLEGE EDUCATION 

(See Graduate Catalog) 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH & LEADERSHIP AND 
COUNSELOR EDUCATION 

(See Graduate Catalog) 

DEPARTMENT OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION 

Poe Hall. Room 602 
phone: (919)515-3221 
ced. ncsu.edu/ci 

E. S. Vasu. Department Head 

S. S. Osborne, Director of Graduate Education 

Professors: C.L. Crossland, D.A. Cullinan, B.J. Fox. T.P. O'Brien. C.A. Pope. R.J. Pritchard. H.A. Spires. E.S. Vasu; Associate 
Professors: M. Alibrandi. CM. Beal. P.L. Marshall, S.S. Osborne, A.J. Reiman. E.J. Sabomie; Assistant Professors: J.T. DeCuir, 
A.D. Dixson, A. Foley. J.L. Nietfeld. W. O'Steen. J. Osborne. J. Steelman; Visiting Assistant Professors: L.E. Huffman: Adjunct 
Professors: D.D. Copeland, R.A. Edelfelt; Adjunct Assistant Professors: S.B. Buckner, L.L. Grable; C.J. Messina, W.R. Parker; 
Professor Emeritus: B.M. Parramore, B.R. Poulton; Associate Professor Emeritus: L. Thies-Sprinthall. 

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction prepares undergraduate students to become teachers of middle grades language arts 
and social studies, and secondary business and marketing education. The Department currently includes a diversity of highly 
qualified students. All programs emphasize scholarship and individually designed study, and include cross-disciplinary work and 
field-based experiences. 

CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS AND MARKETING EDUCATION 

Poe Hall. Room 402 
phone: (919)515-1743 

T. O'Brien. Coordinator 

The Business and Marketing Education curriculum is specifically designed to prepare teachers for Business and Marketing Education 
programs in secondary schools. In addition, it provides the necessary pedagogical and technical preparation needed by business and 
marketing instructors in community and technical colleges, as well as for selected training and development roles in business and 
industry. The combination of a broad general and professional education, business and marketing courses, and supervised work 
experience in marketing occupations provides a unique preparation for educators in a rapidly expanding professional field. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Curriculum in Marketing Education. B.S. in Marketing Education 



96 



College of Education 



CURRICULA IN MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION 

Middle Grades Education, Language Arts and Social Studies Concentration 

Poe Hall, Room 402 
phone: (919)515-6231 
C. Beal, Coordinator 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg records/curricula 
Middle Grades Education, Language Arts/Social Studies Concentration 

For Middle Grades Education, Mathematics/Science Concentration, see the Department of Mathematics. Science, and Technology 
Education. 

CURRICULA IN EDUCATION, GENERAL STUDIES 

Poe Hall, Room 502L 
phone: (919)515-1749 

J. R. Kolb, Coordinator of Advising 

The General Studies Education program has two areas of emphasis. Emphasis A serves those students who are interested in those 
fields of education that do not require formal licensure, such as juvenile homes, day care, and other public and private agencies. 
Emphasis B serves those students previously enrolled in teacher education programs at North Carolina State University, but whose 
career goals have changed. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Emphasis A 
Emphasis B 

ENGLISH TEACHER EDUCATION 

Tompkins Hall, Room 268 
phone: (919)515-4167 

Barbara Bennett, Coordinator of Advising 

Students desiring to become secondary English teachers in grades 9-12 will be enrolled in the College of Humanities and Social 
Sciences. In that College's section of this catalog, curriculum requirements for the teacher education option can be found under the 
Department of English. Students desiring to become language arts teachers in grades 6-9 will be enrolled in the College of Education. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

FRENCH TEACHER EDUCATION 

1911 Building, Room 126 
phone: (919)515-9293 

Diane Adier, Coordinator of Advising 

Students desiring to become teachers of French will be enrolled in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. In that College's 
section of this catalog, curriculum requirements for the teacher education option in French can be found under Foreign Languages 
and Literatures. See the following web site for more information: sasw.chass.ncsu.edu/fl/ 

SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHER EDUCATION 

Poe Hall, Room 528 
phone: (919)515-9655 

K. A. Troost, Coordinator of Advising, Sociology 
G. Surh, Coordinator of Advising, History 
K. Vickery, Coordinator of Advising, History 
S. Carey, Coordinator of Advising, Political Science 

Students desiring to become secondary social studies teachers in grades 9-12 will be enrolled in the College of Humanities and Social 
Sciences. Curriculum requirements for the teacher education options can be found under history, political science and public 
administration, and sociology and anthropology in that College's section. Students desiring to become social studies teachers in 
grades 6-9 will be enrolled in the College of Education. For details, consult the Middle Grades Education description. 



97 



College of Education 



SPANISH TEACHER EDUCATION 

1911 Building. Room 142 
phone: (919)515-9288 

Susan Navey-Davis, Coordinator of Advising 

Students desiring to become teachers of Spanish will be enrolled in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. The curriculum 
requirements for the teacher education option in Spanish can be found under Foreign Languages and Literatures in the College of 
Humanities and Social Sciences section. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 

Poe Hall, Room 326 
phone: (919)515-2238 
ced.ncsu.edu/mste 

J. E. Penick, Head Alice Y. Scales, Assistant Head 

J, R. Kolb. Director of Graduate Programs for Mathematics Education 

J. C. Park. Director of Graduate Programs for Science Education 

W. W. Deluca, Director of Graduate Programs for Technology Education 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: J.R. Kolb, J.C. Park, L.V. Stiff, L.W. Watson; Professors: L.M. Clark, G. Jones. J.R. 
Kolb; Professors Emeriti: D.A. Adams, N.D. Anderson, A. Howe, H.E. Speece; Associate Professors: G.S. Carter. V.W. DeLuca, W.J. 
Haynie III. K.S. Norwood, J.C. Park, R.E. Peterson, R. Tzur. W.M. Waters, Jr., L.W. Watson, R.E. Wenig, J.H. Wheatlcy; Research 
Associate Professor: H.S. Stubbs; Assistant Professors: L.A. Annetta, T.J. Branoff, A. Clark. K. Flanagan, K. Hollebrands, W. Kelly, 
E. Parsons, A.Y. Scales, E.N. Wiebe; Assistant Professor Emeritus: J.L. Crow, W.J. Vanderwall; Instructors: B. Matthews; Clinical 
Instructor: E. Williams. Lecturer: J.F. Freeman; Lecturers Emeriti: GK. Hillard, B.D. Webb. 

The Department of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education prepares undergraduate students to become teachers of 
mathematics, science and technology. The department traditionally prepares competent professionals who ha\e strong subject matter 
backgrounds and pedagogical skills. Departmental majors may seek licensure for teaching high school grades 9-12 or middle grades 
6-9. Students in the high school curriculum in mathematics or science education take approximately 45 percent of their program in 
science and mathematics and may complete a double major, receiving a second degree in mathematics or one of the sciences. 
Students in Technology Education may be licensed as teachers of technology programs in middle grades and high schools. 7-12. All 
pre-service teaching programs provide a broad background; an in-depth study in mathematics, technology or an area of science; and 
the development of professional competencies. In addition, the technology education curriculum provides a non-teaching option with 
a general background for a variety of employment opportunities in business and industry. A minor in Technology Education is 
available. 

The department also offers a minor in Graphic Communications in which the student develops proficiency in applying graphic 
techniques in both career and leisure activities. 

Scholarships and Awards 

The Speece Scholarship is awarded to as many as three outstanding juniors or seniors either in mathematics education or science 
education. The department sponsors two undergraduate organizations: the Mathematics and Science Education Club and the 
Technology Education Collegiate Association. Annual awards are given to the outstanding seniors in Mathematics Education (9-12), 
Science Education (9-12), Technology Education (7-12), and Middle Grades Education (6-9) in mathematics and in .science. 
Technology education students are eligible for the Epsilon Pi Tau Leadership Award. 

CURRICULA IN MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION (GRADES 6-9 LICENSURE) 
Middle Grades Education, Mathematics (with Science) Concentration 

Poe Hall. Room 510E 
phone: (919)515-6907 

N. S. Norwood, Coordinator of Advising 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg records/curricula 

Middle Grades Education, Mathematics/Science Concentration 

Poe Hall, Room 31 5B 
phone: (919)515-6920 

G. S. Carter. Coordinator of Advising 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

98 



99 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 




118 & 120 Page Hall 

NCSU Box 7904 

Raleigh, NC 27695-7904 

phone: (919)515-2315 

fax: (919)515-8702 

e-mail: engineering@ncsu.edu 

www.engr.ncsu.edu 



Nino A. Masnari, Dean 

Richard F. Keltic, Associate Dean, Academic AtTairs 

Sarah A. Rajala. Associate Dean, Research and Graduate Programs 

Thomas K. Miller, Associate Dean, Distance Education and Information Technology 

John Strenkowski. Assistant Dean. Research Programs 

Tony L. Mitchell. Assistant Dean. Engineering Student Services 

Jerome P. Lavelle. Assistant Dean. Academic Affairs 



College of Engineering 



Men and women who seek a challenging technical career in research and development, design, construction, production, 
maintenance, technical sales, management, teaching, or other careers requiring a methodical, creative solution of problems, should 
consider an engineering or computer science education. At NC State, the College of Engineering has a distinguished and 
internationally recognized faculty. The faculty, together with the curricula of the undergraduate and graduate programs, offer an 
opportunity for ambitious men and women to become the leaders and prime movers of our increasingly technological world. Because 
of the great influence of science and technology on our everyday lives, today's engineers and computer scientists must be acutely 
aware of, and responsible for, the impact that their creations may have on society. In addition to safety, aesthetics, economics, and 
energy, today's technologist must consider environmental, sociological, and other "human concern" costs. 

The college's graduates may be found in widely diversified careers throughout the world. Most are practicing in the engineering 
profession, but because their education has equipped them well to deal with problems in a wide variety of fields, many College of 
Engineering graduate have become corporate presidents, leaders in government, lawyers, and medical doctors, to name a few. The 
College of Engineering is organized into twelve departments. Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, 
Chemical Engineering, Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical and Computer 
Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Nuclear 
Engineering, Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science and Wood and Paper Science. Seventeen undergraduate degree programs 
are offered in these twelve departments. In addition, a degree program in Engineering is offered by special arrangement to the very 
few students who can clearly demonstrate the need for an individualized program of study. All departments also offer advanced 
studies leading to master's degrees and the Doctor of Philosophy degree. (Consult the Graduate Catalog for graduate degrees). 

The College of Engineering requests and receives accreditation from the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accrediting 
Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) for fifteen of its undergraduate engineering degree programs. These are aerospace 
engineering, biological engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computer engineering, electrical engineering, 
environmental engineering, industrial engineering, industrial engineering-furniture manufacturing, materials science and 
engineering, mechanical engineering, nuclear engineering, and textile engineering. The two newest programs in the college. 
Biomedical Engineering and Paper Science and Engineering are seeking accreditation this year. Accreditation ensures that these 
programs satisfy requirements for acceptance by these nationally recognized agencies. All curricula and programs are designed to 
maintain the college's national and international reputation while meeting the needs of the people and industries of the state and 
region through effective instruction, competent research, and the development of new and meaningfijl contributions to scientific 
knowledge. 

The Career Planning and Placement Center is maintained by the university to assist continuing students and graduating students in 
achieving their career goals. 

Degrees 

Entering students receive assistance in planning an appropriate program of study and have available continued guidance from 
academic advisers throughout their academic careers. Beginning freshmen enroll in the First Year Engineering Program for one to 
two years. After successftilly completing matriculation requirements, students may be admitted to a departmental Degree Program. In 
order to be eligible to apply for admission into a degree program, unmatriculated students must successfully complete the following 
courses: MA 141 and MA 241; PY 205; ENG 101; CH 101, 102(lab); E 101 and a satisfactory grade in E 115. In addition, students 
must have achieved a total GPA of 2.9 within the first 60 hours of enrollment at NC State. 

Bachelor of Science: The baccalaureate program provides preparation for entry into industry, government, business or private 
practice as well as graduate school. Graduates with a B.S. degree in engineering or computer science may be engaged in design 
development, production, construction, sales, maintenance, or the planning, operation or management of industrial units. 

The undergraduate curricula offer programs of study leading to bachelor's degrees in aerospace engineering, biological engineering, 
biomedical engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, construction management, computer engineering, computer 
science, electrical engineering, environmental engineering, industrial engineering, industrial engineering-furniture manufacturing 
option, materials science and engineering, mechanical engineering, nuclear engineering, paper science and engineering, and textile 
engineering. Graduation requirements include completion of one of the seventeen curricula with an overall grade point average of 2.0 
and a grade point average of 2.0 in the major courses. The total number of required credits ranges from 120 to 128 semester hours. 

Double Degree Programs 

NC State students may wish to earn Bachelor of Science degrees in two fields from the College of Engineering. When the two 
courses of study are planned early and carefully, a number of courses can simultaneously satisfy requirements in both degrees. 
Humanities, social science, physics, mathematics, chemistry, English, and physical education sequences are common to most 
curricula. Students interested in such a program should consult the Office of Academic Affairs (118 Page Hall). 

Other students may wish to combine a Bachelor of Science in engineering or computer science with a Bachelor of Science or 
Bachelor of Arts degree in another college or school at NC State University. Here also, a number of courses required for one degree 
may also satisfy requirements for a second degree. When the two courses of study are planned early and carefully, a double-degree 
program can be completed in as few as five years. Students interested in such a program should contact the Office of Academic 
Affairs. 



101 



College of Engineering 



Student Activities 

Each curriculum in the College of Engineering has a technical society open to every student enrolled in the curriculum. In most cases, 
these are student chapters of national professional organizations. Each curriculum also has one or more honor societies to give 
recognition to students who have earned superior academic records. In addition, there are college-wide honor, professional, and 
service societies that offer personally and educationally rewarding opportunities for students. 

Student representatives may serve on the Engineer's Council. The Council is the coordinating agency for college-wide activities such 
as the Engineers' Week, the Annual Engineering Career Fair, and the Senior Awards Banquet. 

Humanities and Social Sciences 

Each student in the College of Engineering is required to take a minimum of 21 credit hours of humanities and social science courses. 
At least one course used to fulfill the requirements must be selected from the list of courses which focus on a non-English speaking 
culture. All of the courses used to satisfy the humanities and social science requirement must be taken from the College of 
Engineering list of approved courses and all must be completed with regular grading. 

Cooperative Education Program 

This optional program is structured so that the student will alternate semesters of study with semesters of practical work as 
sophomores and juniors. The freshman and senior years are spent on campus, while sophomore and junior academic work is spread 
over a three-year period to permit alternating academic semesters with work-experience semesters. Students earn a salary while they 
are in industry, and they may earn a sufficient income to finance much of their college education. The co-op plan can be completed in 
five years, during which time the student receives 12 to 18 months of industrial experience. 

Students in all curricula in the College of Engineering may apply for the co-op program if they have a grade point average of 2.25 or 
better. Application for admission into the co-op program should be made early in the Spring Semester of the freshman year, however, 
later applications resulting in fewer work semesters prior to graduation will be considered during the sophomore year or the first 
semester of the junior year. Students must be admitted into an engineering degree program prior to beginning the first co-op 
assignment. Further information may be obtained from the Office of Cooperative Education, 300 Clark Hall. 

Benjamin Franklin Scholars Program 

A limited number of freshmen in the College of Engineering are selected to participate in the Benjamin Franklin Scholars program. 
In addition to their major courses, each Benjamin Franklin Scholar develops an individualized, five-year plan of work focused on a 
central theme in the humanities and social sciences. Students completing the program receive a Bachelor of Science in an engineering 
discipline or computer science and a bachelor's degree in multidisciplinary studies. 

This double-degree program provides a unique opportunity to integrate a solid base of knowledge in technology or science with a 
broad philosophical perspective of the humanities. The curriculum for the double-degree program has four main components: ( 1) a 
strong general education, (2) specifically designed interdisciplinary and problem-defining courses, (3) all technical course 
requirements associated with the engineering or computer science degree, and (4) a thirty-hour multidisciplinary concentration 
designed by students in consultation w ith their advisors. With careful planning, this program can be completed in five years. 

For more information, contact Dr. Joseph Herkert, Department of Multidisciplinary Studies. 

Computers 

During their first semester, new freshmen in the College enroll in a computer literacy course, E 1 15, which is taught using the Eos 
student computing facility. Following completion of E 1 15, it is expected that students will incorporate the use of Eos workstations 
into all curricular areas, including the preparation of reports and papers in non-technical subjects. In either the freshman or 
sophomore year, most students will complete a course in computer programming and, thereafter, will increasingly use computers as 
an engineering tool. The college policy is that all of its students will be provided with the computing resources required to 
successfully complete their course of study. However, some students may find that owning a computer is beneficial in temis of 
convenience and ready access to computational capability. 

International Opportunities 

The college is actively working to provide its students with opportunities for overseas study experience. In addition to the Study 
Abroad Program, which is available to all students at NCSU, College of Engineering students can participate in an exchange program 
with Compe'gne, France; Rostock, Germany; Sergovia, Spain; among others. 

Transfer Program 

Students with non-engineering degrees or one or more years of academic work completed at other institutions may apply for transfer 
admission to the College of Engineering through the University Admissions Office. Students are admitted from appropriate programs 
from four-year institutions, as well as junior and community colleges. 

Students currently attending or anticipating attendance at other institutions are advised to contact the Office of Academic Affairs for 
information regarding admission to NC State and credit for courses taken elsewhere. 

102 



College of Engineering 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

David S. Weaver Laboratories, Room 100 
phone: (919)515-2694 
www.bae.ncsu.edu 

(Also see Agriculture and Life Sciences) 

J. H. Young, Head 

R. O. Evans, Jr., Department Extension Leader 

S. A. Hale, Undergraduate Coordinator 

Distinguished University Professor and William Neal Reynolds Professor: R.W. Skaggs; Professors: C.F. Abrams, Jr., D.B. Beasley, 
C.J. Bowers, Jr., M.D. Boyette, R.O. Evans, Jr., F.J. Humenik, G.D. Jennings, T.M. Losordo, J.E. Parsons, R.P Rohrbach, A.R. 
Rubin, R.S. Sowell, J. Spooner (Extension), L.F. Stikeleathers, RW. Westennan, T.B. Whitaker (USDA), D.H. Willits, J.H. Young; 
Adjunct Professors: L.M. Safley, Jr., S.S. Schiffman, L.F. Sykes; Professors Emeriti: J.C. Barker, G.B. Blum, Jr., J.W. Dickens, L.B. 
Driggers, J.M. Fore, G.W. Giles, E.G. Humphries, W.H. Johnson, G.J. Kriz, W.F. McClure, F.M. Richardson, R.E. Sneed, C.W. Suggs, 
R.W. Watkins, E.H. Wiser; Associate Professors: G.R. Baughman, J.J. Classen, S.A. Hale, R.L. Huffman, G.T. Roberson; Assistant 
Professors: M. Chinn, J. Cheng, S. Shah, R. Sharma; Research Assistant Professors: G.M. Chescheir; Extension Assistant Professor: 
M.R Burchell, G.L. Grabow, W.F Hunt, 111; Adjunct Assistant Professors: D.M. Amatya, S.K. Seymour; Extension Specialists: D.E. 
Line, J.M. Rice, R.L. Sherman; Associate Members of the Faculty: C.R. Daubert (Food Science), B.E. Farkas (Food Science), A.E. 
Hassan (Forestry), K.M. Keener (Food Science), S.C. Roe (Companion Animal & Special Species Medicine), K.P. Sandeep (Food 
Science), K.R. Swartzel (Food Science). 

The Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering offers a four-year undergraduate program in Biological Engineering 
(BE). The BE curriculum includes concentrations in agricultural engineering, bioprocess engmeering, and environmental 
engineering. All concentrations emphasize basic science and engineering courses that provide a sound background for application of 
engineering principles to biological and agricultural problems. 

Opportunities 

Students learn to solve a wide variety of engineering problems and will have opportunities for specialization. Scientific and 
engineering principles are applied: to analyze, understand and utilize mechanical properties of biological materials; to the 
conservation and management of soil and water resources; to the design of sensor-based instrumentation and control systems for 
biological and agricultural applications; to the design and development of machinery systems for all phases of agricultural and food 
production; to the design of structures and environmental control systems for housing animals, plant growth, and biological product 
storage; to the design and evaluation of ergonomic devices for human and animal applications; and to the development of improved 
systems for processing and marketing food and agricultural products. 

Graduates of the BE curriculum receive a "B.S. in Biological Engineering," qualifying them for positions in design, development, 
and research in both industry and public institutions. The curriculum also prepares students for post-graduate work leading to 
advanced degrees. Some positions filled by recent BE graduates include: product design; development and testing; plant engineering 
and management; engineering analysis and inspection for federal and state agencies; engineering consultant and research. Entry-level 
salary ranges for BE graduates are similar to those of Civil, Industrial, and Mechanical Engineering graduates. 

Curricula 

The BE curriculum is jointly administered by the College of Engineering and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and 
combines the fields of engineering, biology and agriculture. The BE curriculum is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation 
Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 1 1 1 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 
- phone; (410)347-7700. Graduates are qualified to become registered professional engineers by passing the appropriate 
examinations and upon completing the engineering experience requirements. 

The educational objectives of the Biological Engineering (BE) Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree are to: 

Educate students for successful careers in engineering by mastering the fundamentals of engineering and biology. 

• Instill in the students time management skills and a sense of confidence in their ability to grasp and apply engineering principles 
to solve complex, real-world problems. 

Impart a sense of professional responsibility and work ethic. 

• Establish an educational environment in which students participate in inter-disciplinary activities. 

• Offer a curriculum that provides students an opportunity to become broadly educated engineers and life-long learners. 
Expose students to advances in engineering practice and research. 

• Recruit students with high potential who will combine to the fiiture economic and social well-being of North Carolina. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Curriculum in Biological Engineering 

Curriculum in Biological Engineering - Agricultural Engineering Concentration 
Curriculum in Biological Engineering - Bioprocessing Engineering Concentration 
Curriculum in Biological Engineering - Environmental Engineering Concentration 

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JOINT DEPARTMENT OF BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING 

432 Daniels Hall 
phone: (919)515-3578 
www.bme.ncsu.edu 

H. T. Nagle. Founding Chair 

S. M. Blanchard, Interim Associate Head and Director of Undergraduate Programs 

Professors: C.F. Abrams, Jr., S.M. Blanchard, H. Hsaid, C. Lucas, C. Kleinstreuer, H.T. Nagle; Associate Professors: E. Grant, J. 
Johnson, S. Knisley, M.G. McCord; Assistant Professors: D.S. Lalush, E.G. Loboa, J. MacDonald, P.L. Mente. 

Biomedical engineering is a profession that develops and applies engineering knowledge and experience to solve problems in biology 
and medicine and to enhance health care. Biomedical engineers are professionally trained to combine the rigors of medical and 
biological studies with the power of engineering analysis and design. People become biomedical engineers to be of service to others, 
to enjoy the excitement of understanding living systems, and to use state-of-the-art science and technology to solve the complex 
problems of medical care. The emphasis in biomedical engineering is on finding solutions by researching, testing, and applying 
medical, biological, chemical, electrical, and materials infonnation. Biomedical engineers are unique individuals who make 
contributions to health care that are both satisfying to themselves and beneficial to others. 

Opportunities 

Biomedical engineers are employed by hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, medical device and testing companies, government 
agencies, universities, and medical schools. With so many areas of specialization within the field, graduates are encouraged to further 
their education by attending graduate or professional school after graduation from NC State. Graduates from this program have 
attended graduate programs in biomedical engineering, physical therapy, mechanical engineering, industrial engineering, 
microbiology, virology, public health, and sports physiology at many diflerent institutions. Graduates who have taken additional 
courses to satisfy entrance requirements have also been accepted by medical, dental and pharmacy schools. 

Curriculum 

The department offers the Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering. The objectives of the curriculum are 

1 . To educate students to be successful in biomedical engineering by emphasizing engineering and biology as related to basic 
medical sciences and human health, 

2. To produce biomedical engineers able to communicate effectively with diverse audiences and prepared to work in 
multidisciplinary teams, 

3. To develop in students professional, ethical, and societal responsibility in biomedical engineering practices, and 

4. To expose students to advances in biomedical engineering practice and research and to instill in them a life-long thirst for 
knowledge. 

Novel aspects of the undergraduate program include capstone engineering design projects that combine real world engineering design 
and community outreach, opportimities to apply for industrial internships after completing junior-level engineering courses, 
continuous and caring faculty advising, student involvement in program evaluation and improvements, and engineering 
specialization in one of three areas: Biomechanics, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, or Biomedical Instrumentation. Computers 
are used throughout the program. Graduates will be prepared for professional employment in research, design, development, and 
sales in government or industry and for graduate and professional education in engineering and the life sciences. The program is 
jointly administered by the College of Engineering and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. First year students interested in 
this curriculum should enroll in the College of Engineering undesignated program and indicate BMU as their curriculum choice. 

The current specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Scholarships 

Students in this degree program are eligible for scholarships from the College of Engineering and the College of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences. 

Facilities 

Teaching facilities are located in the David S. Weaver Laboratories on the central campus. These facilities include state-of-the-art 
classroom and laboratory facilities, study space, and convenient access to computing resources. Faculty offices are located in Daniels 
Hall, Weaver Laboratories, the College of Textiles, and various other academic areas on campus. Contact offices for advising are 
maintained in Daniels Hall and in Weaver Laboratories. Extensive Internet and video-conferencing capabilities are deployed to 
facilitate convenient faculty-student contact. 

Research facilities are located in Weaver Laboratories, Daniels Hall, and the College of Textiles as well as in the laboratories of many 
other faculty from throughout the university who do research in biomedical engineering areas. Facilities include access to advanced 
materials testing instrumentation, imaging resources, rapid prototyping facilities, biomedical instrumentation, and clinical resources. 

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DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Riddick Engineering Laboratories, Room 113 
phone: (919)515-2324 

R K. Kilpatrick, Head 

R S. Fedkiw, Associate Head 

S. A. Khan, Director of Graduate Programs 

L. G. Bullard, Director of Undergraduate Studies 

Frank Hawkins Kenan Distinguished Professor: R.G Carbonell; Distinguished University Professors: D.R Ollis, K.E. Gubbins; 
Alcoa Professors: C.K. Hall, R.M. Kelly; Camiile Dreyfus Professor: H.B. Hopfenberg; H. Clark; Hoechst-Celanese Professors: R.G. 
Carbonell. R.M. Felder; Professors: R.G. Carbonell, J.M. DeSimone, PS. Fedkiw, K.E. Gubbins, C.K. Hall, R.M. Kelly, S.A. Kahn, 
RK. Kilpatrick, RK. Lim, D.R Ollis, M.R. Overcash, G.N. Parsons, GW. Roberts, R.J. Spontak; Adjunct Professors: A.L. Andrady, 
M.L. Balmer-Miller, G.K. Fleming, D.J. Hammond, D.J. Kiserow, J.B. McClain, 1. Pinnau, C. Quah, K.L. Roberts, M. Sliwinskia- 
Bartowiak, J.J. Spivey, A.H. Weher, R.F. Weimer, S. White, P. Vlcek; Professors Emeriti: K.J. Bachman, K.O. Beatty, R.M. Felder, 
H.B. Hopfenberg, C.J. Setzer, H. Winston; Associate Professors: C.R. Daubert, C.S. Grant, H.H. Lamb, S.W. Peretti; Assistant 
Professors: J. Genzer, J.M. Haugh, J. Van Zanten, O. Veler. 

The sound management of material, environmental, and energy resources, taking into account natural economic constraints, guides 
the performance of chemical engineering practice. Chemical engineering education integrates design and analysis, science and 
technology, with communication skills developed through exposure to the humanities and the social and economic sciences. 
Chemical engineering organizes these diverse skills into a coherent discipline uniquely suited to the needs of the chemical, 
biochemical, environmental, petroleum, plastics, textile, and pulp and paper industries. 

Facilities 

Departmental teaching and research activities are based on the four floors comprising the east wing of the Riddick Engineering 
Laboratories. Equipment for studying the principles of fluid flow, heat transfer, distillation, absorption, and drying is maintained in 
several laboratories. Chemical reaction kinetics, including heterogeneous catalysis and polymerization, are studied on specially 
designed equipment. Extensive apparatus is available for characterizing the relationships between molecular structure and bulk 
properties of polymers. A 2,000 square foot biotechnology laboratory has been equipped to include a pilot plan for studying 
biologically-mediated chemical reactions. Specialized digital computational equipment complements campus-wide university 
computer resources. The department makes constant use of the College of Engineering Eos computer system that is accessible for use 
24 hours a day by students and faculty. 

Opportunities 

Graduates find employment at attractive salaries in diverse subdisciplines including research and development, production, 
management and administration; process control, technical service, and sales; estimation and specification writing; consulting and 
teaching. Students desiring careers in teaching, research, or consulting are advised to consider graduate training (consult the Graduate 
Catalog). Chemical engineering graduates often pursue careers in law or the medical sciences since the broadly structures 
undergraduate curriculum provides strong preparation for graduate study in a wide range of professional specialties. 

Minor in Chemical Engineering 

In addition to B.S. graduates of the chemical engineering program at NC State, there is a pool of students in other disciplines whose 
professional work assignments may require a knowledge of chemical engineering nomenclatures, technologies and methods. The 
minor in chemical engineering is intended to allow such students to develop an understanding of the fundamental concepts and 
practice of chemical engineering. This minor should be most attractive to undergraduate students in environmental engineering, pulp 
and paper technology, and chemistry, and it will allow non-chemical engineering majors to prepare themselves for graduate study in 
chemical engineering with a minimum amount of prerequisite work following their acceptance into the graduate program. 

Students enrolled in the minor in chemical engineering must complete CHE 205, CHE 225, CHE 311, CHE 315, CHE 316, and CHE 
446. All the courses must be completed with a grade of "C-"' or higher. An application for the minor must be submitted to the 
Coordinator of Advising in the Department of Chemical Engineering. Admission to the minor will require a minimum 2.5 over-all 
grade point average at NC State, and a grade of "B-" or higher on the first enrollment in CHE 205. 

Curricula 

The successful practice of chemical engineering requires a broad, diversified preparation. The spirit of research and experimental 
inquiry is vital; students, therefore, require sound scientific backgrounds essential to original and disciplined though, enthusiastic 
inquiry and, ultimately, original and constructive accomplishment. The undergraduate curriculum emphasizes the scientific, 
engineering, and economic principles involved in the design and operation of chemical processes. 

Design methodologies are practiced in all core chemical engineering courses. This integrated design experience culminates with the 
senior design sequence, CHE 450 and CHE 451. The background in organic, physical, and inorganic chemistry is comparable to the 
training offered to chemistry majors. Mathematics, physical sciences, and distributed humanities courses are also required. The 
chemical engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology, 1 1 1 Market Place, Suite 1 050, Baltimore, MD, 2 1 202-40 1 2; phone: (4 1 0)34 1 -7700. 

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Specific curriculum requirements are available online: wvvw.ncsu.edu/regrecords/curricula 

Curriculum in Chemical Engineering, Bachelor of Science 

Curriculum in Chemical Engineering, Biosciences Option 

Curriculum in Chemical Engineering, Electronic Materials Concentration 

Curriculum in Chemical Engineering. Pollution Prevention Concentration 

Curriculum in Chemical Engineering, Polymer Science Concentration 

Curriculum in Chemical Engineering, Honors Program 

Program Educational Objectives 

Our department's mission is to excel in teaching and research within the discipline of chemical engineering. To accomplish this, we 
are committed to the following educational objectives: 

To educate students to apply a strong core of knowledge and practice that represents chemical engineering, engineering science, 

and analytical problem solving. 

To encourage our students to enhance their educational experience by offering in a series of advanced chemical engineering 

topics including honors programs, CHE options, and classes. 

To prepare students with professional skills to convert knowledge into the implementation of ideas, often leading to success in 

new ventures. 

To commit faculty time and resources to providing our sUidents with a comprehensive, quality education 

Biomolecular Concentration in Chemical Engineering 

By enhanced exposure to the biological sciences, the biomolecular concentration enables the student to develop insight into 
biological systems and processes. 

Nanoscience Concentration in Chemical Engineering 

The nanoscience concentration in chemical engineering allows the student to develop an understanding of the understanding of the 
scientific and technological principles associated with the design and manufacture of patterns and devices with features and advanced 
functionality on the nanometer scale. 

Green Chemistry & Engineering Concentration in Chemical Engineering 

The nanoscience concentration in chernical engineering introduces students to the design of chemical products and processes that 
reduce or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances. 

Honors Program in Chemical Engineering 

The honors program allows talented students to gain a deeper understanding of chemical engineering principles than would be 
acquired by completing the standard CHE curriculum Admission to the program requires students to have earned a minimum overall 
GPA of 3.5 and a minimum GPA of 3.5 in CHE 205 and CHE 225. An honors thesis is required for completion of the honors 
program. 

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Mann Hall, Room 203 
phone: (919)515-233 
www.ce.nscu.edu 

E. Downey Brill, Jr., Head 

D. W. Johnston, Associate Head for Graduate Programs 
M. A. Bariaz, Associate Head for Undergraduate Programs 
D. W. Parish, Coordinator of Advising 

Distinguished Professor of Civil Engineering and Construction: S. Rizkalla; Professors: M.A. Bariaz, J.W. Baugh. Jr.. E.D. Brill, Jr.. 
R.C. Border. R.H. Borden. J.S. Fisher, M.A. Gabr, A.K. Gupta, D.W. Johnston, N.R Khosla. Y.R. Kim. H.R. Malcom. V.C. Matzen 
(Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor), A Mirmiran, J.M. Nau (Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor), W.J. 
Rasdorf N.M. Rouphail; Adjunct Professor: K.H. Reckhow: Distinguished University Professor Emeritus: J.M. Hanson, RH. 
McDonald, RZ. Zia; Professors Emeriti: M. Amein, RD. Cribbins. R.A. Douglas, J.R Ely, K.S. Havner, C.L. Heimbach. Y. Horie, 
S.W. Nunnally. C.C. Tung, H.E. Wahls; Associate Professors: L.E. Bemold, A.C. Chao, H.C. Prey, T. Hassan, J.E. Hummer, D.R.U. 
Knappe, M.L. Leming, M.F. Overton, M.S. Rahman. S.R. Ranjithan, J.R. Stone, A. A. Tayebali: Adjunct Associate Professors: L.R. 
Goode, RC. Lambe. D.R. van der Vaart: Associate Professors Emeriti: W.L. Bingham, E.D. Gurley. J.C Smith; Assistant Professors: 
RL. de los Reyes. J.J. Ducoste, M.N. Guddatie, A. Gupta, M.J. Kowalsky. D.R Laefer. G. Mahinthakumar. B.M. Williams; Research 
Assistant Professor: D.H. Loughlin; Lecturer: R.A. Nunez, E.C. Weaver; Instructor: E.A. Sumner; Adjunct Assistant Professor: J.D. 
Bowen. J.C. Brantly; Adjunct Lecturers: B.A. Doll, B. Koehler, D.J. Lombardi; Interinstitutional Adjunct Faculty: J.S. Wu, L.E. 
King, R.A. Luettich, S.M. Rogers, Jr. 

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The Department of Civil Engineering offers several degree programs concerned with the improvement and care of both public and 
private infrastructure and natural environments. The degree programs address the planning, design, construction, operation, and 
maintenance of buildings, dams, bridges, harbors, power facilities, pollution control facilities, water supply and transportation 
systems. The curricula provide academic preparation for students considering careers in civil, construction, or environmental 
engineering. 

The department offers undergraduate degree programs leading to the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, the Bachelor of 
Science in Construction Engineering and Management, and the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering. All three 
programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 
(ABET), 1 1 1 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD, 21202-4012; phone: (410)347-7700. Graduation from an ABET accredited 
engineering degree is the first step toward registration as a Professional Engineer. All three programs also prepare students for 
graduate education. 

Opportunities 

People will always need constructed facilities to live, work, and sustain their lives and environment, and civil, construction, and 
environmental engineers will always be needed to plan, design, and construct these facilities. Civil, construction, and environmental 
engineering comprises such a diversified field that graduates have a wide choice in locations and type of employment. Jobs range 
from federal, state, or municipal agencies to a variety of manufacturing and processing industries, consulting firms or construction 
companies. The work may be performed partially or wholly in an office or in the field and may be located in a small community, a big 
city, an industrial center, or even in a foreign country. Careers in either professional practice or teaching and research are common for 
many graduates who complete advanced degrees. 

Facilities 

The Department of Civil Engineering has well-equipped laboratories, including a computer laboratory. The College of Engineering at 
NCSU maintains a state-of-the-art computing environment known as Project Eos, a large-scale distributed system that consists of 
approximately 665 workstations in 23 labs. Over 80 of these machines are housed by the Department Civil Engineering in Mann 
Hall. A comprehensive suite of engineering applications is delivered to three platforms: Sun Solaris, Microsoft Windows, and Red 
Hat Linux. Project Eos is operated by a professional support group that provides consultation and basic system and software services. 
A new classroom outfitted for computer-based instruction opened in Mann Hall in January 2003. 

The Department's other laboratories contain a variety of special equipment for instniction and research in structures, mechanics, 
soils, construction materials, construction engineering, hydraulics and environmental engineering. 

The Constructed Facilities Laboratory (CFL) on Centennial Campus features unique facilities devoted to all aspects of constructed 
infrastructure research and assessment. Facilities include: specially designed reaction fioors and walls for testing large-scale 
structural systems to failure, such as full scale bridge girders up to 100 feet long and beam-column systems subject to earthquake 
loading; and large pits up to 20 feet deep for testing granulary and compacted soils for foundation strength. State-of-the-art facilities 
like these heighten students" learning experiences by exposing them to the forefront of technological advances. 

Curricula 

Each curriculum is designed to prepare the graduate for a career in the respective field and for lifelong learning through graduate 
education, continuing education and/or self-study. 

The Civil Engineering curriculum provides academic discipline in mathematics, the physical sciences, the humanities and social 
sciences, and the technical aspects of civil engineering. After introductory exposure to several of the professional areas such as 
environmental and water resources, geotechnical, structures, and transportation engineering, the student builds additional depth in 
one of these specialties. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Educational Objectives in Civil Engineering 

The Department of Civil Engineering at NC State is home to the educational programs in Civil Engineering, Construction 
Engineering and Management, and Environmental Engineering. A single department head and management structure direct the 
educational missions of these three related fields. The educational objectives of the Bachelor of Science degree program in Civil 
Engineering are as follows: 

To prepare students for entry into successful careers in Civil Engineering, emphasizing the mastery of engineering fundamentals, 
the ability to solve engineering problems, the importance of engineering judgment and engineering experimentation, and the 
process of engineering design. 
• To instill in students the sense of pride and confidence that comes from applying their knowledge of engineering principles and 
procedures to the economic and social benefit of society. 

To encourage in students an understanding of the professional and ethical obligations of the engineer, to conduct themselves as 
professionals, recognizing their responsibility to protect the health and welfare of the public, and to be accountable for the social 
and environmental impact of their engineering practice. 



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To establish an educational environment in which students participate in multi-disciplinary, team oriented, open-ended activities 

that prepare them to work in integrated engineering teams. 

To offer a curriculum that encourages students to become broadly educated engineers and life-long learners, with a solid 

background in the basic sciences and mathematics, an understanding and appreciation of the arts, humanities, and social 

sciences, an ability to communicate effectively for various audiences and purposes, and a desire to seek out further educational 

opportunities. 

• To expose students to advances in engineering practice and research as preparation for opportunities in professional practice and 
graduate education. 

To acquire, maintain, and operate facilities and laboratory equipment appropriate to the civil engineering program, and to 
incorporate traditional and state-of-the-art technology and methods. 

• To recniit, develop, and retain faculty who are committed to the educational mission of the civil engineering program, to ensure 
that these educational objectives are met. 

The Construction Engineering and Management curriculum is designed for the student interested in the planning, design, 
direction, and management of construction projects. It includes the core course requirements in mathematics, the physical sciences, 
and the humanities and social sciences. After exposure to engineering fundamentals and engineering design of facilities, the 
curriculum provides a series of specialty courses in construction engineering related to the analysis, design, and management of the 
construction building, residential, highway, and heavy construction industry. The Mechanical Construction Concentration is designed 
for students pursuing a mechanical construction career, emphasizing systems for buildings, residences, and industrial facilities. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Construction Engineering and Management, General Construction Concentration 
Construction Engineering and Management, Mechanical Construction Concentration 

Educational Objectives in Construction Engineering and Management 

To prepare students for entry into successful careers in Construction Engineering and Management, emphasizing a fundamental 
understanding of construction engineering and management principles, the ability to solve a broad set of engineering problems in 
construction, the importance of engineering judgment and the creative process of engineering design. 

To introduce students to the practice of construction engineering, the design of the construction process, and the management of 
construction projects to achieve safety, quality, durability, and economic objectives. 

To enable an understanding of the societal and economic impacts of construction engineering practice and the professional and 
ethical responsibilities of the construction engineer. 

To provide learning opportunities which prepare the construction engineering and management graduate to function in team- 
oriented, multidisciplinary, open-ended engineering activities. 

To provide a curriculum which broadly educates students with: a solid background in the basic sciences and mathematics; an 
ability to communicate effectively; an understanding and appreciation for the humanities, social sciences, and management 
services; and an ability to engage in life-long learning through graduate study, mentoring, self study, or continuing education. 

• To establish and maintain the institutional support and financial resources to recruit, develop, and retain faculty who are 
committed to the program objectives and the university missions, and to acquire, maintain, and operate adequate facilities to 
meet program objectives and promote learning. 

The Environmental Engineering curriculum is designed for students interested in environmental protection. The curriculum 
provides students with basic knowledge of the chemical, biological and physical processes that govern the transport and fate of 
pollutants in the environment as well as the design of engineered treatment systems. On graduation, students are prepared to work in 
the areas of water and wastewater treatment, air pollution control, solid waste management, and hydrology and water resources. The 
curriculum emphasizes the interdisciplinary nature of environmental engineering with courses in both engineering and life sciences, 
including specialized courses on pollution control and waste management. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/regrecords/curricula 

Educational Objectives in Environmental Engineering 

• To prepare students for entry into successful careers in Environmental Engineering, emphasizing the mastery of environmental 
science and engineering fundamentals, the ability to solve engineering problems, the importance of engineering judgment and 
the creative process of engineering design. 

To introduce students to engineering practices for the management and protection of air, water, and terrestrial environments and 
the protection of human health, and to encourage students to develop an understanding of the overall significance of both 
scientific and policy issues as they relate to the environment. 

• To provide students with an understanding of the professional and ethical obligations of the engineer, to encourage them to 
conduct themselves as professionals in recognition of their responsibility to protect the health and welfare of the public, to 
explain to students their accountability for the social, economic, and environmental impacts of their engineering practices. 
To provide students with an understanding of the role of the environmental engineer in engineering projects and to prepare 
students to function in cross-disciplinary, team-oriented, open-ended activities. 

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• To prepare broadly educated engineers with: an ability to communicate effectively; an understanding of the need for life-long 
learning; and an appreciation for the arts, humanities, and social sciences. 

To expose students to the role of research in environmental engineering and to prepare students for opportunities in graduate 
education. 

Post-Baccalaureate Study 

If a student is interested in more intense specialization in one particular area, advanced level training is available leading to the 
Master of Civil Engineering, the Master of Science or the Doctor of Philosophy. Specialization areas include coastal engineering, 
computer-aided engineering, construction engineering and management, construction materials, environmental and water resources 
engineering, geotechnical engineering, mechanics and structural engineering and transportation engineering. With judicious choices 
of electives during the B.S. program, a student may also prepare for additional studies in law, business administration, business 
management and city and regional planning. 

Student Activities and Scholarships 

Student chapters of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Associated General Contractors, National Association of Home 
Builders, Institute of Transportation Engineers, and Air and Waste Management Association undertake projects to further student 
exposure to the profession. Guest speakers representing various aspects of engineering practice speak at weekly lunch meetings. 
Students who accumulate outstanding academic records may be considered for membership in the Chi Epsilon Honorary Society. 
Through the generosity of industry and program alumni, many scholarships are available on a competitive basis to students in 
addition to university, college, and need-based financial aid. 

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Withers Hall, Rooms 208 and 226 
phone; (919)515-2858 

M. A. Vouk, Head 

D. J. Thuente, Director of Graduate Programs 

J. Hatch, Coordinator of Advising 

D. A. Lasher, Director of Student Services 

Distinguished University Research Professor: D.L. Bitzer; Alumni 
Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: A.L. Tharp; SAS Institute 
Chair Professor: J. Doyle; Emeritus Professors: W. Chou, D.C. Martin, 
W.E. Robbins; Professors: D.L. Bitzer, E.W. Davis, Jr., J. Doyle, R.J. 
Fomaro, R.E. Funderlick, S.P Iyer, D.F. McAllister, H.G Perros, D.S. 
Reeves, R.D. Rodman, G.N. Rouskas, CD. Savage, M.P. Singh, W.J. 
Stewart, A.L. Tharp, M.A. Vouk; Associate Professors: A.I. Anton, 
D.R. Bahler, E.F. Gehringer, C.G Healey, T.L. Honeycutt, J.C. Lester, 
I. Rhee, R.A. St. Amant, M.F. Stallmann, D.J. Thuente; Assistant 

Professors: R.Y. Chirkova, R. Dutta, V. Freeh, K. Harfoush, S. Herber, J. Kang, X. Ma, F. Mueller, P. Ning, L.A. Williams, PR. 
Wurman, J. Xu, R.M. Young, T. Yu; Visiting Research Professor: F. Brglez; Adjunct Professors; R.J. Plemmons; Adjunct Associate 
Professor: A.O. Zaghloul; Adjunct Assistant Professors: D. Pase, A. Rindos, M. Singh; Lecturers: K. Branting, J. Hatch, D.A. Lasher, 
C.S. Miller, T.E. Nelson, J. Schwarz; Director of Multimedia Lab: D.H. Kekas; Director of ePartners; Ken Tate; Resaesrch 
Assistants: J.C. Bass, J.E. Robinson; Associate Members of the Department: J.W. Baugh, Jr. (Civil Engineering), GT. Byrd 
(Electrical and Computer Engineering), T.M. Cont (Electrical and Computer Engineering), A.G. Dean (Electrical and Computer 
Engineering), M. Devetsikiotis (Electrical and Computer Engineering), E. Kaltofen (Mathematics), G Lazzi (Electrical and 
Computer Engineering), CD. Meyer, Jr. (Mathematics), T.K. Miller (Distance Education and Learning Technology Applications), 
M.A. Rappa (Business Management), E. Rotenberg (Electrical and Computer Engineering), J.S. Scoggs (Mathematics), M.L. Sichitiu 
(Electrical and Computer Engineering), W.E. Snyder (Electrical and Computer Engineering), Y Solihin (Electrical and Computer 
Engineering) I. Viniotis (Electrical and Computer Engineering) W. Wang (Electrical and Computer Engineering). 

Computers 

Computers and computing are ubiquitous in modem society. The discipline of computer science has evolved during the past three 
decades with the expanding role of computers. New applications of computers continue to appear. They are used to design, 
manufacture and operate our automobiles, airplanes and spacecraft; to design our highways, bridges and buildings; to manage 
banking transactions; to help managers make decisions; to analyze farm production; to help the research scientist; and to monitor 
manufacturing processes and utilities. Computer science is the essential technology for information access and transfer. 

Opportunities 

Computer scientists have many career choices because of the diversity of computer use. A graduate may be involved in the design, 
implementation, or management of software systems or may adapt com.puters to new applications. Whatever your ambitions and 
preferences, computer science offers opportunities pursuing an advanced degree, working in a team or alone, interacting frequently 
with people or not, working with tried and true systems or designing the latest technology. 




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Curriculum 

This undergraduate curriculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Computer Science. This program is accredited by the 
Computer Science Accreditation Commission of the Computing Sciences Accreditation Board, a specialized accrediting body 
recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education. Core courses provide the 
fundamentals of programming concepts, computer science theory, data structures, computer organization, operating systems, and 
software engineering. Restricted electi\es. chosen in consultation with one's adviser beginning in the junior year, allow exploration 
of specific computer science sub-areas such as database management systems, operating systems, graphics, multimedia technology, 
artificial intelligence, netw orks, computer-human interlaces and architecture. New areas include network and data security, data 
mining, and eCommerce, among others. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING 

Daniels Hall, Room 232 
phone: (919)515-2336 

Robert J. Trew, Head and Alton and Mildred Lancaster Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

J.J. Brickley, Jr., Associate Head 

H.J. Trussell, Director of Graduate Programs 

C.W. Tovvnsend, Coordinator of Advising 

Distinguished University Professor: B.J. Baliga; Distinguished Professor of 

Electrical and Computer Engineering: J.R. Hauser, N.A. Masnari; Professors: W.E. 

Alexander, S.M. Bedair, G.L. Bilbro, M.Y. Chow, T.M. Conte, RD. Franzon, J.J. 

Grainger, B.L. Hughes, G.J. lafrate, K.W. Kim, R.M. Kolbas, W.T. Liu, L. Lunardi, 

T.K. Miller, H.T. Nagle, A.A. Nilson, CM. Osbum, M.C. Ozturk, S.A. Rajala, W.E. 

Snyder, M.B. Steer, J.K. Townsend, H.J. Trussell; Named Professor Emeritus: D.R. 

Rhodes Professors Emeriti: T.H. Gilsson, A.J. Goetze, J.F. Kaufifman, M.A. 

Littlejohn, L.K. Monteith, J.B. O'Neal, Jr., A. Reismann, J.J. Wortman Associate 

Professors: S.T. Alexander, M.E. Baran, M. Devetsikiotis, A. Duel-Hallen, E.F. 

Gehringer, E. Grant, A.H. Krim, G. Lazzi, V. Misra, I. Viniotis, M.W. White; 

Associate Professor Emeritus: W.T. Easter; Assistant Professors: D. W. Barlage, 

G.T. Byrd, H. Dai, W.R. Davis, A.G Dean, D.Y. Eun, K. Gard, X. Liu, J.F. Muth, E. 

Rotenburg, S. Sair, M. Sichitu, Y. Solihin, W. Wang, Z. Zhang; Visiting Professor: 

J. Mink; Visiting Associate Professor: J.J. Brickley, Jr.; Visiting Assistant 

Professors: R.T. Kuehn, H.O. Ozturk, M.L. Reed. S.J. Walsh, D.G. Yu, P Zhao; 

Visiting Research Professor: W.C. Holton; Research Professors: J.F. Schetzina, R.E. Singleton; Research Assistant Professor: A.A. 

Kiselev; Visiting Instnictor: C.W. Townsend; Lecturer: B.J. Greene; Adjunct Professor: R.K. Cavin. J. Chang, M. Dutta, R.C. Luo, 

W.T. Lynch, M.A. Stroscio, R.J. Ulman, J.M. Zavada; Adjunct Associate Professor: D.J. Bradley, J.R. Burke. W.W. Edmonson, C.S. 

Gloster, R.S. Gyurcsik. D.J. Herr, S.S. Lee, H.Z. Massoud. A.S. Mortazawi, N.C. Strole, D. Temple, D.L. Woolard; Adjunct Assistant 

Professor: T.M. Bradicich, W.J. Chimiak, W.E. Cohen, D.L. Dreifus. E.W. Fulp, M.D. Gerhold, M.J. Gonnan, D.W. Hislop, F.Y. Jou, 

A. Jungreis. A.W. Kelley, PK. McLarty, K.J. Molnar, A.S. Morris, A.J. Montalvo, D. Novosel, R.O. Onvural, S.D. Rampal, A.J. 

Rindos^ P Satago, J.C. Sutton, E.M. Vogel, C.K. Williams, A.J. Yezzi, M. Yousif; Adjunct Lecturer: J. Branigan, H.C. Cranford, C.A. 

Sastre, J. P. Streck; Interinstitutional Adjunct; J. Brock, Laboratory Supervisor: J.N. O'SuUivan, Associate Members of the 

Department: D. Bitzer (Computer Science), S. Blanchard (BME), E. Davis (Computer Science), J. Herkert (Multidisciplinary 

Studies), W. Jasper (Textiles), G. Lucovsky (Physics), D. McAllister (Computer Science), J. Narayan (Materials Science and 

Engineering), H. Perros (Computer Science), W. Robbins (Computer Science), J, M. Stallman (Computer Science), M. Vouk 

(Computer Science). 

The professions of electrical engineering and computer engineering are concerned with the analysis, design, construction and testing 
of systems based on electrical phenomena. In contemporary society, electrical methods are used to communicate and store 
information, control equipment and systems, perform mathematical operations, and convert energy from one form to another. 
Frequently, two or more of these functions are important in the design of systems such as television, radio, telecommunications, 
computer, robots and intelligent machines, telemetry systems, solid-state electronics, vehicle safety systems, biomedical devices, 
environmental controls, electric machinery, and electric power generation and transmission facilities. 

Computer engineering is a field in w hich digital techniques are used in system design. Low-cost solid-state microprocessors and 
memories permit computers to be w idely incorporated in many different types of devices from toys to traffic control systems. To 
work etTectively in this rapidly grow ing t1eld. the computer engineer must understand both hardware and software techniques and 
must effectively use both in order to design, build and test complex digital systems. Both the electrical engineering and the computer 
engineering programs, which lead respectively to the degrees. Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering and Bachelor of Science 
in Computer Engineering, are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering 
and Technology (ABET). 

Scholarships and Awards 

Superior academic performance is recognized within this department in three ways: election of students to membership in the 
electrical engineering honor society, Eta Kappa Nu; awarding merit scholarships; and presentation of awards to outstanding seniors. 

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The department has one endowed merit scholarship for rising sophomores, the Eugene C. and Winifred Sakshaug Scholarship, and 
sixteen endowed scholarships which are usually awarded to juniors and seniors: William E. Clark, Elizabeth P. Cockrell, William and 
Tipton Gray, John and Ann Hauser, Llewellyn Hewett, William and Carol Highfill, L. A. Mahler, Amelia N. Mitta, Frank T. 
Pankotay, Pratt Family, William DeRosset Scott III, E. Chester Seewald, Herbert B. Walker, Simon B. Woolard, North Carolina 
Electric Membership Corporation, and William D. Stevenson, Jr., the latter two of which are for students studying electric power 
systems. The department also from time to time has scholarships provided by industrial organizations such as the Square D, Duke 
Power, Progress Energy, Lockheed Martin, and Sprint. Academic merit is generally the primarily requirement for these awards, but 
other characteristics, such as demonstrated leadership, may also be specified. In addition, the endowed William M. Cates Scholarship 
Program provides multiple scholarships for students having documented financial need and high academic performance. These are 
awarded each fall to juniors, with provision for continuation in the senior year. 

Facilities 

Many courses are accompanied by coordinated laboratory work and projects. These assignments typically focus on real-world 
systems and problems and involve computer simulation and analysis, design, development and testing of hardware and software 
associated with electrical, electronic, and electromechanical systems, circuits, and devices. Extensive facilities are provided for 
experimental study of analog and digital circuits, microprocessors, computers, VLSI devices, robots and intelligent machines and 
telecommunications. The Eos System, a network of state-of-the art engineering workstations, provides a powerful computing 
environment available to all students. An Eos laboratory suite with more than sixty workstations is located within the department. 
The department provides knowledgeable lab operators for this facility throughout the week. A student may log in at over 500 
workstations located in this lab and several other facilities throughout the College of Engineering. Powerftil software is provided on 
the system for engineering analysis, design and testing, symbolic mathematics, sophisticated color graphics, scientific spreadsheets, 
programming languages, work processing, document formatting and other special applications. Some of this industry-standard 
software is not available on personal computers. The department has the William F. Troxler Design Center which provides resources 
for many required industry-sponsored, semester-long design projects. Weekly sessions are scheduled in the Undergraduate Teaching 
Center by teaching assistants to answer student questions about course material. 

Core Courses 

The electrical and computer engineering curricula share core courses comprising a substantial portion of the first three years of study. 
Most of the core courses are offered three times a year in fall, spring, and summer. A strong emphasis is placed on fundamental 
concepts in core courses, so that graduates are prepared for rapid technological changes common in the electrical and computer 
engineering professions. A comprehensive foundation in mathematics and the physical sciences in the freshman year is followed in 
subsequent years by additional core courses in mathematics, physics, electric circuit theory, digital logic, computer systems, 
electronics, and linear systems. Laboratory work is designed to demonstrate fundamental principles and to provide experience in 
designing and testing electronic hardware and computer software. Both curricula have required senior design project courses which 
give students comprehensive experience in designing, building, and testing physical systems. 

Curricula 

In addition to the core courses described above, students in the electrical engineering curriculum take six specialization electives in 
areas of their choice within the discipline and two technical electives, which are selected engineering courses offered by other 
departments. Beyond the core, students in the computer engineering curriculum take courses in discrete mathematics, data structures, 
embedded systems, and complex digital systems, in addition to four specialization electives in areas of their choice and one technical 
elective. For both curricula, a variety of elective courses are offered in communications, computational intelligence, controls, digital 
signal processing, digital systems, mechatronics, microelectronics, networking robotics, and VLSI design. There are typically a 
dozen or more of these courses offered each Fall and Spring Semester and two or three available each summer. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Curriculum in Computer Engineering, Bachelor of Science 
Curriculum in Electrical Engineering, Bachelor of Science 
Curriculum, B.S. Computer Engineering, M.S. Computer Engineering 
Curriculum, B.S. Electrical Engineering, M.S. Electrical Engineering 

Individualized Degree Program in Engineering 

Page Hall, Room 1 1 8 
phone: (919)515-2315 

The B.S. in Engineering degree offers an individualized academic program for those exceptional students who have academic and 
career goals that cannot be accommodate by the other engineering degree programs. Before being admitted into the program, students 
must complete the freshman year, and have at least a 2.5 grade point average, have completed the requirements for admission into an 
engineering degree program and have a plan of study approved by the student's advisory committee and the Dean of Engineering. For 
information, contact the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs at (919)515-2315 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Mechatronics Concentration in Engineering 

Degree Offered: B.S. in Engineering 

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This degree offers students a multi-disciplinary education in design and product development processes. The curriculum integrates 
the classical fields of mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, computer science, and computer engineering. This multi- 
disciplinary field of study is known today as "Mechatronics" and instills the basic principles needed to design and build intelligent 
systems or products that exhibit automated, precise performance. The design of these modem mechanical systems is characterized by 
the integration and extensive use of sensors, actuators, optics, microelectronics and computers. The spectrum of application includes 
numerically controlled machines, robotics, engine and motor control systems, and microelectromechanical devices, to name but a 
few. Design considerations within the curriculum address aspects of system reliability and efficiency, in addition to function. The 
Mechatronics concentration for the curriculum supports the "synergistic integration of precision mechanical engineering, electronics 
control, and systems thinking into the design of intelligent products and processes." Students enrolled in the BSE-Mechatronics 
Concentration are resident at UNC-Asheville in Ashcville, NC. The degree is granted by NC State. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg records/curricula 

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Riddick Engineering Laboratories, Room 328 

phone: (919)515-2362 

www.ie.ncsu.edu 

J. R. Wilson, Head 

C. L. Smith, Assistant Head and Director of Undergraduate Programs 

S. C. Fang, Director of Graduate Programs 

H. L. W. Nuttle, Associate Director of Graduate Programs 

Henry A. Foscue Professor: C.T. Culbreath; University Professor: S.E. Elmaghraby; Walter Clark Professor: S.C. Fang; James T. 
Ryan Professors: T.J. Hodgson; Professors: M.A. Ayoub. R.H. Bernard, X. Chao, Y. Fathi, R.E. King, W.L. Meier, H.L.W. Nuttle, 
S.D. Roberts, J.R. Wilson, R.E. Young: Professors Emeriti: R.E. Alvarez, C.A. Anderson, J.R. Canada, R.G. Pearson, A.L. Prack, 
W.A. Smith, Jr.; Associate Professors: D.R. Cormier, D.B. Kaber, M.G. Kay, Y.S. Lee, G.A. Mirka, E.T. Sanii; Assistant Professor: 
O.L.A. Harrysson; Lecturer: C.S. Alderman, C.L. Smith. 

The Department of Industrial Engineering otTers an undergraduate B.S. program in Industrial Engineering. Four areas of educational 
focus are provided under this program: operations research, production systems, ergonomics and manufacturing. Additionally, a 
BSIE Furniture Manufacturing degree track is offered as an accredited specialization within the standard BSIE. In a cooperative 
effort of faculty representing all focus areas, the following undergraduate educational objectives were developed. 

The educational objectives of this department are: 

1. To actively recruit and retain qualified students and to prepare those students for entry into successful employment as 
industrial engineers in industry, service, consulting, and/or government organizations or for advanced study at leading 
graduate schools in engineering, business, management, or other technical or non-technical fields. 

2. To educate students in a broad range of areas related to effective and established engineering practice, including engineering 
design, physical as well as engineering sciences, mathematics, information technology, and analytical problem solving. 

3. To encourage students to pursue meaningful work experiences through cooperative education and internships and through 
course practicum/project experiences and to provide students the tool of systems and management engineering, preparing 
them for the professional and ethical management of people, processes, systems, and products in a wide variety of settings. 

4. To encourage teamwork skills, particularly the ability to work with people from other fields in integrated engineering teams 
and the leadership skills for maximizing the performance of those teams. 

5. To offer a curriculum that encourages students to become broadly educated engineers and life-long learners, with an 
understanding and appreciation of the arts, humanities, and social sciences, an ability to communicate effectively with 
various audiences and purposes, and a desire to seek out further educational opportunities. 

6. To expose students to advances in engineering practice and research as preparation for opportunities in graduate education. 

7. To obtain resources necessary to recruit, develop, and retain faculty, laboratory, teaching and research assistants and other 
support staff who are committed to the educational mission of the department and to acquire, maintain, and operate facilities 
and laboratory equipment appropriate to our engineering program. 

The Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering, Furniture Manufacturing prepares graduates for both engineering and managerial 
positions in the furniture industry. The furniture industry is one of the largest industries in North Carolina. The curriculum offers 
industrial engineering students a concentrated study of the materials, products, and processes of the furniture industry. 

The Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering (as well as the optional Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering, Furniture 
Manufacturing) is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology, 1 1 1 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012; phone: (410)347-7700. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Curriculum in Industrial Engineering 

Curriculum in Industrial Engineering, Furniture Manufacturing 

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Minor in Industrial Engineering 

The minor in Industrial Engineering is designed to provide undergraduate engineering students and other science majors in curricula 
other than Industrial Engineering with the fundamentals of industrial engineering necessary for advanced study in the discipline and/ 
or employment in industrial engineering to acquire some level of expertise in areas common to all industrial engineers as well as a 
deeper knowledge in at least one specific area of interest. 

Admissions and Certification ofMinor 

Students should contact Clarence Smith. 3 19- A Riddick Engineering Laboratories, (919)515-6416, clarence_smith(a!ncsu.edu for 
admission to and certification of the minor in Industrial Engineering. The minor must be completed no later than the semester in 
which the student expects to graduate from his or her degree program. Paperwork for certification can be found in 33 1 -A Riddick 
Engineering Laboratories and should be completed no later than during the registration period for the student's final semester at NC 
State. 

Minor in Furniture Manufacturing 

The minor in Furniture Manufacturing is open to all undergraduate degree students at NC State who are interested in gaining 
specialized knowledge of furniture product engineering and related manufacturing processes and design. A set of four cohesive 
courses provides for a concentrated study of this manufacturing industry as well as the application of industrial engineering 
fundamentals. 

Admissions and Certification ofMinor 

Students should contact Clarence Smith, 319-A Riddick Engineering Laboratories, (919)515-6416, clarence_smith(Sincsu.edu for 
admission to and certification of the minor in Furniture Manufacturing. The minor must be completed no later than the semester in 
which the student expects to graduate from his or her degree program. Paperwork for certification can be found in 33 1 -A Ridding 
Engineering Laboratories and should be completed no later than during the registration period for the student's final semester at NC 
State. 

Accelerated Baccalaureate/Masters (ABM) Program 

This program will allow exceptional undergraduate students to complete both undergraduate and graduate degrees at an accelerated 
pace. The student is allowed up to 12 credit hours to be counted towards both the undergraduate and graduate degrees. 

Requirements: 

• Have completed a minimum of 75 credit hours and up to a maximum of 96 credit hours by the end of the current semester 
(includes transfer credits). 

Earned a GPA of at least 3.5 for all courses and 3.5 for all Industrial Engineering courses. 

• Satisfied all prerequisite requirements for 400 level courses. 

• A letter of recommendation from the undergraduate teaching adviser identifying the applicant as a participant in the ABM 
program should accompany the application as well as the course numbers and titles of the 12 credit hours to be used for both the 
bachelor's and master's degree programs. 

Whether in the traditional B.S. or combined B.S.-MIE/MSIE, ABET and university requirements will be satisfied based upon the 
four (4) year curriculum. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 

Riddick Engineering Laboratories, Room 229 
phone: (919)515-2377 

J. M. Rigsbee, Head 

C. C. Koch, Associate Head 

R. O. Scattergood, Director of Graduate Programs 

CM. Balik, Director of Undergraduate Programs 

Kobe Steel Professor: R.F. Davis; Distinguished Research Professors: J.J. Cuomo, J. Narayan; Professors: K. Bachmann. CM. Balik, 
D.W. Brenner, R.B. Benson, Jr., J.J. Hren, N. El-Masry, A.I. Kingon, CC Koch, K.L. Murty, J.M. Rigsbee, G.A. Rozgonyi, RE. 
Russell, R.O. Scattergood, Z. Sitar, R. Spontak; Associate Professor: J. Kasichainula; Assistant Professors: G. Duscher, M. Johnson, 
J. P. Maria; Professors Emeriti: W.W. Austin, H. Conrad, A.A. Fahmy, K.L. Moazed, H. Palmour III, H.H. Stadelmaier, R.F. Stoops; 
Associate Professor Emeritis: J. Hamme; Visiting Professor: K. Dawes; Visiting Associate Professor: D. Griffis; Senior Lecturers: Y. 
Fahmy, T.M. Hare; Adjunct Professors: O. Auciello, G.L. Doll, J.T. Glass, J.T. Prater, R. Reeber, J. Russ, F. Shimura; Associate 
Members of the Faculty: D. Aspnes (Physics), J. A. Bailey (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering), S.M. Bedair (Electrical and 
Computer Engineering), K.S. Havner (Professor of Civil Engineering), H. Lamb (Chemical Engineering), G. Lucovsky (Physics), 
R.J. Nemanich (Physics), G Parsons (Chemical Engineering), I. Rovner (Sociology and Anthropology); Inter-institutional Adjunct 
Faculty: J. Sankar (NC A&T State University). 

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers programs to qualify graduates for positions in this industry, R&D 
laboratories, educational institutions, and governmental agencies. This basic education involves design, development selection, and 

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processing of engineered materials. Industries served by graduates in materials science and engineering are aerospace, automotive. 
chemical and chemical processing, communications, electronics, energy production, manufacturing, nuclear, and transportation. This 
program has been accredited by the EngineerinK Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology. 1 1 1 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore. MD 212024012; phone: (410)347-7700. 

The educational objectives of the Materials Science and Engineering curriculum are: 

To produce graduates who are able to apply the principles of mathematics, science, and engineering, so they are prepared for 

entry-level engineering jobs or graduate school. 

To produce graduates who are knowledgeable about a variety of engineering materials (including metals, semiconductors, 

ceramics, polymers, and composites), and the relationships among processing, structure, properties, and performance. 

To produce graduates who are able to define and solve problems, especially those involving materials selection and design, and 

are capable of developing, implementing and evaluation solutions via integration of their basic scientific skills and knowledge. 

To produce graduates who are able to communicate efiectively and who demonstrate the ability to function on multi-disciplinary 

teams. 

To produce graduates who are skilled at using modern engineering tools for analysis, design, and communication. 

To produce graduates who are able to understand their responsibility to their profession and society in a global context and who 

are prepared for and realize the importance of life-long learning. 

Graduates of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering will be prepared to define and solve engineering problems 
through the application of modem engineering tools and basic principles of mathematics, science, and engineering. Graduates will be 
knowledgeable about all types of engineering materials and able to communicate effectively and function in interdisciplinary teams. 
Graduates will operate with a clear understanding of professional ethics and will recognize the global context of their jobs and the 
importance of lifelong learning. 

Opportunities 

The continuing industrial and technological growth of the United States, the general southeast, and the state of North Carolina has 
been marked by a particularly strong and increasing demand for materials engineers and scientists. Modem technological advances 
require new materials and novel processing and/or fabrication methods. At the national level, materials research is prominently 
mentioned in most lists of critical or enabling technologies. As our understanding of materials science advances, common features 
and elements tend to unite many different industries. As an example, consider that our current knowledge of silicon is necessary in 
the electronics, photovoltaics, optical fiber technologies, lasers, pollution control, and biomedical industries. Advanced 
understanding of polymers also crosses and unites several different industries such as plastics, textiles, electronics, and recycling. 

Education in materials science and engineering provides career opportunities in a wide range of industries from those that produce 
and/or use metals, glass, polymers, or ceramics, to those which use such materials in an integrated fashion such as the 
microelectronics industry. These opportunities include careers in research and development of new materials, new processes for 
producing them, failure analysis, product design and reliability, and technical management at all levels of business. The importance 
and growth potential of the materials science and engineering discipline is reflected by a recent U.S. Department of Labor study 
which predicts that over the next decade the demand for materials engineers and scientists will exceed that of any other engineering 
discipline. 

Curricula 

The materials scientist and engineer must understand the wide range of phenomena that occur in all classes of materials: metals, 
polymers, composites, and electronic materials. The undergraduate curriculum is designed to provide balance by addressing the 
scientific and engineering principles applicable to all classes of materials as well as the particular engineering and design concepts 
unique to each class of material. Further emphasis in a specific area is provided by choosing one technical elective dealing with 
processing (inetallic, ceramic, polymeric or semiconducting materials) and one technical elective dealing with specific applications 
(composite materials or electronic materials). The basic science elective allows students to gain more fundamental knowledge in 
either solid-state theory, organic, or physical chemistry. The required senior design courses (MAT 423-424) serve as capstone courses 
and provide a strong preparation for dealing v\ ith real industrial situations. MAT 423 covers open-ended classroom exercises and 
involvement in group dynamics and proposal preparation. MAT 424 provides direct involvement \s ith an industrial sponsor working 
on real problems submitted by industry. The remaining required courses are distributed among mathematics, physical sciences, and 
the humanities and social sciences. 

The materials science and engineering program, which is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), leads to the degree Bachelor of Science in Materials Science and 
Engineering. A fifth year professional program is available for the advanced study and further specialization. Graduate degrees are 
also offered (consult the Graduate Catalog). 

Specific curriculum requirements are a\ailable online: www.ncsu.edii/reg_records/curricula 

Minor in Materials Science and Engineering 

The Minor in Materials Science and Engineering provides a fundamental understanding of materials to non-MSE undergraduate 
engineering students (mechanical engineers, electrical engineers, etc.) and other science majors. The Minor in Materials Science and 



College of Engineering 



Engineering offers a concentration in basic principles and a choice of specific areas of interest including ceramic, polymeric, 
metallic, or electronic materials. This minor requires 17-19 hours of concentration including MAT 201 and MAT 210. The GPA for 
minor courses must be at least a 2.0. Further information regarding a Minor in Materials Science and Engineering is available from 
the Director of Undergraduate Programs. 

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 

Broughton Hall, Room 32111 
phone: (919)515-2365 

M. N. Noori, R. J. Reynolds Professor and Head 

W. R. Roberts, IV, Associate Professor and Associate Head 

R. D. Gould, Professor and Director of Graduate Programs 

R. T. Nagel, Professor and Director of the Aerospace Program 

H. Davoodi, Lecturer and Director of Undergraduate Development 

M. L. Gonzalez, Lecturer and Director of Undergraduate Advising and Curricula 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: E.M. Afify, M.A. Boles, R.R. Johnson; Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professors: 
F.R. DeJamette, H.A. Hassan; Professors: T.A. Dow, R.F. Keltic, C. Kleinstreuer, D.S. McRae, P.L Ro, L.M. Silverberg, J.S. 
Strenkowski, F.G. Yuan, M.A. Zikry; Professor and Senior Extension Specialist: H.M. Eckerlin; Adjunct Professor: J. P. Archie; 
Professors Emeriti: J. A. Bailey. M.H. Clayton, J. A. Edwards, F.J. Hale, F.D. Hart, T.H. Hodgson, E.G. Humphries, C.J. Maday, J.C. 
Mulligan, M.N. Ozisik, L.H. Royster, F.O. Smetana, F.Y. Sorrell, J.K. Whitfield, C.F. Zorowski; Associate Professors: J.R. Edwards, 
Jr., J.W. Eischen, C.E. Hall, Jr., E.C. Klang, A.V. Kuznetsov, J.W. Leach, K.M. Lyons, A. Mazzoleni, M.K. Ramasubramanian, S. 
Seelecke; Adjunct Associate Professors: P.B. Corson; Assistant Professors: G.D. Buckner, T. Echekki, A. Gopalarathnam, N. Ma, G. 
Ngaile, K.J. Peters, A. Rabiei, J. Tu, T. Zeng, F. Wu; Adjunct Assistant Professors: M.M. Nazemi; Lecturers: S.N. Heinzen, CM. 
Tran.; Adjunct Lecturer: B. Bahram; Researcher and Extension Specialist: S. D. Terry 

Aerospace engineering is the application of science and engineering principles to the design, development, and implementation of 
systems or vehicles that travel above the surface of the earth. The vehicles may include a variety of aircraft and spacecraft such as 
low-speed propeller-powered aircraft, high-speed jet-powered aircraft, remotely piloted vehicles, micro air vehicles, hovercraft, and 
helicopters, along with space related vehicles and systems that include rockets, spacecraft, space stations, planetary rovers, and 
various specialty equipment such as heat shields, and other protective and deployment devices. The design of these vehicles and 
systems is both difficult and challenging because they must operate reliably and efficiently in harsh environments. Aerospace 
Engineering is intimately involved in the design, manufacture, control, and operation of these systems coupled with a consideration 
of environmental, economical, ethical, and social issues. 

Mechanical engineering involves practical application of mechanical and thermal sciences to research, design, development, testing, 
and manufacturing of a wide variety of products. The diverse areas to which mechanical engineers contribute include transportation, 
power generation and energy conversion, environmental control and pollution abatement, noise control, and biomechanics. Recent 
developments have increased interest in such areas as robotics, mechatronics, precision engineering, automated manufacturing 
systems, combustion, and propulsion. Student projects include Min-Baja, Formula Cars, and walking machines. 

Aerospace: The program is supported with laboratories where students obtain hands-on experience with state-of-the-art 
instrumentation and computers. Low-speed and high-speed wind tunnels and structural and material facilities are used for testing 
prototype models. A prominent feature of the program is the student's involvement in design, construction, and flight-testing of novel 
aircraft designs, a pedagogical device pioneered by the Aerospace Engineering Program at NC State University. The spacecraft 
design involves construction and flight readiness testing of satellites and spacecraft. In addition, the program is supported by strong 
research activities and dedicated faculty who provide personalized attention to students. 

Mechanical: The mechanical engineering program is comprehensive in that it consists of both analytical/numerical and experimental 
activities and laboratories. Computational facilities consist of three computer laboratories, using both UNIX and Windows NT 
platforms. Computational software available includes mathematical and solution algorithms, as well as modem design and analysis 
tools. The experimental laboratories include measurements and data analysis, performance evaluation of thermal systems and power 
plants, and testing and analysis of mechanical components. The senior design laboratory jointly supported by the department and 
industry. This is a unique laboratory facility, which is the involvement of students in solving actual industrial problems by designing, 
building, and testing prototype machines. The laboratory facilities are supported by a machine shop and an electronics facility. Also 
housed in the mechanical engineering program are the Applied Energy Research Laboratory (AERL), the Precision Engineering 
Laboratory (PEC) and the Industrial Assessment Center (lAC). 

Opportunities 

Aerospace: The Aerospace Engineering undergraduate curriculum includes a variety of courses that provide the student with 
knowledge of aerodynamics, aerospace materials, structures, propulsion, flight mechanics, and vehicle stability and control plus 
knowledge of selected topics in orbital mechanics, space environment, attitude determination and control, telecommunications, space 
structures, and rocket propulsion. The program educate students to define, formulate, and solve complete aerospace engineering 
problems in aeronautics and astronautics, to function on multi-disciplinary teams, to communicate effectively and to integrate 
pertinent technical areas to meet a stated objective through the use of trade-off studies and compromises to satisfy the quality and 
integration objectives. In addition to related industries and industries with similar interests such as automobile design. Aerospace 
Engineering graduates are typical employed by government laboratories such as NASA, NAVAIR, and the Air Force, a wide variety 
of aerospace industries, or they go to graduate school to pursue advanced degrees. 

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Mechanical: Because of the wide range of applications and needs, meciianical engineering is one of the broadest engineering 
disciplines, and thus offers a wide range of employment opportunities. The program provides students with the knowledge and 
experience that equips them to enter a wide range of functional areas, including design, development, manufacturing, plant operation, 
testing and experimentation, consulting, sales and service. Employment may readily be found in industry, government and service 
organizations. Students are also well prepared to enter graduate school to pursue advanced degrees in engineering, science or 
business, as well as professional degree programs such as medicine, accounting and law. 

Curricula 

Because of the close relationship between mechanical and aerospace engineering, both curricula are administered by one department. 
They are nearly the same for the freshman and sophomore years but quite dilTerent in the junior and senior years. Each program is 
designed to provide the student with an understanding of both the science on which the discipline is founded and the applied science 
and technology which characterizes its specific character. In addition the programs provide students with an opportunity to develop 
the skills for applying their acquired know ledge. The aerospace engineering and the mechanical engineering programs, which are 
accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. Graduate 
degrees are also offered (consult the Graduate Catalog). 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: w\v\v.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Educational Objectives 

The objectives of the mechanical and aerospace engineering degree programs are: 

To prepare students to enter into successful careers in the mechanical or aerospace engineering professions, having acquired the 

knowledge and skills to analyze engineering problems and to engage in the creative engineering design process in the areas of 

thermal and mechanical systems or in the areas of aeronautics and astronautics. 

To have developed skills in the basic sciences, mathematics, engineering fundamentals, and engineering design that meet the 

standards of an education in mechanical and aerospace engineering and foster the concepts of integrated engineering teams. 

To have acquired the necessary skills to use the modem computational and experimental technologies of mechanical and 

aerospace engineering. 

To have the necessary background in humanities, social sciences, and contemporary issues to practice the mechanical and 

aerospace engineering profession ethically, responsibly, and with awareness of the impact of the engineering activity in a global 

and societal context. 

To have the exposure theory and advances in engineering practice and research as preparation for opportunities in graduate 

education. 

To have developed the ability to communicate ideas effectively and the desire to seek out further educational opportunities for 

lifelong learning. 

DEPARTMENT OF NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

Burlington Engineering Laboratories, Room 1 10 

phone: (919)515-2301 

www.ne.ncsu.edu 

P. J. Turinsky, Head 

M. A. Bourham. Undergraduate Administrator 

M. S. Yim, Director of Graduate Programs 

Professors: M.A. Bourham, R.P. Gardner, J.G. Gilligan, C.W. Mayo, K.L. Murty. P.J. Turinsky; Research Professor: B.W. Wehring; 
Professors Emeriti: D.J. Dudziak, T.S. Elleman, R.L. Murray, K. Verghese; Adjunct Professors: R.M. Lindstrom, D. McNelis, A. 
Sood, B. Wieland, M.S. Wechsler; Associate Professors: J.M. Doster, M.S. Yim; Assistant Professors: D. Anistratov, O.E. Hankins; 
Associate Professor and Director of Nuclear Reactor Programs: A.I. Hawari; Health Physicist: GD. Wicks; Nuclear Services 
Manager: S. Lassell; Director of Outreach Programs: L. Marshall; Manager of Reactor and Engineering Operations: A. Cook 

Nuclear engineering is concerned with the engineering aspects of the control, release, and utilization of nuclear energy from both 
fission and fusion. Nuclear reactors serve many functions- they serve as heat sources for electric power plants and are the basis of 
radioactive isotopes for a variety of peaceful applications. Nuclear methods are applied in medical diagnosis and treatment, scientific 
research, and the search for new resources. The nuclear engineering program educates individuals in scientific and engineering 
principles essential for effective and productive contributions in industrial, university and government service. 

The Department of Nuclear Engineering maintains its national undergraduate and graduate rankings of 4 and 5 respectively. 

Opportunities 

Nuclear power reactor construction continues with over one hundred reactors operating in the nation, increasing our reliance upon 
nuclear energy as a substitute for energy from fossil fuels. Development of breeder and fusion reactors offers the potential of vast 

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new energy sources. Industrial and medical applications of radiation continue to increase in diverse industries. A demand for nuclear 
engineers exists within the electric power industry and national laboratories, naval reactors, and other industries. According to the 
National Society of Professional Engineers, nuclear engineers are among the top four best compensated of the engineering 
disciplines. 

Scholarships and Awards 

Several special scholarships exist for NC State nuclear engineering students, including the Bechtel, Progress Energy, Duke Energy, 
Eastern Carolinas ANS, Piedmont ANS, Institute for Nuclear Power Operations, and American Nuclear Society scholarships. A 
special department ftind supports scholarships for incoming freshmen and exceptional upperclassmen. NC State nuclear engineering 
students have received special recognition awards at the Undergraduate Research Symposium and have gained national recognition 
by several times receiving the Student Design Award of the American Nuclear Society. NC State nuclear engineering students are 
also frequent recipients of nationally awarded fellowships. 

Facilities 

Facilities for nuclear education include a nuclear research reactor (PULSTAR), which can be operated at a steady state power of 1 
MW; the Scaled Pressurized Water Reactor facility (SPWR), an operating 1/9 scale mode of a nuclear power plant; radiation 
detectors and multi-channel analyzers; nuclear materials laboratory; thermal hydraulic laboratory; prompt gamma facility; neutron 
radiography unit; numerous computer facilities including graphic terminals, numerous departmental computer workstations, several 
College of Engineering EOS engineering workstations, and microcomputers; plasma generation and diagnostics laboratory, plasma 
science laboratory, and plasma launchers laboratory; neutron activation analysis laboratory, high- and low-level radio-chemistry 
laboratories; reactor simulation laboratory. 

Mission 

The Department of Nuclear Engineering has four primary missions, these being; 

• Provide a quality education at both the undergraduate and graduate levels to students who desire to pursue careers in nuclear 
science and engineering; 

Develop research programs in areas of emphasis related to applications of nuclear science and engineering; 

• Assist industries and government in North Carolina, nationally and internationally in their efforts to apply these nuclear 
technologies to the betterment of the economy and the environment - in a safe, effective, and innovative manner; and 

• Enhance, promote, and utilize the PULSTAR research reactor and associated facilities in an exemplary manner, leading to 
national recognition as a premier 1 MW Nuclear Reactor Program dedicated to research, teaching, and extension. 

Consistent with the Nuclear Engineering Department's mission, the Department of Nuclear Engineering has developed the following 
objectives for undergraduate education. 

1. To prepare students for successful careers in Nuclear Engineering, emphasizing the mastery of engineering fundamentals, 
the ability to solve engineering problems, and the creative process of engineering design. 

2. To instill in students an understanding of the professional and ethical responsibility to perform engineering tasks at a high 
level and to be accountable for the social and environmental impact of engineering practices. 

3. To establish an educational environment in which students participate in cross-disciplinary activities. 

4. To offer a curriculum that provides students the opportunity to become broadly educated engineers and life-long learners, 
with a solid background in the basic sciences, engineering sciences, and mathematics. To provide an understanding of, and 
an appreciation for, the humanities and the social sciences. To further provide the written and oral communication skills 
necessary for students to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences, and a desire to seek out further educational 
opportunities. 

5. To expose students to advances in engineering practice and research and to prepare them for opportunities in graduate and 
professional education. 

6. To attain the institutional support and financial resources to recruit, develop, and retain faculty who are committed to the 
educational and research mission of the department and to acquire, maintain, and operate facilities and laboratories 
appropriate to our engineering program. 

Curriculum 

Nuclear engineers work in nuclear systems research, design, development, testing, operation, environmental protection, and 
marketing. The Bachelor of Science program prepares graduates for positions in industry, national laboratories, or for graduate study 
(consult the Graduate Catalog). The curriculum incorporates basic sciences and engineering, with emphasis on mathematics and 
physics, followed by course work in nuclear science and technology. Design concepts are introduced in numerous nuclear 
engineering courses throughout the curriculum to provide an integrated educational experience, capstoned by the senior nuclear 
reactors and radiation systems. 

**Attention is also given to the efficient utilization of energy resources and to the environmental aspects of nuclear energy. 
Computers are widely used throughout the curriculum. 

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The nuclear engineering program, which is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology (ABET), leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Engineering. Advanced undergraduates 
who desire to attend graduate school at NC State and specialize in the areas of Fission, Fusion/Plasma, or Radiological Engineering 
may enter a combined 5-year B.S./MNE professional program or B.S./M.S. combined bachelor/master degree program during their 
senior year which will culminate at the end of their fifth year with both the Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Engineering and the 
Master of Nuclear Engineering or the Master of Science degrees. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Curriculum in Nuclear Engineering, Bachelor of Science 

PAPER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING PROGRAM 

Biltmore Hall, Room 2105 
phone: (919)515-5807 

M. J. Kocurek, Head 

J. A. Heitmann, Director of Undergraduate and Graduate Programs 

(For a list of Faculty, See College of Natural Resources, Department of Wood and Paper Science) 

The wood-based industry of North Carolina, as well as throughout the South, is a vital part of the nation's economy. In terms of the 
dollar value of shipments of wood and paper products, the South leads all regions of the country. North Carolina manufactures more 
wood household furniture than any other state, ranks third in shipment value for all wood and paper products, and is second in the 
number of employees and wages paid. Thus, many opportunities e.xist in North Carolina and other southern states for careers in the 
wood-based industry. 

Curricula in Paper Science and Engineering 

The Paper Science and Engineering curriculum prepares students for careers in the paper industry, which ranks as the fifth-largest 
manufacturing industry in the United States. Science, engineering, and mathematics form the basis for a multidisciplinary approach 
to understanding the fundamental manufacturing principles involved. Students study the technology and engineering of wood pulping 
processes, chemical and by-product recovery systems, and pulp bleaching. In addition, various papermaking operations, such as 
refining, sizing, coating, and drying are studied. These topics along with the chemistry of wood, pulping, and papermaking, and the 
physics of paper as it relates to product characteristics and design form a fundamental core of courses that all students in the 
curriculum take. 

Two concentrations are available emphasizing the different engineering aspects of pulping and papermaking. The Paper Science and 
Engineering concentration provides an extensive background in the pulp and paper manufacturing processes and elective credit hours 
for studies in chemistry, marketing, economics, management or other areas of interest to the student. Greater depth in general 
chemical engineering principles can be obtained from the Chemical Engineering Concentration. Students who have completed the 
Chemical Engineering Concentration in Paper Science and Engineering can, in cooperation with the College of Engineering and with 
an additional semester of study, earn a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering as a second degree. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Paper Science and Engineering, Paper Science & Engineering Concentration 
Paper Science and Engineering. Chemical Engineering Concentration 

Opportunities 

Graduates of this curriculum find opportunities for challenging careers as process engineers, product development engineers, process 
control engineers, chemists, technical service engineers, quality control supervisors, and production supervisors. Design and 
construction engineering companies employ graduates as project engineers, and pulp and paper machinery companies use their 
education and skills for technical service and sales positions. Opportunities for managerial and executive positions are available to 
graduates as they gain experience. 

Summer Internship 

(See College of Natural Resources, Department of Wood and Paper Science) 

Regional Program and Scholarships 

(See College of Natural Resources, Department of Wood and Paper Science) 

Minor in Paper Science and Engineering 

The Paper Science and Engineering Minor is available to all undergraduate students enrolled in the university as degree candidates, 
except Paper Science and Engineering Majors. The minor requires 15 credit hours. Six hours of required courses provide a 
comprehensive overs iew of pulping and papermaking science and technology, including pulping, bleaching, chemical recovery, 
recycled fibers, papermaking, coating, printing, converting, and paper properties. Nine elective hours may be chosen from areas 



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including wood chemistry, wet end chemistry, unit operations, process design and analysis, project management, paper physics, 
process control, or to gain more in depth exposure to the basic pulping, bleaching, and paper making process. 

The Paper Science and Engineering Minor, with its focus on papemiaking science and technology, is intended to be especially 
valuable to students majoring in programs leading to careers in corporate or government positions which would interface with the 
paper and related industries. Students interested in business, scientific or engineering specialties, which may interface with, or are 
employed by these industries will find the minor especially useful. 

Admissions and Certification of Minor 

All undergraduate students enrolled in the university as a degree candidate, other than PSE majors are eligible for admission to the 
PSE minor program. The PSE Minor Adviser will serve as adviser and certify completion of the minor Paperwork for certification 
must be submitted to the minor adviser no later than the registration period for the student's final semester at NCSU. The minor must 
be completed no later than the semester in which the student expects to graduate form his or her degree program. Contact Person: Dr 
John A. Heitmann, Minor Adviser, 2111 Biltmore Hall, (919)515-7711 johnheitmannfencsu.edu 

TEXTILE ENGINEERING PROGRAM 

Textile Building/Centennial Campus, Room 3250 

K. R. Beck, Head, Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science 
J. P. Rust, Associate Head, Director of Undergraduate Programs 
H. S. Freeman, Associate Head, Director of Graduate Programs 

(For a list of Faculty, See College of Textiles, Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science) 

The textile industry is rapidly changing to become a capital intensive, high-technology industry. Applications of computing 
technology, robotics, bio-textiles, and information system technology are commonplace in the modem textile manufacturing facility. 
The Textile Engineering program, which is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology (ABET), leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Textile Engineering. The one degree track 
comprises four concentrations: Machine Design, Chemical Process Design, Textile Product Engineering, and Information Systems 
Design. Additionally, double major programs working with the Department of Chemistry are offered by the Textile Engineering 
program. 

Facilities and Scholarships 

(See College of Textiles, Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science) 

Opportunities 

The TE program offers each student a solid engineering education upon which one can build a successful professional career in a 
wide range of professional job flinctions. These include Information Systems Engineer, Machine Designer, Product Design Engineer, 
Chemical Process Engineer, R&D Engineer, Technical Management, Plant Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Technical Sales, 
Consulting and others. Textile engineers are employed in a wide variety of industries that include aerospace, automotive, chemical, 
composites, management consulting, fiber processing, medical devices, and textile processing. 

The Textile Engineering Program provides a fijndamental engineering degree with a working knowledge of the very large textile 
industry as well as its allied industries. Our program is designed to graduate approximately 35 students per year; therefore, we have 
small classes that allow you to receive individual attention to help you reach your maximum potential. We have our own career 
placement center to assist students in identifying and selecting jobs. Many of our graduates select jobs that are located in the 
Southeast, but others who desire to work in other regions of the country have opportunities to do so. Our graduates work in the 
biomedical industries in California, the automotive industry in Michigan, the aerospace industry in Texas, as well as the specialty 
fabrics industry in Maryland. 

Curriculum 

The TE program has four curriculum tracks to allow you to tailor a program that fits your specific educational goals. The tracks 
emphasize Information Systems Engineering, Chemical Process Engineer, Machine Design Engineering, and Product Design 
Engineering. Students in the Information Systems Engineering track take Computer Science and Industrial Engineering classes to 
supplement the core TE classes while students in the Machine Design track take Materials Engineering classes. Minors in the 
associated engineering fields are strongly encouraged. Foreign language minors are also encouraged as part of your academic plan. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Curriculum in Textile Engineering. Chemical Processing Concentration 

Curriculum, B.S. in Textile Engineering/M.S. in Management, Chemical Processing Concentration 

Curriculum in Textile Engineering, Infonnation Systems Concentration 

Curriculum, B.S. in Textile Engineering/M.S. in Management, Information Systems Concentration 

Curriculum in Textile Engineering, Machine Design Concentration 

Curriculum, B.S. in Textile Engineering/M.S. in Management, Machine Design Concentration 

Curriculum in Textile Engineering, Product Design Concentration 

Curriculum, B.S. in Textile Engineering/M.S. in Management, Product Design Concentration 

119 



COLLEGE OF 
HUMANITIES AND 
SOCIAL SCIENCES 




106 Caldwell Hall 

NCSU Box 8101 

Raleigh, NC 27695-8101 

phone: (919)515-2467 

fax: (919)515-9419 

e-mail: chassfa ncsu.edu 

www.chass.ncsu.edu 



Linda P. Brady, Dean 

Gail W. O'Brien. Associate Dean, Academic Affairs 

Matthew T. ZingratT, Associate Dean, Research and Fngagement 

Randall J Thomson. Assistant Dean and Director of Undergraduate Programs 

Monica T. Leach, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs and Director ot Diversity Programs 

Michael L. Vasu, Assistant Dean, Information Technology 

Adalia A. "Jessie" Sova, Assistant Dean, Finance and Administration 

Lynda H. Hambourger, Director, Undergraduate Enrollment Management 

Akram F. Khater. Director, International Programs 



College of Humanities and Social Sciences 



The College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers programs of study which lead to baccalaureate and advanced degrees in the 
disciplines of the humanities and social sciences. The college also offers courses in these disciplines that are required in all 
undergraduate programs. In this way the university provides its students the opportunity to prepare for a full life in the professions 
and occupations that require intellectual flexibility, broad knowledge, and a basic comprehension of human beings and their 
problems. 

CHASS is comprised of nine departments: Communication, English, Foreign Languages and Literatures, History, Philosophy and 
Religion, Political Science and Public Administration. Psychology, Social Work, and Sociology and Anthropology (also a department 
in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences). Interdisciplinary programs are administered through Academic Affairs in the 
CHASS Dean's Office. 

The college offers undergraduate majors in: anthropology; arts applications; communication; criminology; English; French; history; 
multidisciplinary studies; philosophy; political science; psychology; religious studies; science, technology and society; social work; 
sociology; and Spanish. In addition, special options or concentrations are available within some of the major programs: 



Anthropology 

American Politics 
International Politics 
Law and Justice 
Public Policy 



Communication 

Communication Disorders 
Communication Media 
Public & Interpersonal Communication 
Public Relations 



English 

Creative Writing 
Language & Literature 
Language. Writing and Rhetoric 
Teacher Education 
World Literature 



Philosophy 

Philosophy of Law 

Political Science 

Applied Anthropology 



Psychology 

Human Resource 
Development 

A Teacher Education Option is available in English, French. Spanish, and social studies (history, political science and sociology). 

Degrees granted include the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science. Bachelor of Social Work, Master of Arts, Master of Fine Arts, 
Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy, as well as professional degrees in political science and sociology. 

CHASS First- Year Seminar Program 

Completion of a CHASS First- Year Seminar is required of all students who enter CHASS with fewer than 15 credit-hours, effective 
in the Fall of 2000. Students entering CHASS with 15 or more credit hours (exclusive of IB or AP credit) are not required to take a 
CHASS First- Year Seminar. 



Academic Minors 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers 38 minors: 



Africana Studies 
American Literature 
Anthropology 
Arts Studies 
Chinese Studies 
Classical Greek 
Classical Studies 
Cognitive Science 
Creative Writing 
Criminology 
English 
Environmental Science 



Film Studies 

French 

German 

Health, Medicine & Human Values 

History 

International Studies 

Italian Studies 

Japan Studies 

Japanese 

Journalism 

Law and Justice 

Linguistics 

Music 



Philosophy 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Religious Studies 

Russian Studies 

Science, Technology, and Society 

Social Work 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Technical and Scientific Communication 

Theatre 

Women's and Gender Studies 

World Literature 



Dual Degree Programs 

Jefferson Scholars in Agriculture and the Humanities 

The Thomas Jefferson Scholars Program in Agriculture and the Humanities is a joint program of the College of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. It is a dual degree which permits participants to have two 
concentrations: one in an area of agriculture/life sciences and one in an area of humanities/social sciences. The dual degree program 
may be individually designed to meet each student's particular interests and career goals. The purpose of the program is to produce 



121 



College of Humanities and Social Sciences 



potential leaders in agriculture and the life sciences who have not only technical expertise but also an appreciation for the social, 
political, and cultural issues that atVect decision-making. 

Each spring a number of entering freshmen are chosen to receive scholarships to participate in the Jefferson program. In addition, 
other qualified students may choose to pursue a dual major under the Jefferson program. 

Students interested in applying to the Jefferson Scholars program should contact Dr. Kenneth Esbenshade, Associate Dean, College 
of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Bo.x 7642, North Carolina State University. Raleigh, NC 27695 (919)515-2615 before January 15. 

Da Vinci Scholars Program 

The DaVinci Scholars Program is a joint program between the College of Humanities and Social Sciences and the College of Design. 
Students completing the DaVinci Scholars program will earn two degrees within five or six years: a bachelor's degree in one of the 
five undergraduate disciplines in the College of Design and a B.A. or B.S. degree in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. 
DaVinci Scholars will earn their first degree in design with no adjustment in their design requirements. They will elect a second 
major from any of those available in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, including multidisciplinary studies. They must 
meet all requirements for both degrees. 

The primary purpose of the dual degree program is to provide students with a strong liberal education as a complement to their 
professional degree study. In some cases, however, students will also improve their employment opportunities by selecting study that 
directly supports their profession in design. For example, students majoring in graphic design who take a second degree that focuses 
on writing improve their opportunities for employment in communications. A student in architecture with a second degree in history 
may improve opportunities for graduate study in architectural history, preservation, or urban planning. Study of foreign language may 
improve opportunities for international design practice. 

Students who wish to participate in the DaVinci Scholars should apply to the Associate Dean of the College of Design within their 
first semester of study in the College of Design and by the time of formal declaration of major in their second semester of study. 
DaVinci Scholars will participate in special programs and meet as a group for regular discussions and advising. Interdisciplinary 
seminars led by College of Design and College of Humanities and Social Sciences faculty will focus on issues relevant to the nature 
of the disciplines. Other programs may include lectures and field trips. Depending on the availability of the funds. DaVinci scholars 
will receive scholarships toward participation in the program. 

Benjamin Franklin Scholars Program 

A limited number of freshmen in the College of Engineering are selected to participate in the Benjamin Franklin Scholars program. 
In addition to their major courses, each Benjamin Franklin Scholar develops an individualized, five-year plan of work focused on a 
central theme in the humanities and social sciences. Students completing the program receive a Bachelor of Science degree in an 
engineering discipline or computer science and a bachelor's degree in multidisciplinary studies. 

This dual degree program, a joint undertaking of the College of Engineering and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, 
provides a unique opportunity to integrate a solid base of knowledge in technology or science with the broad philosophical 
perspective of the humanities. The curriculum for the dual degree program has four main components: a strong general education, 
specially designed interdisciplinary and problem-defining courses, all technical course requirements associated with the engineering 
or computer science degree, and a 30-hour multidisciplinary concentration designed by students in consultation with their advisers. 
With careful planning, this program can be completed in five years. 

For more information, contact the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs, College of Engineering, 1 1 8 Page Hall, or the Assistant 
Dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, 106 Caldwell Hall. 

.4lexander Hamilton Scholars Program 

The Alexander Hamilton Scholars Program permits students to earn a B.A. in Multidisciplinary Studies emphasizing international 
studies and a B.S. in Accounting, a B.S. in Business Management, or a B.A. in Economics. The B.A. in Multidisciplinary Studies is a 
specially designed program focusing on a specific region of the world and one of its major languages. Students may choose from the 
following regions: China or Japan and the Pacific Rim, France or Germany and Western Europe, Francophonic Africa, Latin 
America, and the Middle East. 

Key elements of the Alexander Hamilton Program include at least three semesters of foreign language study beyond the level 
required for admission to the university, at least two courses in history, political science, literature, or anthropology directed 
specifically at the region of study, a management capstone course (business policy and strategy or economics seminar) with a strong 
global orientation, and several additional courses on topics such as international relations, global affairs, and intercultural 
communication. Each Hamilton scholar is required to complete at least one field experience lasting a minimum of six weeks which 
will provide immersion in the language and culture of the student's focus region. 

Hamilton scholars will participate in special programs throughout their enrollment that are designed to increase their exposure to 
leading-edge management practices, international business, and foreign cultures. These programs will include activities such as 
special lectures and seminars, corporate tours and field trips, and scholar's banquets. For additional information about the Alexander 
Hamilton Scholars Program, contact the Associate Dean for Academic AtTairs, College of Management, 1 12 Nelson Hall, or the 
Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, 106 Caldwell Hall. 

Gifford Pinchot Scholars Program 

The Gifford Pinchot Scholars Program, a joint program with the College of Natural Resources, follows the mode established by other 
dual degree programs. Academically talented students are invited to pursue simultaneously a B.S. degree in Forest Management 

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College of Humanities and Social Sciences 



through the College of Natural Resources and a B.A. degree in a major in Humanities and Social Sciences. The Pinchot Scholars 
Program is limited to a small number ( 10 or fewer per year) of highly qualified and motivated students. Scholarship support is 
available to some participants in the Pinchot Scholars Program. 

Pinchot Scholars follow the requirements for the B.S. in Forest Management (with one exception: the physics sequence PY 21 1-212 
is not required.) For the B.A. degree, they follow a 30-hour major concentration in multidisciplinary studies. Included in this major 
are two core requirements: MDS 340 Perspectives in Agricultural History (3 credits) and MDS 498 Senior Thesis (3 credits). 
Participants also complete an additional multidisciplinary studies seminar ( 1 credit). In addition, Pinchot Scholars complete all the 
general education requirements for a B.A. degree in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. A total of 155 credit hours are 
required for the double degree, which students can complete in four and a half years. 

The theme of the multidisciplinary studies major will involve placing forest management in the context of cross-cultural perspectives, 
global issues, and public policy. The exact set of courses that will constitute the major will be determined by students in consultation 
with their advisory group, subject to the approval of the Multidisciplinary Studies Committee. Each student is assigned an advisory 
group consisting of an academic adviser from each college, plus a mentor from the forest industry. Pinchot Scholars also participate 
in existing cooperative activities with other dual degree program scholars. For more information, contact the Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs, College of Natural Resources, 1022-N Biltmore, Box 8001, or the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Academic 
Affairs, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, 106 Caldwell, Box 8101. 

Eli Whitney Dual Degree Program in Textiles and International Studies 

This joint program between the College of Textiles and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences allows a student to earn a B.S. 
in Textile and Apparel Management and a B.A. in Multidisciplinary Studies with a concentration in international studies. This dual 
degree is designed to prepare students for work in the increasingly international textile industry. The program includes all the 
technical course requirements associated with the textile and apparel management degree. For the B.A. in Multidisciplinary Studies, 
students choose from among three areas of concentration: the Pacific Rim (language study in Japanese or Chinese), Latin America 
(language study in Spanish), or Europe (language study in German or Italian). The program, which takes four to five years to 
complete, also includes possible overseas internships. Merit scholarship awards are available for high-achieving students who 
participate in the dual degree program in textiles and international studies. For more information, contact Dr. Helmut Hergeth, Textile 
Management and Technology, 3318 Textile Building, (919)515-6574 or the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Academic Affairs, 
College of Humanities and Social Sciences, 106 Caldwell Hall, (919)515-2468. 

Cooperative Education 

Cooperative Education in humanities and social sciences seeks to broaden the student's intellectual horizons and at the same time to 
provide an introduction to the world of business, industry, government, or finance in preparation for a career after graduation. In this 
program, the freshman and senior years are usually spent on campus while the sophomore and junior years are devoted either to 
alternate periods of on-campus study and full-time work experience or part-time work and study on a continuous basis. The student is 
paid for work experiences by the employer. Ordinarily the program takes five years to complete, but those who are willing to attend 
summer school or take on a summer co-op assignment can finish in four years. Transfer students are eligible, and all interested 
students are urged to apply early in the academic year. The program is also open to graduate students although less time is required on 
work assignments. 

Further information may be obtained from Cooperative Education, 300 Clark Hall, or at (919)515-4425. 

Honors Program 

Each department in the College offers an honors program designed to encourage outstanding students to develop their intellectual 
potential to the fullest extent possible through individualized study, special seminars, and close association with faculty members in 
their major field. 

Scholarships 

In addition to the university-wide awards available, the College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers a number of need-based 
and non-need scholarships. 

For further information contact Lynda H. Hambourger, Director of Undergraduate Enrollment Management, College of Humanities 
and Social Sciences, North Carolina State University, Box 8101, Raleigh, NC 27695-8101. 

Folger Institute 

North Carolina State University is a member of the Folger Institute of Renaissance and Eighteenth-Century Studies, a unique 
collaborative enterprise sponsored by the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C., and 20 universities in the Middle Atlantic 
region. Each year the institute offers an interdisciplinary program in the humanities— seminars, workshops, symposia, coUoquia, and 
lectures. Admission is open to faculty and students of North Carolina State University, and a limited number of fellowships are 
available through the campus Folger Institute Committee. 



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College of Humanities and Social Sciences 



Curricula 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg records/curricula 
Bachelor of Arts Program 
Bachelor of Science Program 

INTERDISCIPLINARY DEGREES 

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Multidisciplinary Studies 

The Multidisciplinary Studies program allows students to design their own academic majors. Instead of following the requirements 
for a major in one of the traditional disciplines, the candidate for the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree in 
Multidisciplinary Studies has the responsibility of organizing a concentration or field of specialization from one or more disciplines. 

The freshman and sophomore basic requirements for the multidisciplinary studies programs are the same as for the other Bachelor of 
Arts and Bachelor of Science programs in humanities and social sciences. In satisfying basic requirements in language, humanities, 
social science, mathematics, and natural science, students should, whenever possible, choose those courses that are most appropriate 
as background for the courses in their major concentrations. 

To become candidates for a self-designed major in multidisciplinary studies, students must first get applications forms and 
information from the CHASS Dean's Office and then prepare a tentative proposal which includes a list of courses comprising 30 
credit hours for the B.A. and 27 credit hours for the B.S. and an essay of 500 words explaining the reasons for making this set of 
courses the field of specialization. The student's proposal is reviewed by a faculty sponsor and submitted to the Multidisciplinary 
Studies Degree Committee for consideration. 

After a thorough examination to determine whether the set of courses proposed as a multidisciplinary major is academically sound 
and coherent, the committee will approve the proposal or suggest specific improvements. 

Bachelor of Arts in Arts Applications 

The Arts Applications program, which allows students to develop a foundation in one of the arts (film, music, theater, or visual art), 
and on that foundation, learn the social or technological applications of the arts in a modem world. Examples are computers and the 
arts, scientific illustration, arts management, and arts education. 

Students take 21 hours in foundation courses, 6 hours in linking courses, (such as computers and music or arts and politics), a 3 hours 
capstone course (ARS 494) designed for Arts Applications majors, and an advised elective to support their particular interests and 
career objectives. To enroll in the program, students should apply at the CHASS Dean's Office, 106 Caldwell. 

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Science, Technology, and Society 

STS is an interdisciplinary field of study that seeks to explore and understand the many ways that modem science and technology 
shape modem culture, values, and institutions, and how modem values shape science and technology. Students may obtain a B.A. or 
B.S. degree in this field. 

Students complete an introduction to the field, four advanced courses, a four-course student-designed specialty, and a capstone 
course, along with two co-requisite courses. To apply, students should contact the CHASS Dean's Office, 106 Caldwell. 

Honors Program 

The Honors Program in Interdisciplinary Studies provides able students the opportunity to integrate the various strands of their 
concentrations in a capstone project. The program also provides a context in which students can sharpen their thinking on the unique 
challenges and opportunities of interdisciplinary work. 

To be admitted into the IDS Honors Program, students must have eamed nine credit hours in an IDS major, have an overall GPA of 
3.25 and a major GPA of 3.25. 

To graduate with Honors in IDS, students must have a GPA of 3.25. and must have completed the IDS capstone course, "independent 
Studies for IDS Students" with a grade of B+ or better, and have eamed six additional credit hours in courses that are both Honors 
courses and also part of their IDS majors. 

Minor in Africana Studies 

The minor in Africana Studies provides a comparative and interdisciplinary study of the Black experience in Africa and the 
Americas. Three required courses include an Introduction to African-American Studies (IDS 240). Black American Literature (ENG 
248). and Afro-American History (HI 372 or 373). Two elective courses may be selected from a list of designated courses in such 
disciplines as anthropology, history, language, sociology, social work, and communication. The minor is designed to bring together 
students from diverse backgrounds and curricula who share a common interest in the African American experience. 



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Minor in Arts Studies 

The Minor in Arts Studies is open to all undergraduate majors in the university. This interdisciplinary minor is designed to enrich the 
student's university experience, to serve as a foundation for learning and understanding the arts beyond the university years, and to 
stimulate intellectual development in ways that may reinforce or complement the objectives of the student's major. This minor 
provides the student with a ftindamental understanding of the historical, theoretical, and practical disciplines of the arts. 

A total of eighteen credit hours must be taken to complete this minor. Students interested in the minor should refer to the Arts Studies 
courses listed under "Arts Studies" in the course description section of this catalog. These courses are described in detail under their 
departmental prefixes. 

Minor in Environmental Science 

The Environmental Science Minor provides a pathway for students from all disciplines to acquire a basic understanding of their 
biophysical and socioeconomic environments, and the effects of humankind's activities upon these environments. With this 
knowledge, individuals will be better able to interpret environmental issues that emerge daily, and to influence public and private 
activities that affect the environment. 

The minor consists of 15 credit hours of course work, selected from more than 20 eligible courses subdivided into four groups. To 
complete the minor, a student must take at least one course from each group, plus one additional course. 

Minor in Film Studies 

(See Department of English) The Departments of English, Communication, and Foreign Languages and Literatures offer a Minor in 
Film Studies. The minor provides an introduction to the nature of the film experience, some background in the history of the medium, 
and the opportunity for in-depth study of selected topics. 

Fifteen hours of course work are required to complete the minor: ENG 282 and either COM 364 or COM 374, plus nine credit hours 
selected from the following: ENG 382, ENG 492, COM 244, COM 364 or 374 (whichever course was not taken to fulfill the 
requirement above), IDS 496, HI 336, and DN 316(prerequisite waived, consent of instructor). Any students taking this minor cannot 
count courses from the minor toward their majors. 

Minor in Health, Medicine, and Human Values 

The Minor in Health, Medicine, and Human Values offers students an opportunity to assess critically a range of issues that are 
fundamental to the health of individuals as well as of society. From such an understanding, students as citizens will be more 
adequately prepared to meet these challenges in both private and public arenas. 

Minor in International Studies 

The International Studies Minor is offered to all students in the university who want to add a significant international dimension to 
their departmental majors. This minor program enables students to explore international topics, issues and research from cross- 
cultural, transnational perspectives. The program will provide some tools that students can use to understand better the global context 
of the modem world and to learn the international dimensions of their chosen fields of study. 

Minor in Science, Technology, and Society 

The Minor in Science, Technology and Society is a fifteen-hour, interdisciplinary minor providing students an opportunity to 
appreciate and understand better the roles that science and technology play in the larger sociocultural context. A goal of the minor is 
to help students develop the ability to order and integrate the diverse aspects of their educations. 

Two essential components of this ability are sensitivity to the moral dimensions of scientific and technological inquiry as affecting 
how people may live or want to live and an appreciation of the practical implications of scientific and technical theory. In addition, 
the Minor in Science, Technology, and Society enables students to increase the breadth of their familiarity with science and 
technology. 

Minor in Women's and Gender Studies 

The Women's and Gender Studies Minor provides all students in the university the opportunity for interdisciplinary study in women's 
and gender issues from a wide variety of cultures, backgrounds, and historical eras. In addition, it introduces the often 
unacknowledged contributions made by women and men in various fields of endeavor through course offerings in nine departments. 
The undergraduate minor helps students to examine common assumptions about gender relations using feminist theory and 
methodologies across disciplinary boundaries. 




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DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION 

Winston Hall, Room 201 
phone: (919)515-2450 

C. A. Smith. Head 

K. Zagacki, Associate Head. Director of Undergraduate Program 

W. J. Jordan, Associate Head. Director of Graduate Program 

S. Stein. Assistant Head. Instructional Technologies 

S. Stallings, Coordinator of Advising 

Professor; R.M. Entman. W.J. Jordan. R.L. Schrag. C.A. Smith; Professors Emeriti: L.R. Camp. W.G. Franklin. C.A. Parker; 
Associate Professors: P.C. Caple. D.A. DeJoy. E.T. Funkhouser. V.J. Gallagher. M. Johnson. R. Leonard. S. Stein. K. Zagacki; 
Associate Professor Emeritus: B.L. Russell: Assistant Professors: K. Albada, D. Dannels, C. Farr, J. Ingram, S. Jackson, J. Jameson, 
J. Kivvanuka-Tondo. J. Macoubrie. J. Storr. S. Wiley; Assistant Professor Emeritus: N.H. Snow; Lecturers: J. Alchediak. J. Heaton, 
C. Pullen. S. Stallings; Instructor: J. Pheloung; Teaching Technician: R. Bell 

The Bachelor of Arts in Communication program provides opportunities for study and training in human communication for 
professionals entering business, industry, non-profit organizations, or government service. Today, many organizations are seeking 
graduates with demonstrated competencies in human communication to fill positions that require constant and skillful contact with a 
wide variety of internal and external publics. Depending on their area of specialization, graduates may find employment 
opportunities as communication consultants, media specialists, trainers, public relations specialists, therapists, or performers. Many 
graduates choose to enter graduate or law school. 

Programs of Study 

The Communication major calls for the successfijl completion of at least 36 semester credit hours of Communication (COM) courses. 
All majors must take COM 230. COM 240. and COM 250 one-at-a-time. in sequence, and earn a "C-" or better in each course. In 
addition, all majors must take COM 1 10 and/or COM 112 (depending upon their concentration). Students select one of the five 
departmental concentrations in which they take the remaining credit hours in the major. The concentrations are: 

Communication Disorders 

The preprofessional curriculum in this concentration prepares students for admission into a graduate program in Speech-Language 
Pathology or Audiology. Coursework covers typical and atypical speech and language development, speech science, the anatomical 
and physiological bases of speech and hearing, and fiindamental diagnostic and intervention procedures employed in a clinical 
context. 

Mediated Communication 

This concentration focuses on the construction, distribution, use. and effects of visual images, sounds, and words conveyed through a 
wide range of communication media, including print, television, the Internet, and emerging technologies. Students create and 
produce media content, and also conduct empirical and critical analyses of issues related to media economics, history and 
development, social and global impact, and public policy. 

Public and Interpersonal Communication 

This concentration investigates analytical, theoretical, and skills approaches to the study of human communication processes and 
problems, including interpersonal relationships, group processes, conflict management, public and political discourse, argumentation, 
persuasion, and ethics. 

Public Relations 

This concentration focuses on the communication theories, methods, principles, and ethical practices used by organizations to 
establish and maintain mutually beneficial relationships with an organization's internal and external publics (such as employees, 
stockholders, and customers). Students are instructed in strategic planning and communication techniques used in a variety of 
organizations, including corporate, government, and non-profit entities. 

Honors Program 

The Honors Program in Communication provides academically talented students an opportunity to expand their curriculum and 
abilities through in-depth, guided study. Candidates for the Program must have achieved junior standing with a TGPA of at least 3.25 
and a minimum GPA in the major of 3.5 after completion of at least nine credits of Communication courses. 

Students admitted to the Program must complete a total of nine credit hours, including an Honors Research Seminar, an independent 
study during which the honors thesis will be written, and on 300-level or higher course in the Department of Communication or 
another department, covering subjects related to the thesis project. Honors students will select and work closely with an honors 
faculty advisor. 

Students seeking to enter the Program must submit a plan of study to the director of the Honors Program for approval. Students who 
complete an approved plan of study meeting the above requirements and graduate with a minimum TGPA of 3.25 and a GPA for 
Communication courses of at least 3.5 will have successfully met the Honors program criteria. Completion of the Program will be 
noted on the student's transcript and diploma, and in the Commencement and Honors Convocation programs. 

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Curriculum Notes 

Students must enroll in COM 230 during their first semester as a Communication major. 

Internal transfers must have completed 15 hours at NC State with a minimum overall GPA of 2.7 to transfer upon request from 

another curriculum to the Communication major. External transfers must have a GPA of 3.0. Students with GPAs less that 2.7 but 

above 2.0, having 60 or fewer hours, and having completed two COM courses may apply for a Waiver of these requirements for 

transfer admission to the major. Two Waiver Application periods are scheduled each year. Contact the department for an 

application form and deadline information. Relatively few students are granted waiver. 

No final grades below "C-" are permitted for courses used in the Communication major. 

To qualify for graduation, each student must have a minimum GPA of 2.0 for all courses completed at NC State, and at least a 2.0 

GPA for all courses taken in the Communication major. The Public Relations Communication Concentration has additional 

requirements. 

Minor in Theatre 

The Department of Communication offers an academic minor in theatre to all NCSU undergraduate degree-seeking students except 
those majoring in Communication. The minor includes a combination of courses from traditional theatre and the communication 
theory curriculums. 

Internships 

The Department operates an Internship Program that offers qualified seniors the opportunity to gain work experience in the 
communication field. The Internship is required of all students in the Public Relations Concentration, but students from the other 
Communication concentrations are also encouraged to participate in this Program. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Tompkins Hall, Rooms 221, 246 
phone: (919)515-3866 

M. H. Thuente, Head 

L. R. Severin, Associate Head, Coordinator of Advising 

B. M. Blackley. Assistant Head for Scheduling 

J. Morillo, Director of Graduate Programs 

A. M. Penrose, Director of First- Year Writing Program 

William C. Friday Distinguished Professor: W.A. Wolfram; Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: A. Davis-Gardner, 
M.T. Hester, L.H. MacKethan; Professors: C. Anson, B.J. Baines, J. Balaban, J.W. Clark, J.Ferster, J.A. Gomez, J.M. Grimwood, C. 
Gross, A.H. Harrison, D. Herman, M.T. Hester, J.J. Kessel, T. Lisk, L.H. MacKethan, C.R. Miller, M.E. Orr, J.O. Pettis, C.A. Prioli, 
A.F. Stein, M.H. Thuente, J.N. Wall Jr.. W. Wolfram, R.V. Young; Professors Emeriti: G.W. Barrax, PE. Blank Jr.. L.S. Champion, 
J.D. Durant, M. Halperen, L.T. Holley, H.G. Kincheloe, A.S. Knowles, B.G Koonce, D.L. Laryea, F.H. Moore, J.J. Smoot. H.C. 
West, M.C. Williams, P Williams Jr.; Associate Professors: W. Bamhardt, M.R Carter, D.H. Covington, A.M. Davis-Gardner, S. 
Dicks, N. Halpem, S.B. Katz, S.M. Katz, R.C. Kochersberger, D.L. Laryea, L. May, J.D. Morillo, C. Nwankwo, A.M. Penrose, M. 
Pramaggiore, S. Setzer, L.R. Severin, K. Shepherd-Barr, S. Smith-McKoy, E. Thomas, J.F. Thompson, H.C. West, D.B. Wyrick; 
Assistant Professors: A. Baker, B. Bennett, A. Bolonyai, C.J. Cobb, E.A. Hariston, P. LaCoste-Lynn, D. Orgerou, M. Orgerou, D. 
Rieder, J. Swartz, C. Warren; Senior Lecturer: P.R. Cockshutt. 

The Department of English offers basic and advanced courses in writing, language, and literature. The freshmen course required of 
all undergraduate student develops skill in expository writing and in analytical reading. Advanced courses in writing available to all 
students cover a variety of areas, including journalism, technical and business writing, and creative writing. These courses give 
students opportunities to pursue special personal and career interests, as do courses in literature, linguistics, film, and folklore. 

The department offers a Bachelor of Arts major in English with five options: creative writing; language and literature; language, 
writing, and rhetoric; world literature; and teacher education. It also offers a Bachelor of Science major. Internships available to 
qualified students provide practical experience as well as an understanding of how academic studies are relevant to the workplace. 

In addition, the department offers three graduate degrees: a Master of Arts in English, a Master of Science in Technical 
Communication, and a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing. (See Graduate Catalog for details.) A five-course certificate program 
in Professional Writing, available to students not seeking a degree at NC State, offers preparation in practical writing and editing, 
including both journalism and technical writing. 

Opportunities 

A degree in English provides both liberal education and practical knowledge about the role of writing and language in the everyday 
world. It leads to careers in such fields as teaching, journalism, advertising, public relations, personnel management, technical 
writing, business writing, and creative writing. It sharpens the analytical and interpretive skills needed for professional and 
managerial careers, and it serves as an excellent preparation for students planning to study law or medicine and for those intending to 
do graduate work in literature and rhetoric. 

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English Honors Program 

The Honors Program in English provides courses that enrich the intellectual life of the English major. The Honors student contributes 
to and learns from seminar settings, takes up the obligation of independent study, produces documents representing sustained and 
logically articulated research practices, and earns recognition for excellent work beyond ordinary requirements. 

For admission, students must have a minimum GPA of 3.25 and must have completed at least three English courses above the 
freshman level with a minimum GPA of 3.25. Successful completion of the Honors Program requires completion of 9 hours of honors 
courses with grades of A or B, a GPA of at least 3.25 in NC State English courses, and a minimum overall GPA of 3.25. 

Bachelor of Arts in English 

Major in English, Language and Literature Concentration 

This curriculum provides a strong general education with an emphasis on the study of the English language and of British and 
American literature. It leads to a broad range of careers in education, business, government, law, etc. The major includes 36 hours of 
English courses beyond freshman composition, nine courses that satisfy categorical requirements and three elective English courses. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Major in English, Creative Writing Concentration 

The student must schedule 36 hours beyond freshman composition. Within these hours, students must take eighteen hours of 
literature (including the CHASS six hours), six hours of linguistics, rhetoric or writing practice, and 12 hours of creative writing 
electives. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg records/curricula 

Major in English, World Literature Concentration 

The Lawrence Rudner Concentration in World Literature provides a strong general education in the humanities while enabling 
students to study literature in a global context by mixing courses in English and American literature with courses in foreign-language 
literatures. It prepares for a broad range of post-graduate options, including graduate and professional school, and a wide variety of 
careers in business, education, government, and law. It is especially appropriate for students intending to pursue careers in 
international relations. Students must schedule 36 hours beyond freshman composition. The 36 hours include two courses in rhetoric, 
linguistics and writing practice; nine courses that meet categorical requirements in historical periods, cultural regions, and literary 
modes; and one elective course in literature. At least 18 of these hours must consist of ENG or ENG/FL courses; at least 12 of them 
must consist of FL or ENG/FL courses. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Major in English, Language, Writing, and Rhetoric Concentration 

This curriculum provides a strong general education, a basic exposure to literature, and an emphasis on the study of written English in 
its theoretical, cultural, and practical applications. It can lead to a broad range of professions, with a special focus on careers that 
involve creating, designing and producing documents: the news media, business and technical communication, the writing and 
publishing professions. Students may also focus their studies upon rhetoric, composition, and linguistics and prepare for graduate 
study in these areas or for law school, teaching, and other professions. Students must schedule 36 hours of English courses beyond 
freshman composition, including 6 hours of CHASS literature electives, 15 hours from the English core, and 15 hours from a focused 
distribution of courses specially designed for LWR majors. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Major in English, Concentration in Teacher Education 

English majors may enroll in the Teacher Education Concentration offered by the College of Humanities and Social Sciences in 
cooperation with the College of Education. Students who complete this program are eligible to apply for certification to teach English 
in secondary schools in North Carolina. The requirements of this program include 25 semester hours in professional courses and 36 
semester hours in English beyond freshman composition (total 125 credit hours required for graduation). Admission to the program 
requires the joint permission of the English department and the College of Education. Formal applications are required for Admission 
to Teacher Education Candidacy and Admission to the Professional Semester. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Bachelor of Science in English 

The Bachelor of Science in English provides students v\ ith a broad but structured foundation in both the sciences and in language and 
literature. It requires 30 hours of English requirements, plus a 1 5-hour science/technology option. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Minor in American Literature 

The Department of English otTers a minor in .American Literature to NC State students, except for LAN and LIT English majors. The 
minor consists of any five courses in American literature, three of which must be at the 300 level or above, and one of which must be 

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at the 400 level or above. Students may transfer in no more than six hours toward the minor. This minor will focus on the English 
language literature of the United States and of the British colonies out of which the United States emerged. 

Minor in Creative Writing 

A minor in Creative Writing is available from the English Department for NC State students, except LCW English majors. 

Minor in English 

The English Department offers a minor in English to majors in any field except English. The minor program will allow students to 
pursue general interests in writing, literature, and language. 

Minor in Film Studies 

The Departments of English, Communication, and Foreign Languages and Literatures offer a minor in Film Studies open to students 
across the university. The minor provides a comprehensive introduction to the art and industry of the cinema through courses in film 
analysis, history, theory, criticism, screen writing, and production. 

Minor in Journalism 

The Department of English and the Department of Communication offer a minor in Journalism to NC State students, except LWR 
English majors. The minor will provide course work in writing and editing news and features for print and non-media as well as an 
introduction to the profession of journalism. 

Minor in Linguistics 

The Department of English and the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures offer a minor in Linguistics to NC State 
students, except LWR English majors. The minor is designed to investigate the structure and function of language as a cognitive and 
behavioral science. Five courses in designated areas of linguistics are required in the minor. Among students likely to be attracted to 
this minor are those who expect to pursue graduate study in linguistics, those interested in foreign languages or English as a second 
language, and those interested in communication sciences. 

Minor in Technical and Scientific Communication 

A minor in Technical and Scientific Communication is available from the English Department for NC State students, except LWR 
majors, who are interested in supplementing their studies in technical, scientific, or other academic fields with strong writing and 
communication skills. Students minoring in Technical and Scientific Communication will be introduced to numerous genres 
including internal and external documents such as proposals, reports, science writing, users guides, reference manuals, and online 
documentation. Critical perspectives towards the role of communication in the creation of scientific and technical knowledge will be 
examined. The minor may lead to career opportunities in technical and scientific writing and communication. 

Minor in World Literature 

In keeping with the university's mission to provide an international curriculum, the World Literature minor offers NC State students, 
except for LAN and LIT English majors, an opportunity to broaden their perspectives on foreign cultures through the study of 
literature outside the Anglo-American tradition. Students will also develop critical, analytical, and linguistic skills essential in today's 
job market. The minor offers choices from a range of courses in literature, in translation or in the original language, from Europe, 
Asia, Africa, and Latin America. World Literature courses are cross-listed in the Department of English and the Department of 
Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 

1911 Building, Room 117 
phone: (919)515-2475 

R. V. Gross, Head 

D. M. Marchi, Associate Head 

A. B. Kennedy, Coordinator of Advising 

Professors: T.R Feeny, Y.B. Rollins, M.L. Sosower, M.A. Witt; Professors Emeriti: M. Paschal, J. Kelly, E.M. Stack; Associate 
Professors: V. Bilenkin, H.G. Braunbeck, G.A. Dawes, M.M. Magill, A.C. Malinowski, D.M. Marchi, J. P. Mertz, M.L. Salstad; 
Associate Professors Emeriti: R.A. Alder, V.M. Prichard, S.E. Simonsen, H.Tucker Jr.; Assistant Professors: L.M. Barovero, M.L. 
Darhower, J.S. Despain, H.A. Jaimes, J. Mari, E. Tai, E.L. Vilches; Lecturers: D.F. Adler, T.P. Brody, A.B. Kennedy, S. Navey-Davis, 
H. Young. 

Opportunities 

The expansion of international relations makes the knowledge of foreign languages a critical need for today's professional. The 
student of foreign languages is not limited to teaching, translating or interpreting. There are careers in politics, diplomacy, commerce, 
business, agriculture, science, and research in which a thorough knowledge of foreign languages is crucial for success. The demand 
for multilingual personnel extends to all fields of human enterprise and will continue to grow in the coming years. 

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Bachelor of Arts in French or Spanish 

All the general requirements for Bachelor of Arts degree must be met. Degree designations are B.A. in French Language and 
Literatures, B.A. in Spanish Language and Literature, B.A. in French Language and Literature with Teacher Education option, and 
B.A. in Spanish Language and Literature with Teacher Education Option. 

Outstanding students may become members of the Alpha Lambda chapter of Phi Sigma lota. National Foreign Languages Honor 
Society or of the Sigma Delta Pi, National Hispanic Honor Society. A department honors program in French and Spanish is also 
available to eligible students. 

Major in French or Spanish 

Students must complete 36 hours beyond the 201 level, including a senior seminar/capstone course. Majors must take 12 additional 
hours of advised electives. These are waived for students who choose to double major (in Business Management or Political Science, 
for example), and for those who choose the Teacher Education Option. 

Major in French or Spanish with Teacher Education Option 

In collaboration with the College of Education and the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, the Department of Foreign 
Languages and Literatures offers a program leading to a French or Spanish teaching license in North Carolina, grades K-12. 

The requirements of the program include 30 semester hours in professional education classes and 39 semester hours in French and 
Spanish beyond the 102 level. Candidates must consult with their academic adviser as early as possible for the proper planning of 
their curriculum. Application for admission to teacher education candidacy is made during the Spring Semester of the sophomore 

year. 

Honors Program 

The Honors Program in Foreign Languages and Literatures assists academically talented majors to realize their fullest potential as 
undergraduates in the tleld. To participate, students must have an overall GPA of 3.25 and a departmental GPA of 3.25 after 9 hours 
in the major. Successful completion of the program requires an overall GPA of 3.25, with 9 hours of Honors work, at least 6 of them 
in Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

Students will extend their critical thinking skills, refine foreign languages skills, and discover significant scholarly areas of particular 
interest to them through various avenues, such as: Honors options in regular classes, in which students explore the material in greater 
depth or breadth; development and execution of an independent project, assisted by a faculty mentor and; an approved study abroad 
project. Completion of departmental Honors is noted on the student's transcript and at Commencement. 

Programs Abroad 

Summer study programs are offered in France, India, Mexico, Spain, and Peru. 

Minors in Foreign Language, Literatures, and Cultures 

Minor programs in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures include courses in language, literature, and civilization. The 
minor program requires 15 hours of study in Chinese, classical Greek, classical studies, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian, 
or Spanish. 

Undergraduate students majoring in any area of study at NC State are eligible to minor in a foreign language. Students may not, 
however, major and minor in the same language. 

ESL at NC State 

The English as a Second Language program serves the academic and professional language needs of international university students. 
Courses are designed to help both undergraduate and graduate students perfect their language skills. The English Placement Test may 
be required for new students. Check with the ESL section for details. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

Harrelson Hall, Room 162 
phone: (919)515-2483 

J. K. Ocko, Head 

D. A. Zonderman, Associate Head 

J. E. Crisp, Assistant Head 

K. P. Vickery, Director of Undergraduate Advising 

A. W. Mitchell, Director of Graduate Programs 

D. P. Gilmartin. Director of the Honors Program 

J. D. Smith. Director of the Public Histor> Program 

Professors: J.R. Banker, C.H. Carlton, A.J. DeGrand, D.R Gilmartin. W.C. Harris, O.J. Kalinga, A.J. LaVopa. J.K. Ocko, S.T. Parker, 
R.S. Sack. R.W. Slatta, E.D. Sylla, K.S. Vincent; Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: J.M. Riddle; Graduate Alumni 
Distinguished Professor: J.D. Smith; Associate Professors: R.S. Bassett. H. Brewer. J.E. Crisp, A.F. Khater. W.A. Jackson, M.G Kim, 

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W.C. Kimler, K.P. Luria, S. Middleton, A.W. Mitchell, S.L. Spencer, G. Surh, P. Tyler, K.P. Vickery, D.A. Zonderman; Assistant 
Professors; M. Allen, D.R. Ambaras, B.M. Kelley; Adjunct Professor: J. Crow; Adjunct Assistant Professors; W. Atkins, V.L. Berger, 
J. Caddell, B. Cain, A. Daniel, J.R. Lankford Jr.; Visiting Assistant Professor; N. Gustke; Professors Emeriti; B.F. Beers, M.L. 
Brown, M.S. Downs, R.W. Greenlaw, J.P. Hobbs, D.E. King, L.O. McMurry, M.E. Wheeler, B.W. Wishy. 

The History Department at NC State brings alive the treasure of human experience and cultures, from the ancient near East to the 
post-Cold War world, from Shang China to Mandela's Africa, from the Roman senate to the US Senate. We are particularly strong in 
the history of race relations, law and society, and history of science and technology, but we maintain a diversity of scholarly fields 
and have a strong record of publications, grant and fellowship awards, and public outreach. 

History melds personal experience with the human experience and the wisdom of earlier ages. Through dialogue with the past. 
History deepens and enriches our appreciation of the present. History graduates will be better informed and more sophisticated about 
the world and their place in it than more specialist majors. We provide general skills of information gathering and analysis that are 
translatable into a variety of careers and professions in an information age economy. Our students can be expected to have the 
intellectual, social, and cultural flexibility needed to cope with a rapidly changing work world. 

History teaches that understanding a situation requires identifying with people who lived in other times and places. History is a 
discipline whose very method seeks and applies fair and appropriate norms to understand and judge human behavior. Students will 
learn to exercise independent judgment as well as to tolerate differences. 

We encourage students to develop their own interests; our clusters focus on such topics as the History of Science and Technology and 
the History of Law and Society. 

We offer a several undergraduate majors, a minor, the M.A. in History, and the M.A. in Public History. The departmental Honors 
Program provides a guided experience in independent research. Outstanding History students are eligible for membership in Phi 
Alpha Theta, the national history honor society. 

Opportunities 

There are many reasons to major in History. History teaches us how to put forward the best argument based on the known facts. That 
is one reason it provides such an excellent preparation for the study of law. About 1/5 of our graduates go on to pursue teaching 
careers. But training in gathering all the relevant facts and developing the most persuasive explanation has application in business, 
government, journalism, and all the other professions. 

Honors Program 

The departmental honors program allows selected students to pursue intensive individually directed work in history. Students are 
invited to enter the honors program (usually in the junior year). Students must take 9 hours of individual, directed study (HI 498, 495, 
496) leading toward the writing of an Honors Thesis. Students must also take an extra history seminar (HI 491) and participate for 
two-semesters in a non credit honors reading seminar. 

Majors in History 

Bachelor of Arts in History (LAH) 

Requires 30 hours of history course work (in addition to the 6 hours required of all College of Humanities & Social Sciences majors), 
including the HI 300 and HI 491 seminars. At least 24 of the 30 hours must be at the 400 level, and 9 of the 24 must come from three 
groups; pre-modem and non-western history (3); European history (3); and American history (3). This degree allows 33 hours of free 
electives for a total of 122 hours. History courses are scheduled in order to make possible the completion of the B.A. degree by 
evening attendance. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online; www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Bachelor of Arts, Teaching Option in History & Social Studies (LTH) 

Students who complete this program are eligible for certification to teach social studies and history in secondary schools in North 
Carolina and most other states. Students are required to take professional courses in education and psychology and additional social 
science courses. 

The degree requires 30 hours of history course work, including the HI 300 and HI 491 seminars, plus 12 additional hours of social 
science coursed from a prescribed list and 25 hours of professional courses in education and psychology. The degree is completed 
with 120 hours and includes no free electives. Contact Professor Ken Vickery. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online; www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Bachelor of Science in History (LSH) 

The importance of science and technology in our society makes a background in science and technology valuable even for humanities 
majors. The B.S. degree offers a way for students to get both the analytical and writing skills that come from a history major and the 

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technical protlciency that comes with coursewort; in science and engineering. This combination is very helpful in a wide variety of 
careers, including law. business, and public policy. This degree is particularly well suited for students transferring into history from a 
science or engineering major. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

It requires 27 hours of history course work, including the 6 hours required of all College of Humanities & Social Science majors, the 
HI 491 seminar, and at least 4 other courses at the 400 level. HI 300 is highly recommended. This degree allows students to integrate 
a broad base in science and math, specialized study in a single area of science and technology, and a history education. This program 
includes 18 hours of free electives for a total of 122 hours. Contact Professor Ross Bassett. 




Minor in History 

The minor in history is flexible in that it can provide depth to a variety of majors by 
granting a larger historical understanding of a subject. Thus students majoring in 
political science but with a special interest in the Middle East of Europe can gain a 
much deeper understanding of how events in the past have shaped present dilemmas. 
Likewise, those wishing to attend law school can choose from a range of courses in 
legal history. You can tailor the minor to suit your individual interests. History courses 
teach not only background, but also methods of research, analysis, and writing. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

Winston Hall, Room 101 
phone: (919)515-3214 

M. J. Pendlebury, Head 

J. W. Carroll, Assistant Head 

M. K. Cunningham and D.D. Auerbach, Coordinators of Advising 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: W.R. Carter, M.K. Cunningham, T.H. Regan: Professors: W. Adler, W.R. Carter, 
G.L. Comstock, D.M. Jesseph. CM. Pierce, T.K. Stewart; Professors Emeriti: P.A. Bredenberg, R.S. Bryan, T.H. Regan. A.D. 
VanDeVeer; Associate Professors: D.F. Austin, J.W. Carroll, M.K. Cunningham, R.M. Hambourger, T.J. Hinton, B.B. Levenbook, 
H.D. Levin; Associate Professors Emeriti: W.C. Fitzgerald, W.L. Highfill, R.S. Metzger; Assistant Professors: T. Al-Jamil, D.D. 
Auerbach, A.B. Bigelow, J.C. Bivins, M.F. Bykova, R.R Endicott, K.M. McShane, D.N. Schmid. 

Philosophy and Religious Studies confront the most important questions with the most rigorous standards, relying on over two 
millennia of accumulated wisdom from the best minds. They provide excellent training for any line of work where there's value in 
the ability to think straight and express oneself clearly— virtually every line of work. Law school, medical school and other 
professional school admission boards know this. A double major in this department and another (e.g.. political science for law, 
biochemistry for medicine) can make an applicant very attractive to a professional school. Majors receive excellent training for 
graduate school in Philosophy or Religious Studies, as is shown by the department's record in placing graduates in top graduate 
programs in each field. 

The Department of Philosophy and Religion is located online at: www.ncsu.edu/ncsu/chass/philo/ 

Opportunities 

For students interested in postgraduate study, information compiled by post-college professional schools reveals that undergraduate 
majors in philosophy and religion who apply to graduate schools of management have in the past scored extremely well in combined 
total scores on the Graduate Management Admission Test, with exceptional scores on verbal fields. 

Those undergraduate philosophy majors who apply to law schools have been shown to be more likely to be admitted than virtually 
any other field represented. Students intending to study philosophy and religion in graduate programs have consistently scored much 
higher than other students on the verbal section of the Graduate Record Examination. Because of this capability of scoring so well on 
the various postgraduate tests, many businesses and industries welcome philosophy and religion majors into their training programs. 

Philosophy Honors Program 

The honors program in Philosophy offers an enriching and challenging educational experience to qualified majors. 

Admission to the program requires junior standing, completion of nine hours in the major, and a 3.25 GPA overall and in the major. 
Honors students must complete at least nine credit hours of option course work in Philosophy (including PHI 335 and PHI 498) and 
write an honors thesis (PHI 498) to be evaluated by the instructor for PHI 498 and one other member of the Philosophy faculty. 
Graduation requires a 3.25 GPA overall and in the major 



College of Humanities and Social Sciences 



Successful completion of the program is noted on the student's transcript and in the commencement and honors convocation 
programs. 

Religious Studies Honor Program 

The honors program in Religious Studies guides outstanding majors in independent, critical inquiry of the academic study of religion. 

Admission to the program requires junior standing, completion of nine hours in the major, and a 3.25 GPA overall and in the major. 
Honors students must complete at least nine credit hours of honors option course work in Religious Studies (including at least one 
400 level course) and write an honors paper as part of an independent study course (REL 498) which is evaluated by an honors 
committee. 

Graduation requires a 3.25 GPA overall and in the major. Successful completion of the program is noted on the student's transcript 
and in the commencement and honors convocation programs. 

Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies must complete 33 credit hours in the major. The courses in religious studies 
must include one course in Western religious traditions (REL 317, 320, 323, 326, 327); one course in non- Western religious traditions 
(REL 331, 332, 407, 408); one course in Biblical Studies (REL 202, 311, 312, 314; GRK 202); and a minimum of 9 hours of 
advanced studies (REL 402, 407, 408, 460, 481 , 484, 491 *, 496*. 498*). 

*Can be taken twice for credit. 
Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy must complete 27 hours in philosophy, in addition to the three hours in philosophy 
required for all CHASS students. Included are two courses in the development of Western philosophic thought (two of: PHI 300, 301, 
or 302); a course in logic (one of LOG 201 or 335); one course in value theory (one of: PHI 275, 321, 306, 309, 311,313, or 450); one 
course in contemporary philosophy (one of: PHI 330, 33 1 , 332, 333, or 440); one-credit writing courses in each of three core areas of 
philosophy (all of PHI 494, 495, and 496); and four additional LOG or PHI courses. 

Major in Philosophy with a Concentration in Philosophy of Law 

The concentration requires 30 hours, in addition to the three hours of philosophy required of all CHASS students, including PHI 275 
or PHI 321, two advised electives, three core courses (all of: PHI 309, 312, and 313), one course in development of Western 
philosophical thought (one of: PHI 300, 301, or 302), a course in logic or practical reasoning (one of LOG 201, 335, or PHI 250), one 
course in contemporary philosophy (one of: PHI 330, 331, 332, 333, or 440), and one credit writing courses in each of three central 
areas of philosophy (all of PHI 494, 495, and 496). 

Bachelor of Science in Philosophy 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree in Philosophy must complete 27 hours in philosophy, in addition to the three hours in 
philosophy required of all CHASS students. Included are two courses in the development of Western philosophic though (two of: PHI 
300, 301, or 302); a course in logic (one of: LOG 201 or 335); one course in value theory (one of: PHI 275, 321, 306, 309, 311,313, 
or 450); one course in contemporary philosophy (one of: PHI 330, 331, 332, 333, or 440); one course in philosophy of science (one 
of: PHI 340 or 440); one-credit writing courses in each of three core areas of philosophy (all of: PHI 494, 495, and 496); and three 
additional LOG or PHI courses of the student's choice to meet the minimum 30 hours required. 

Minors 

Students wishing to take any of the following academic minors need to complete the departmental form declaring intention to do so. 

Minor in Japan Studies 

Students who take a Minor in Japan Studies are required to complete with a grade of C or better 18 hours of courses distributed as 
follows: Tested language competence through FLJ 202, with at least six hours of Japanese language instruction at NC State at or 
above the FLJ 201 level and four of the following cognate courses: EC 470; ENG/FL 394; HI 263; HI 264; HI 472; PS 342; REL 334. 
With the minor adviser's approval, additional Japan-related classes may be used to fiilfill the cognate course requirement. 

Minor in Cognitive Science 

Students who take a Minor in Cognitive Science must complete 1 5 credit hours with a grade of C or better distributed as follows: Two 
of the three advanced core courses (two of PHI/PSY 425, PSY 420, CSC 411), three additional complementary courses chosen from 
the following list for a total of 15 credits: CSC 312, CSC 333, CSC 411, ENG 210, ENG 324, ENG 524, ENG 525, ENG 527, LOG 
335, PHI 331, PHI 332, PHI 425/PSY 425. PSY 340, PSY 400, PSY 420, PSY 430. Courses from at least three of the four primary 
disciplines of cognitive science must be represented in the minor. For purposes of the minor, the primary disciplines are philosophy 
(including logic), psychology, computer science, and linguistics. 



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Minor in Philosophy 

Students who take a Minor in Philosophy are required to complete with a grade of C or better fifteen hours of courses in selected 
fields in philosophy, including a course in the history of philosophy (3 credit hours), a course in normative (ethics and ethics-related) 
philosophy (3 credit hours), a course other than one in normative philosophy, but not including logic or the history of philosophy (3 
credit hours). 

Minor in Religious Studies 

Students who take a Minor in Religious Studies are required to compete with a grade of C or better fifteen hours of courses in 
selected fields of religious studies. In order to ensure a wide study of the field, students are required to select at least one course in 
Western religious traditions and at least one course in non- Western religious traditions. REL 101 and REL 102 may not be counted in 
the minor. 

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Caldwell Hall. Room 211 
phone: (919)515-2481 

J. H. Svara, Head 

E. O'Sullivan, Director of Public Administration Graduate Programs 

J. O. Williams, Director of Political Science Programs 

H. Hobbs, Director, Master of International Studies 

S. Carey, Director of Advising 

Professors: C.K. Coe, D.M. Daley, G.D. Carson, M.S. Soroos, J.H. Svara, J.O. Williams; Professors Emeriti: W.J. Block, W. 
Holtzman, E.R. Rubin; Associate Professors: C. Griffin, F. Hayes, S.H. Kessler, R.S. Moog, E. O'Sullivan, T.V. Reid, R.F. Stephen, 
J.E. Swiss, A.J. Taylor, M.L. Vasu; Associate Professors Emeriti: J.H. Gilbert, H.G. Kebschull, J.M. McClain; Assistant Professors: 
M.D. Cobb. N. Damall. S. Greene. P. Hayes. V.P. Munoz. N. Romanova; Visiting Assistant Professors: H. Hobbs, J.R. Homer, S.K. 
Strauss; Lecturers: S.M. Carey. J. A. Delp, P.M. Pavlik. 

The Department of Political Science and Public Administration offers basic and advanced courses in all major fields of the discipline: 
American government and politics (local, state, and national), public law and criminal justice, public administration, comparative 
politics, international relations and global issues, political theory, and methodology of political science. The department affords 
opportunities for the study of government and administration to students in other curricula and schools. 

Graduate courses in political science are available to advanced undergraduates. See the listing of graduate degree programs and 
consult the Graduate Catalog. 

The department provides academic credit for internships with political parties and campaigns, lobbyists, non-profits, and all levels of 
government, including the North Carolina General Assembly Legislative Internship Program. Majors in political science with 
distinguished academic achievements are annually invited to join the Zeta Epsilon Chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha, the national political 
science honor society. The department also supports a Model United Nations team. 

Opportunities 

A degree in political science is excellent preparation for a number of careers and graduate opportunities. Political science majors 
study critical issues surrounding such things as international security, public policy, and government practices. They develop real- 
world skills such as solving problems logically and systematically, working with others in vertically and horizontally organized 
arrangements, expressing a position and defending it with corroborating evidence, and writing clear and correct prose. They also 
develop citizenship and leadership competencies that include the personal obligation to participate in public life. Consequently, 
political science majors are well-positioned for careers in teaching, the legal profession, criminal justice agencies, state and local 
government, urban planning, the federal bureaucracy, journalism or in any of the organizations that seek to monitor political 
processes or to influence the content of public policy. Private firms also seek managers and public affairs specialists who have a 
knowledge of the functioning of the political system and of politics in general. 

Honors Program 

The honors program includes nine credit hours of specialized coursework designed to challenge academically talented majors and 
allow them to realize their greatest potential as political science students. Required for admission to the program: 3.25 GPA both 
overall and in the major, completion of 9 hours of PS coursework. and completion of PS 371. 

Majors admitted to the program complete a substantial research project in consultation with a faculty honors adviser (6 credit hours). 
Also required: either one 500 level PS course or an honors option 400 level political science course (3 credit hours). Successful 
completion of the program is noted on the student's transcript, and at commencement. 



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Curricula 

Bachelor of Arts in Political Science 

Major requirements are: 19 hours of core courses that cover major political science sub fields (i.e., American government, 
international relations, theory, public law and policy, and research methods) as well as courses that develop computer competencies 
and an orientation to the discipline; 15 hours of political science electives. 12 of which must be taken at the 300 level or above, and 
one of which must be a 400 level senior seminar, which includes a substantial research requirement. Grades of C- or better are 
required for courses applied towards the major. At graduation, a minimum GPA of 2.0 is required for all political science courses 
taken. For a semester-by-semester guide to the course requirements for the Bachelor of Arts curriculum, including all of the 
concentrations described below, see the departmental web site at www2.chass.ncsu.edu/pspa/. 

Students who wish to focus their studies in a specific sub field may elect one of the following concentrations under the Bachelor of 
Arts program: 

American Politics 

This concentration develops skills that benefit students interested in graduate and professional school, administrative careers, and 
business careers that involve government relations and policy. Major requirements are: 21 hours of core courses; 9 hours of courses 
specifically related to the study of political processes, institutions, political culture, and political events within the American system; 
and 4 hours of course work that develops computer competencies and orients students to the discipline of political science. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

International Politics 

This concentration develops skills that benefit students interested in graduate or professional school, careers in government service, 
inter national organizations, issue advocacy, and businesses with international interests. Major requirements are: 15 hours of core 
courses; 12 hours of concentration electives in regional and world politics; 3 hours of concentration electives in any political science 
sub field; and 4 hours of course work that develops computer competencies and orients students to the discipline of political science. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Law and Justice 

This concentration develops skills that benefit students interested in graduate or professional school (particularly law school), law 
enforcement, judicial administration, and careers with agencies involved in the administration of justice. Major requirements are: 18 
hours of core courses; 12 hours of emphasis electives in either the justice system or law and theory; and 4 hours of course work that 
develops computer competencies and orients students to the discipline of political science. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Public Policy 

This concentration prepares students for careers with public institutions where they will work with the processes, formulation, 
implementation, and evaluation of public policy at international, national, state, and local levels. Major requirements are: 1 5 hours of 
core courses; 1 5 hours of concentration electives; and 4 hours of course work that develops computer competencies and orients 
students to the discipline of political science. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg records/curricula 

Social Studies Teacher Option 

Students may combine the coursework for a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science with the coursework necessary to seek certification 
to teach at the 9-12 level in the North Carolina Public School System. Major requirements are 31 hours of political science course 
work covering the social studies competencies established by the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. Grades of C- or 
better for courses applied towards the major with a minimum GPA of 2.0 for all political science courses taken are required. For a 
semester-by-semester guide to the course requirements for the Social Studies Teacher Option curriculum, see the departmental web 
site at www2.chass.ncsu.edu/pspa. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Bachelor of Science in Political Science 

Major requirements are 27 hours of political science coursework. At least 6 hours must be taken from each of the following groups: 
Group A-American politics/or public policy and administration; Group B- international affairs/comparative politics; and Group C- 
political theory/scientific methods. At least 18 hours of coursework must be at the 300 level or higher. At least 6 hours of coursework 
must be at the 400 or 500 level, including one course that is designated as a senior seminar. Grades of C- or better for courses applied 
towards the major with a minimum GPA of 2.0 for all political science requirements for the Bachelor of Science curriculum, see the 
departmental web site at www2.chass.ncsu.edu/pspa/ 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 



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Minor in Political Science 

Minor requirements are 15 hours of political science coursework with grades of C- or better in each course and a cumulative GPA of 
2.0 for all political science courses. A minimum of 12 hours must be taken at the 300 level or above, including one 400 level senior 
seminar. Coursework must cover at least two of the following three groups: Group A- American politics/or public policy and 
administration; Group B- international affairs/comparative politics; and Group C- political theory/scientific methods. 

Minor in Law and Justice 

Minor requirements are 15 hours of political science coursework with grades of C- or better in each course and a cumulative GPA of 
2.0 for ail political science courses. These 15 hours must include: PS 205 (Law and Justice); 12 hours of elective courses, at least one 
of which must be a 400 level seminar or a 500 level graduate course in political science. This minor program is designed for students 
who have a special interest in the areas of public law, criminal justice and political theory. 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Foe Hall, Room 640 
phone: (919)515-2251 
www.ncsu.edu/psychology/ 

D. W. Martin, Head 

D. H. Mershon, Associate Head 

S. A. Converse-Lane, Assistant Head, Undergraduate Coordinator 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: K.W. Klein, D.H. Mershon, S.S. Snyder; Professors: L.E. Baker- Ward, J.W. 
Cunningham, D.W. Drewes, W.P. Erchul, D.O. Gray, A.G Halberstadt, T.M. Hess, J.W. Kalat, T.E. LeVere, J.E.R. Lunginbuhl, R.W. 
Nacoste, D.W. Martin, D.H. Mershon, J.J. Michael, S.E. Newman, F.J. Smith, B.W. Westbrook, M.S. Wogalter; Adjunct Professors: 
A.D. Hall, J.L. Howard, W. Tomow, L.G Tomatsky; Professors Emeriti: K.L. Barkley, J.C. Johnson, H.G. Miller, P.W. Thayer; 
Associate Professors: C.C. Brookins, S.A. Lane, RF. Horan, M.E. Haskett, K.W. Klein, S.B. Pond, A.C. Shulte, M.A. Wilson; 
Adjunct Associate Professors: B.H. Beith, B.A. Braddy-Burrus, B.F. Corder; Associate Professors Emeriti: J.L. Cole, R.F. Rawls; 
Clinical Assistant Professors: M.Y. Bingham, P.W. Collins; Assistant Professors: D.J. Bauer, S.B. Craig, C.B. Mayhom, R. Mitchell; 
Adjunct Assistant Professors: J.W. Fleenor, C.L. Kronberg, C.E. Lorenz, S.N. Palmer, B.H. Rogers; Associate Members of the 
Faculty: CD. Korte (Interdisciplinary Studies), R.G. Pearson (Industrial Engineering), J.L. Wasik (Statistics). 

Psychology is one of the basic majors in liberal arts and sciences. Psychologists use the methodology of science to study human 
behavior and experience. A bachelor's degree in psychology forms an excellent foundation for careers in business and government, 
as well as enhancing life skills such as parenting and human social interaction. Students can also use this degree as an entry into 
fiirther education leading to an advanced degree in applied or experimental psychology, or to such fields as law, medicine, business or 
social work. 

There are two programs for undergraduate majors in psychology: The General Option (PSY) and Human Resources Development 
(HRD). Each emphasizes different aspects of psychology. Separate descriptions of these programs are included in the next section. 

Honors Programs 

Honors tracks reside within the General Option and the Human Resource Option. The goals of the programs are to provide a 
curriculum that will expose the most talented majors to a more rigorous set of courses both within and outside of psychology than is 
required of standard undergraduate tracks and to provide them some pre-graduate school experiences. In addition, the program 
provides Honors students a close working relationship with individual faculty in research and data collection. By these means. 
Honors students develop transcript records attractive to graduate schools and are formally recognized for their superior achievement. 
To be eligible for admission, students must complete a minimum of 45 semester hours of course work (at least 15 at NC State) and 
have a grade point average of 3.25 or better. Additional details as to admission and requirements are available from the Psychology 
Department. 

All undergraduate majors are members of the Psychology Club, which provides a number of enrichment activities, including 
sponsorship of the Carolinas Psychology Conference. One of the largest undergriiduiile conferences in the United States, it is held 
annually in cooperation with Meredith College and other Cooperating Raleigh Colleges. There is also an active chapter of Psi Chi, 
the national psychology honor society, which provides enrichment to the program. 

Curriculum in Psychology - General Option 

The General Option is oriented toward the student who wants a broad understanding of the types of problems with which psychology 
is concerned and the ways in which psychologists approach and attempt to solve these problems. Curriculum requirements in the 
General Option are sufficiently flexible for students to concentrate, if they wish, in another area of study as well as psychology, and 
thereby prepare themselves for a variety of careers or professional programs. By wise choice of elective courses, a student can 
prepare for medical, legal, business, or education graduate training, while at the same time acquire a basic background in the social 
sciences. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 



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Minor in Cognitive Science 

The Departments of Psychology and Philosophy and Religion offer an interdisciplinary minor in cognitive science. The minor 
provides a general introduction to contemporary interdisciplinary research within the framework of the "computer model" mind, and 
offers the student the opportunity for in-depth study of selected topics of such as the nature of human information processing, and the 
acquisition and use of machine intelligence. 

To complete the minor, 15 hours are required, distributed as follows: PSY 420 (Cognitive Processes); PSY 340 (Ergonomics) or PSY 
744 (Human Information Processing); PHI 331 (Philosophy of Language); PHI 332 (Philosophy of Psychology); PHI/PSY 425/525 
(Introduction to Cognitive Science). 

Minor in Psychology 

The Psychology Department offers a minor in psychology to majors in any field except psychology. To complete the minor, eighteen 
hours of courses are required, six of these hours in the basic science of psychology, and nine in the applied aspects of psychology. 
PSY 200 is a required prerequisite. All must be passed with a grade of "'C" or better. 

Human Resource Development 

The Human Resource Development (HRD) Option is designed to provide a groundwork of skills and experience for students who 
wish to enter human service careers with a B.A. degree. With appropriate curriculum modifications, the program can also provide a 
sound background for students who wish to go into advanced degree programs in psychology, management, personnel, social work, 
counseling, guidance, education, and other areas. Students interested in graduate school should confer with their advisers in order to 
plan an appropriate course of study. 

The HRD Option focuses on enabling students to gain direct experience in the areas in which they would like to work. HRD students 
devote a semester to learning principles and skills related to working with human problems, and subsequently each HRD student 
spends a semester working part-time or full-time in a job related to his/her own area of interest. The HRD Option accepts a maximum 
of 20 students each year. Interested students already in the general option can apply for admissions to HRD during the Spring 
Semester of their sophomore or junior yean Further information about the HRD option is available through the Psychology 
Department office. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK 

1911 Building, Room 231 
phone: (919)515-2492 

J. Pennell, Head 

C. E. Waites, Assistant Head 

L. Williams, Director of Field Education 

Professor: J. Pennell; Associate Professor: C.E. Waites; Assistant Professor: N. Ames, J. Taliaferro; Lecturer: L.R. Williams 

The Department of Social Work is fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education and offers the Bachelor of Social Work 
(B.S.W.) degree. Students complete a curriculum based on the liberal arts that incorporates a professional foundation, including social 
work practice, human behavior and diversity, community social services, social policy, and research methods. Optional courses offer 
opportunities to study in depth various social work practice areas such as child welfare, health care, substance, abuse. African 
American families, and school social work. Students will complete preprofessional placements and a 480-hour field placement in a 
social service setting. A minor in Social Work is available. 

The purpose of the Department of Social Work is to prepare students for entry-level professional practice in social work or for 
advanced graduate-level academic work. The curriculum is a liberal arts base that includes English, literature, history, natural 
science, math, foreign language, philosophy, social sciences, physical education, and free electives. Forty-six hours of core social 
work courses. 3 hours of social work electives, and 3 hours of statistics complete the 122 hour graduation requirement. Enrollment in 
practice and field classes is limited to social work majors, and no credit towards the social work degree is given for student life 
experiences. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg records/curricula 

Opportunities 

Social work is an exciting, challenging, and dynamic profession. No matter what the political climate or the changing nature of 
personal or social need, social workers will be in demand. Social workers are employed in a variety of settings which include health 
care, mental health, services to the aging, child welfare, public welfare, substance abuse, public schools, developmental disabilities, 
and many other public and private settings. In each of these areas there is recognition for professional preparation, and the B.S.W. 
graduate will be prepared to embark upon a career in his or her chosen field. All states, including North Carolina, have licensing or 
certification procedures for social work practice. Graduation from the Department of Social Work makes the student eligible for such 
licensing or certification. 

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Minor in Social Work 

The minor is designed to familiarize students with the social service system, major social welfare programs, and elements of the 
profession of social work. The student takes four required courses and selects one additional courses from elective offerings, which 
represent the contribution of professional social work in a number of settings. 

Student Organizations 

Student Social Work Association (SSVVA) is open to all social work majors and provides an opportunity for students to socialize 
and become involved in the professional community outside the school through a wide variety of campus and community activities 
and aids in maintaining a sense of unity and purpose among the students. 

Student Association of Black Social Workers (SABSW) provides students with peer support, a chance to socialize with other social 
work majors, to process educational material, and examine how the curriculum tits the needs of African American social work majors 
and social work agencies in the community. 

Phi .4lpha Honor Society is national honor society for social work students. A student is eligible for membership after achieving 
national and local chapter requirements which include having sophomore status, achieving a 3.0 overall grade point average and a 
3.25 grade point average in required social work courses, and completing 9 hours of social work courses. 

Student Organization of Christian Social Workers provides students with the opportunity to glorify God through the profession of 
social work and to learn how. as Christians, to work in the field of social work. The organization promotes the open discussion of 
potential ethical dilemmas that may arise when Christian and secular viewpoints conflict. 

Matriculation into the Professional Degree Program 

The social work faculty is committed to helping all entering students evaluate career goals and objectives to ensure that the students 
meet minimum academic standards; have goals and objectives compatible with the major; and know specifically what the profession 
of social work is in terms of its philosophy, value base, and fields of practice. The admissions procedure is intended to strengthen the 
student's certainty regarding career choice and to enhance the student's focus and sense of purpose in curriculum planning. Specific 
components of the admissions procedure include: completion with a grade of B- or better of SW 20 1 and 290; participation in an 
orientation session; completion of the application for matriculation; and a personal interview with the Department Student Review 
Committee. The department is committed to assuring that adequate resources and support services are available to meet the 
educational needs of students; therefore, admission decisions will be made twice a year on a space-available basis within an 
established faculty:student ratio. The Department of Social Work Student Handbook spells out further details of this procedure, as 
well as other elements of the department. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 

1911 Building. Room 301 
phone: (919)515-3180 

W. B. ClitTord, Head 

P. L. McCall. Associate Head 

D. A. Curran. Undergraduate Administrator 

D. T. Tomaskovic-Devey, Director of Graduate Programs 

S. C. Lilley, Department E.xtension Leader 

Sociolog)^ Teaching, Research and Extension Staff: Goodnight-Glaxo Wellcome Endowed Professor: C.R. Tittle; William Neal 
Reynolds Professor: R.C. Wimberley; Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor: M.D. Schulman; Alumni Distinguished 
Undergraduate Professor: L.R. Delia Fave; Professors: V.M. Aldige, W.B. Clifford. TJ. Hoban, J.C. Leiter, RL. McCall, R.L. 
Moxley, B.J. Risman. D.T. Tomaskovic-Devey. E.M.Woodrum. M.A. Zahn. M.T. ZingrafT; Professors Emeriti: J.N. Collins, E.M. 
Crawford, T.N. Hobgood Jr, L.B. Otto, M.M. Sawhney, M.E. Voland, J.N. Young; Associate Professors; M.P. Atkins, R.F. Czaja, 
R.L. Engen. T.N. Greenstein. S.C. Lilley. M.L. Schwalbe. W.R. Smith. M.E. Thomas. M.S. Thompson. R.J. Thomson. K.M. Troost; 
Associate Professors Emeriti: R.C. Brisson. S.K. Garber. P.P. Thompson; Assistant Professor: S.M. DeCoster; Assistant Professors 
Emeriti: C.G. Dawson; Associate Member of the Faculty: R.D. Mustian (Agricultural and Extension Education). J.R. Thigpcn (Sea 
Grant); Adjunct Professor: A. Thompson (North Carolina A&T State University); Adjunct Associate Professor: C.R. Zimmer(UNC- 
Chapel Hill). 

Anthropology Teaching and Research Faculty: Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: A.L. Schiller; Associate 
Professors: J.M. Wallace; Associate Professors Emeriti: G.S. Nickerson. J.G. Peck. I. Rovner, M.L. Waiek; Assistant Professors: D.T. 
Case. R.S. Ellovich. S.M. Fitzpatrick, J.K. Jacka, A.H. Ross. 

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers introductory and advanced courses in sociology and anthropology covering 
the major subfields of the two disciplines. It also ofl'ers supervised fieldwork and practical experiences required for certain curricula 
in the department. 

Aims of the departmental offerings are to provide majors with academic background and experience useful for many careers in 
government and industry or for pursuing advanced academic work ( for a description of the graduate degrees oft'ered by the 
department, see the Graduate Catalog) and to provide service courses to other students. 

138 



College of Humanities and Social Sciences 



The department, jointly administered by the Colleges of Humanities and Social Sciences and Agriculture and Life Sciences, offers 
seven undergraduate curricula. The five curricula administered by the College of Humanities and Social Sciences are Bachelor of 
Arts in Sociology, Bachelor of Arts in Criminology, Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with Social Studies Teacher Education Option, 
Bachelor of Arts in General Anthropology, and Bachelor of Arts in Applied Anthropology. 

Honors Program 

In this program, outstanding majors pursue an individual program of study involving close working relations with departmental 
faculty. Twelve credit hours of honors courses will allow students to enhance their expertise in sociology and anthropology. Honors 
courses combine nine hours of credit in regular and independent study classes with a three-credit honors thesis done in consultation 
with a faculty honors adviser. 

To be admitted, students must have earned 12 hours in their major and have a 3.25 overall GPA and a 3.25 in the major. To graduate 
with Sociology/Anthropology Honors, the student must have a 3.25 GPA overall and in the major. Successful completion of the 
program is noted on the student's transcript diploma and at commencement. 

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology 

Sociology studies the behavior and interaction of people as they operate in society. The groups that people form such as families, 
peers, ethnic groups, and social classes are investigated. The following departmental requirements must be met by all students 
majoring in sociology: A minimum of 3 1 hours in the major field including SOC 300; theory, SOC 400 or 401 ; at least three but no 
more than six credit hours of 200-level sociology courses; at least 15 credit hours of 400 level or above sociology courses including 
SOC 400 or SOC 401. Additional electives in sociology may be at the 300 level or above. ST 311 is also required. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Major in Sociology with Social Studies Teacher Education Option 

This curriculum prepares the student for state certification in social studies in the secondary school system (125 hours required for 
graduation). The inclusion of a professional semester with practice teaching and the need for a broad base in the social sciences 
makes this a comparatively demanding program. Courses in education and psychology are taken beginning in the sophomore year in 
preparation for the teaching experience. The student learns the basic concepts of anthropology, geography, history, and political 
science, as well as sociology. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology 

The major introduces students to anthropology with basic and advanced offerings in the subdisciplines of the field. The comparative 
nature of anthropology is reflected by courses based in a variety of geographical areas. Theory and methods courses are required. An 
internship is required for the applied concentration. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Bachelor of Arts in Criminology 

The Criminology degree seeks to develop a professional orientation that will be relevant both to occupational goals and participation 
as a citizen in community affairs. Courses providea general background in the causes of crime and the agencies of criminal justice. 
More specific areas covered deal with deviance, juvenile delinquency, the court system, correctional facilities, and the like, including 
field placement in an agency of the criminal justice system. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Minor in Anthropology 

A minor in Anthropology focuses on the comparative study of human beings, with emphasis on biology and behavior. A flexible 
selection of courses (15 credit hours) includes offerings from anthropological subdisciplines such as cultural anthropology, physical 
anthropology, archaeology, and linguistics. 

Minor in Criminology 

The criminology minor emphasizes criminological theory and research. The minor is grounded in sociological theory and methods 
and allows students flexibility in the choice of specialized criminological study such as juvenile delinquency, sociology of law, 
formal institutions of social control, community and crime, and data analysis in criminology, ideology and social justice. 

Minor in Sociology 

This minor emphasizes sociological theory and research with substantive applications. The minor builds on theory and methodology 
and allows students flexibility in the choice of sub-specialties such as stratification, race and ethnic relations, agriculture, 
development, work and organization, or the family. 



139 



COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT 




Nelson Hall 

NCSU Box 8614 

Raleigh, NC 27695-8614 

phone: (919)515-5565 

fax:(919)515-5564 

e-mail: management^a ncsu.edu 

www.mgt.ncsu.edu 



Jon Bartley. Dean 

Gilroy Zuckerman. Associate Dean, Academic Affairs 

Steve Allen, Associate Dean, Graduate Programs and Research 

Gail A. Hankins, Assistant Dean, Academic Affairs 



College of Management 



The mission of the College of Management is to provide the citizens of North Carolina high quality education in accounting, business 
management and economics; to produce distinguished research and publications; and to provide high quality executive education and 
outreach programs. The college's undergraduate and graduate degree programs are the core of its mission and are distinguished by 
their excellence and their emphasis on the management of technology and those aspects of management that interface with the other 
technical and professional disciplines at North Carolina State University. 

Vision 

The College of Management will be recognized for excellence in management education, for its emphasis on the management of 
technology and for its unique dual-degree and cross-disciplinary programs with other colleges at North Carolina State University. 

About the College 

The College of Management offers a variety of curricula that prepare graduates to become leaders in a global business environment. 
Students may prepare for careers in fields such as accounting, information technology, financial management, supply chain 
management, marketing, sales, economic analysis, human resource management, management information systems, 
entrepreneurship, and general management. Opportunities for employment include corporations, consulting and public accounting 
firms, government agencies, and non-profit organizations. Many graduate pursue advanced studies in law, professional accounting, 
economics and business administration. 

The curricula provide all students with a broad liberal arts background combined with a strong concentration in accounting, business, 
and economics. Communication skills and computer usage are stressed throughout the course work. The college faculty are dedicated 
to excellence in teaching and research. An outstanding faculty combined with innovative curricula provide students with the 
opportunity to acquire the basic knowledge and management skills necessary to become leaders in the business world. Many courses 
are offered in the evening as well as the day and provide part-time education opportunities to employed adults. 

The three departments in the college. Accounting, Business Management, and Economics, graduate more than 500 students annually. 
Four undergraduate degree programs are offered: B.S. in Accounting, B.S. in Business Management, and B.A. and B.S. in 
Economics. The accounting and business management degrees are professionally oriented while the economics degrees are both 
liberal arts degrees. New freshmen and transfer students with fewer than 40 hours of college credit may enter an Undeclared Major in 
the college. After completing 40 credit hours, students in the undeclared major enter a degree program. Graduate degrees offered 
include: Master of Accounting, Master of Economics, Master of Business Administration, and Ph.D. in Economics. 

The College of Management's programs in business management and accounting have earned accreditation by AACSB 
International- The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Accreditation brings the college into the select ranks of 
the best business and management schools internationally and adds value to the degrees students earn from the college. 

The Alexander Hamilton Scholars Program is a dual degree program sponsored jointly by the College of Management and the 
College of Humanities and Social Sciences at North Carolina State University. The program is designed for undergraduate students 
wishing to complement a management degree with a strong emphasis on international studies. For further information, contact Dr. 
John Dutton, program Co-Director at 515-6948. 

Academic Minors 

Academic minors for students in other majors are offered in accounting, business management, and economics. Students should be 
aware that it is currently very difficult to earn a minor in business management. For more information, please see the following 
address: www.mgt.ncsu.edu/academic/bsbusmgt.html. 

Student Activities 

There are two honor societies: Beta Gamma Sigma for accounting and business management majors and Omicron Delta Epsilon for 
economics majors. Students also have the opportunity to join many management related organizations including the Accounting 
Society, Alpha Kappa Psi (professional business fraternity). Ambassadors Club, American Advertising Federation, College of 
Management Student Advisory Board, Economics Society, Entrepreneurs Club, Ethics Society, Institute of Management 
Accountants, National Association of Black Accountants, Pre-Law Student Association, Society of African-American Corporate 
Leaders, and the Society for Human Resource Management. These organizations sponsor social events and hold regular meetings 
where business leaders discuss current issues and provide career advice. 

Facilities 

Nelson Hall, the home of the College of Management, was newly renovated in 2000. A large computing lab in Nelson Hall provides 
students access to multimedia personal computers served by a local area network and linked to the Internet. All of the college's 
primary classrooms are equipped for multimedia presentations. 

Student Services 

The College of Management provides comprehensive academic advising services to undergraduate students. New freshmen and off- 
campus transfer students are assigned to specialized advisers. All students have access to a faculty adviser and the college's 
professional advising staff located in the Academic Affairs Office, Nelson Hall. 



141 



College of Management 



Scholarships 

In addition to university-wide awards, the college has several scholarships for College of Management majors, primarily for entering 
freshmen. The college contacts all freshmen applicants for admission who may be eligible for scholarships. Upperclassmen are 
encouraged to contact their department, as well as the University Financial Aid office for more information on availability. 

DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING 

Nelson Hall 

phone: (919)515-2256 

F. A. Backless, Head 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: K.A. Krawczyk, R.L. Peace; KPMG Professor: F.A. Buckless; Professors: J.W. 
Bartley, A.Y. Chen, R.L. Peace, P.F. Williams; Associate Professors: M.S. Beasley, B.C. Branson, D.P Pagach, L.M. Wright, G.J. 
Zuckerman; Assistant Professors: M. Bradford, J.F. Brazel, J.G. Jenkins, K.R. Nunez; Lecturers: E.R. Carraway, J.W. Giles, H.O. 
Griffm, W.A. Koole, R.E. Thomas. 

The accounting program provides education and training to individuals who will pursue careers as professional accountants in 
business, government, and industry. The Department of Accounting currently otTers a Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting. The 
degree requires the student to specialize in one of three concentrations: Information Systems, Financial Analysis or Managerial. In 
order to meet the demands of employment markets for more high skilled accounting professionals and respond to the American 
Institute of Certified Public Accountants' mandated 150-hour education requirement, the Department of Accounting also offers a 
graduate Master of Accounting (MAC) degree program. 

The Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting consists of a broad foundation in humanities, social science, science and mathematics; 
a comprehensive business core; a comprehensive accounting core; and a concentration in a functional accounting area. Students 
develop strong communication and team skills. Many courses prepare students to use information technology to solve accounting and 
business problems. 

Opportunities 

Accounting systems and the accountants who maintain them are absolutely essential to the functioning of business enterprises of all 
types and sizes, to government at all levels; and to nonprofit organizations. Many career opportunities are available to accounting 
graduates. Starting salaries are among the highest of all university graduates, and potential earnings over a lifetime are excellent. 

The accounting profession is organized into three major employment groups: 

• approximately 60 percent of accountants are employed in business entities; 
another 10 percent work in non-business entities 

• about 30 percent are in public practice. 

Public accountants offer auditing tax preparation and planning and management consulting to individuals, businesses, and other 
organizations on a fee basis. Management or industrial accountants design financial and cost accounting systems and provide their 
companies with financial management, financial analysis, planning and budgeting, product costing, and operational auditing. 
Governmental units and other not-for-profit entities have informational needs similar to private businesses. Accountants employed by 
such entities perform many of the same functions. Accountants in some governmental agencies, such as the SEC, IRS, and FBI, serve 
the dual function of auditing and law enforcement. Certified public accountants (CPAs), certified management accountants (CMAs), 
certified internal auditors (CIAs), and certified cost analysts (CCAs) are individuals who. like doctors, dentists, and lawyers, are 
licensed to practice their profession. Such certifications are granted to those accountants who pass a qualifying examination and meet 
certain accounting experience and educational requirements. 




142 



College of Management 



Honors Program 

The Accounting Honors Program is designed for academically talented and highly motivated students seeking a richer educational 
experience. Students can expand their understanding of accounting's role in society and to investigate accounting problems and 
issues in greater depth. The instructional environment gives students opportunities to develop critical thinking, problem-solving, and 
communication skills. Students will be better prepared for entry into graduate programs and employment possibilities. 

Admission Requirements 

Completion of 30 hours of course work at NC State with at least a 3.25 overall GPA. 

Graduation Requirements for Honors 

Students must achieve at least a 3.25 overall GPA and at least a 3.25 GPA in all honors courses completed. 

Honors Coursework: 

• 12 credit hours of honors course work minimum required. The 12 hours of honors course work must contain courses from at least 
two of the following categories: Special courses, advanced courses, and independent study. 

In their senior year, all honors students must take either a regularly scheduled honors section of ACC 490 or a faculty-initiated 
honors option in ACC 490. ACC 490 will include a major project and/or a small group tutorial that meets the Honors Program 
requirement for "independent study." 

Remaining 9 hours credit must be selected from among the following categories: 

1 . Honors sections of any 300- or 400-level ACC courses 

2. Student or faculty initiated honors options in any 300- or 400-level ACC course 

3. Honors credit through honors section, student initiated honors option, or faculty initiated honors option in any EC or BUS 
course (no more than 3 credit hours from EC or BUS courses may count towards the remaining 9 credit hours.) 

4. Advanced courses: 500-level MAC courses taken as elective courses or as substitutes for 300- or 400-level courses, subject 
to approval by the Honors Program Director. 

Curriculum and Degree Requirements 

All Accounting majors are subject to a departmental residency requirement that they complete a minimum of 30 credit hours of 
course work at NC State after being formally admitted to the B.S. degree program in Accounting (or the B.S. in Business 
Management). In addition. Accounting majors must complete at least 30 hours of major courses and at least six of the following 
courses in residency at NC State: ACC 3 10, 31 1, 320, 330, 410, 450, and 490. A "General Policies" statement for all College of 
Management majors is available in Nelson Hall. It serves as an addendum to the curriculum requirements and describes GPA 
requirements for graduation, residency requirements, suspension policy, required grades in specific courses, course repeat policy, etc. 

Minor 

The accounting minor is offered to students interested in gaining a basic knowledge of accounting and an understanding of how 
accounting information is used to make rational decisions by individuals, businesses, and society. The minor required 15 hours of 
accounting courses an includes an introduction to financial, managerial, and tax accounting. 

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

Nelson Hall 

phone: (919)515-5567 

S. H. Barr, Department Head 

P. J. Bostic, Director of M.B.A. Program 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: J. P. Huggard, C.B. Kimbrough; Professors: S.G. Allen, S. Barr, R.L. Clark, R.A. 
Handfield, C.P. Jones, M. Montoya- Weiss, M.A. Rappa; Associate Professors: L. Aiman-Smith, D.L. Baumer, C.C. Bozarth, S.N. 
Chapman, K.S. Davis, J.C. Dutton, S.K. Markham, J.K. McCreery, K. Mitchell, P Mulvey, A. Padilla, J.C. Poindexter, Jr., J. Powell, 
B.B. Tyler, G. Voss, G. Young; Assistant Professors: R. Bergey, J. Blackhurst, J.B. Earp, D. Henard, L. Lundstrum, K. Malkewitz, A. 
McFadyen, S. Moon, F.C. Payton, S.E. Scullen, D. Sirdeshmukh, M. Walker, R. Warr, D. Warsing; Lecturers: J. P. Huggard, PG 
Palin, J. Powell, W. Sloan; Associate Members of the Faculty: A. Kingon, M.E. Kurz. 

The Department of Business Management offers a Bachelor of Science degree in business management that prepares students for 
careers in business, government, or nonprofit organizations and for graduate study in business, law, and related fields. The curriculum 
offers a broad professional education with a specialization in a business field such as finance, human resources, marketing, 
management information systems, and operations/supply chain management. Career opportunities are available in areas such as 
retailing, banking and financial services, high tech manufacturing, transportation, consulting, and government agencies. 

The Bachelor of Science degree in business management consists of a broad foundation of humanities, social science, sciences, and 
mathematics; comprehensive business courses; and a concentration in a ftinctional business area. The program emphasizes 
management in a highly competitive global economy. Students develop strong communication skills and learn to work in teams. 
Many courses prepare students to use information technology and computers to solve real business problems. Required courses in the 

143 



College of Management 



major include topics such as; accounting, business strategy, communications, economics, finance, information technology, legal 
environment of business, marketing, operations management, organizational behavior, and quantitative methods. Business 
management students also complete a four-course business concentration. 

Curriculum and Degree Requirements 

All Business Management majors are subject to a departmental residency requirement that they complete a minimum of 30 credit 
hours of course work at NC State after being formally admitted to the B.S. degree program in Business Management (or the B.S. in 
Accounting). In addition. Business Management majors must complete at least 30 credit hours of the major course requirements of 
the degree while in residency at NC State. A "General Policies" statement for all College of Management majors is available in 
Nelson Hall. It serves as an addendum to the curriculum requirements and describes GPA requirements for graduation, residency 
requirements, suspension policy, required grades in specific courses, course repeat policy, etc. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Honors Program 

This is open to academically talented and highly motivated students seeking a more thorough preparation for future careers in 
business. Students are exposed to a richer set of business problems taught in smaller classes by distinguished faculty. Opportunities 
are provided for students to develop critical thinking, problem solving, and communication skills. Students will be better prepared for 
entry into graduate programs and attractive employment possibilities. 

.Admission Requirements 

Completion of 30 hours of course work at NC State with at least a 3.25 overall GPA. 

Graduation Requirements for Honors 

Completion of 12 credit hours of honors course work and achievement of at least a 3.25 overall GPA and at least a 3.25 GPA in all 
honors courses completed. 

Honors Coursework 

1 2 Credit hours minimum of honors work is required. The 1 2 hours of honors course work must contain courses from at least two 
of the following categories: Special courses, advanced courses, and independent study 

In their senior year, all honors students must take either a regularly scheduled honors section of BUS 480. Business policy and 
Strategy or a faculty initiated Honors option in BUS 480. The honors BUS 480 will include a major project and'or a small group 
tutorial that meets the Honors Program requirement for "independent study." 

Nine (9) Credit hours of honors course work must be selected from the following categories: 

1 . Honors sections of 300- or 400-level BUS courses (special courses). 

2. Faculty initiated honors options in 400-level BUS concentration courses (special courses). 

3. Subject to approval of the Honors Program Director. 500-level MBA (daytime) courses taken as substitutes for required 
courses or electives (advanced courses). 

4. Ma.ximum of one honors section (3 credit hours) in any 300- or 400-level ACC or EC course (special course). 

Minor in Business Management 

The Department of Business Management otTers a minor in Business Management to undergraduates other than those majoring in the 
B.S. degree in Accounting (ACC). Students majoring in Textile and Apparel Management (TXM) or Agricultural Business 
Management (ABM) must meet the standard course requirements for the Business Management Minor including at least three 
courses (9 credit hours) that are not required courses for their major (or part of a list of alternative courses that meet a major 
requirement). Students should be aware that it is currently very diflficult to earn a minor in business management. Also, changes to the 
business management minor are pending. For more information please see the following address: www.mgt.ncsu.edu/academic/ 
bsbusmgt.html. 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

328 Nelson Hall 
phone: (919)515-3274 

P. Pearce. Head 

D. J. Flath, Director of Graduate Programs 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: D.N. Hyman, J.S. Lapp, M.B. McElroy; Professors: S.G. Allen. R.L. Clark, L.A. 
Craig. E.W. Erickson, T.J. Grennes. A.R. Hall. M. Holt. D.M. Holthausen, C.R. Knoeber, J.S. Lapp, S.E. Margolis. R.B. Palmquist. 
D.K. Pearce, J.J. Seater. W.N. Thurman. W.J. Wessels; Associate Professors: D.S. Ball. A.E. Headen, CM. Newmark. T.C. 
Tsoulouhas; Assistant Professors: A. Chanda. D. Pelletier; Associate Member of the Faculty: D.A. Hickey (Statistics). 

The Department of Economics offers Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in Economics. An undergraduate program in 
economics prepares a student for careers in business or government as well as for graduate and professional schools. Economics 

144 



College of Management 



students can develop their understanding of economic issues in a variety of areas, including financial institutions, international trade 
and finance, labor and industrial relations, health care economics, industrial organization environmental and natural resource 
economics, public fmance, and economic history. An economics degree is attractive to employers because it provides a rigorous 
analytical training with a broad understanding of the workings of the economic system. Its flexibility also allows students to tailor 
their education to specific interests and career goals. An undergraduate degree in economics has long served as the foundation for 
advanced professional degrees in business and law, as well as for graduate study in economics. 

Honors Program 

The Honors Program in Economics is designed for academically talented and motivated students who desire a richer educational 
experience than offered in regular courses. The primary goal of this program is to help students develop the ability to apply economic 
analysis to issues involving choice at the individual, household, firm and government level. Admission to the program requires junior 
standing, completion of at least 30 hours at NC State with a 3.0 GPA, and grades of B or better in EC 301, and 302. To graduate with 
honors in economics, a student must have at least a 3.25 overall GPA and 3.25 or better in all economics courses taken at NC State. In 
addition, the student must take the Honors Seminar (EC 490H) and at least two of the following honors sections of EC 301, EC 302, 
faculty-initiated Honors Option EC courses, or ECG courses. 

Curricula 

The Bachelor of Arts in economics is a broad and flexible program of study. The major course work for the Bachelor of Arts in 
economics includes 9 semester hours of economic theory and 15 hours of mathematics, statistics, and computer science. In addition, 
students study at least 18 semester hours of advanced, applied economics. The program provides for substantial flexibility so that 
students, in consultation with their faculty advisers, may tailor their studies to their particular interests and long-term objectives. 

The Bachelor of Science in economics puts particular emphasis on training in analytical methods in economics. It differs from the 
Bachelor of Arts by having less emphasis on the liberal arts and greater emphasis on courses in mathematics, science, and statistics. 
A "General Policies" statement for all College of Management majors is available in Nelson Hall. It serves as an addendum to the 
curriculum requirements and describes GPA requirements for graduation, residency requirements, suspension policy, required grades 
in specific courses, course repeat policy, etc. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Curriculum in Economics, Bachelor of Arts 
Curriculum in Economics, Bachelor of Science 

Minor in Economics 

Open to all undergraduate majors outside the Department of Economics, the minor in economics is designed to give students a basic 
understanding of economic analysis and involve them in applied work in one or more fields of economics. The minor in economics is 
an excellent complement to many majors within the university, including political science, statistics, business, accounting, and 
engineering. To complete the minor in economics, students must take EC 205 (or EC 201 ), EC 301, EC 302, and two additional 
economics courses at the 300 level or higher for total of 1 5 semester hours. Please contact the Academic Affairs office in Nelson Hall 
for specific information about admission and other requirements. 




145 



COLLEGE OF 
NATURAL RESOURCES 




1022-A Biltmore Hall 

NCSU Box 8001 

Raleigh, NC 27695-8001 

phone: (919)515-6191; fax: (919)513-3496 

e-mail: natural_resources(fl ncsu.edu 

www.natural-resources.ncsu.edu 



Larry A. Nielsen, Dean 

Adrianna G. Kirkman. Associate Dean, Academic Aftairs 

J.B. Jett, Associate Dean, Research 

Kris Fowler, Director, Recruiting and Knroliment Management 

Thomas Easley. Director, Diversity Community in Natural Resources 

Brookie Lambert, Director, Academic and Student Services 

Scott Payne, Director, Information Technology 



College of Natural Resources 




The mission of the College of Natural Resources is to improve 
the use and stewardship of renewable natural resources. We seek 
to strengthen natural resource management, enhance 
environmental quality, increase productivity of forest enterprises, 
expand recreation and tourism opportunities, and encourage 
sound regional economic development. To these ends, we 
provide superior professional education, discover new 
knowledge, and disseminate credible and timely infonnation. 

The success of our students is our top priority and is 
accomplished through an unwavering commitment to excellence 
from all individuals involved in the educational enterprise. The 
College of Natural Resources is a place where the physical, 
biological and social sciences intersect. The interaction of 
disciplines, all of which are dependent upon the natural resources 
base, makes the College of Natural Resources a dynamic, 
diverse, and exciting place to study and to work. Our goal is to 
provide educational programs, facilities, and services for a 
population of students, faculty, and staff that reflect the diversity 
in culture of our state, our country, and our world. In our College 
diversity is characterized in many ways, such as the geographic origin, age, gender, ethnic background, the career paths of our 
students, and the professional disciplines of our faculty. Faculty, staff administrators, and students come from the northern, southern, 
eastern, and western parts of the United States and from many nations including: Australia, Canada, the Czech Republic, China, 
Egypt, India, Iran, and the Philippines. 

The College of Natural Resources offers students professional and technical curricula that emphasize finding solutions to real world 
problems. Our College consists of students and professionals dedicated to the highest achievement in science-based global forest 
stewardship, research and development of forest products that raise the standard of living for all people, and recreation that enriches 
societies and cultures through responsible enjoyment of our natural resources. Although interrelated, the three academic departments- 
- Forestry; Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management; and Wood and Paper Science- draw faculty and students with very different 
career aspirations. The common thread is the sustainable and wise use of the world's natural resources. 

Students within the College of Natural Resources find an intellectually challenging environment and an educational community that 
is conducive to learning. With the increasing diversity and size of the college's population, our goal of raising the standard of living 
for all people becomes a realistic and inspiring goal. 

Degree Programs 

The College of Natural Resources offers programs of study leading to baccalaureate and graduate degrees in the management and use 
of natural resources, and also offers courses in these areas to students in other colleges. Eight professional curricula are administered 
in the college through its Departments of Forestry; Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management; and Wood and Paper Science, and 
two additional curricula are offered through shared programs in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences and Environmental Technology with 
the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. These programs provide a broad education in the biological, physical, and social 
sciences as well as a sound cultural and professional background. Baccalaureate degrees prepare students for careers in the fields of 
fisheries and wildlife management; forest management; natural resources assessment and management; environmental monitoring 
and testing; parks, recreation and tourism management; professional golf management; paper science and engineering; environmental 
science-watershed hydrology; and wood products. 

Graduate degrees offered include Master of Science, Master of Forestry, Master of Natural Resources Administration, Master of 
Wood and Paper Science, Masters of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management, and the Doctor of Philosophy. Graduate degree 
programs may be tailored to a variety of specialized and interdisciplinary topics related to the teaching and research activities of the 
college. In addition, a graduate certificate in Graphical Information Systems is available to NC State students who wish to develop 
recognized academic credentials in the GIS area. Applicants should consult the Graduate Catalog for additional information about 
these programs. 

Student Activities 

Each department in the college has a student curriculum club and/or student chapter of the appropriate national professional 
organization. All of these organizations provide opportunities for professional development, for interaction with faculty and other 
students, and for participation in local, regional, and national student and professional activities. Student representatives from each 
organization and curriculum serve on the College of Natural Resources Council. The Council provides overall coordination for 
student activities, allocates funds for student activities, and oversees production of the Pinetum, the College of Natural Resources 
student yearbook. 

Facilities and Laboratories 

In addition to standard classrooms and teaching laboratories, the College of Natural Resources has a unique complex of indoor and 
field facilities that are utilized in the academic programs. Computer facilities include a general computer lab, two labs with 
computers and workstations for applications in geographic infonnation systems and remote sensing, and access to the university 
computer network. Also available are several different analytical and biotechnology facilities, a photo interpretation lab, an extensive 



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herbarium, and a wood sample collection. Facilities tor field instruction and projects include SO, 000 acres in the forest: the Hofmann 
Forest on the Coastal Plain; the Hill, Schenck, Hope Valley and Goodwin Forests in the Piedmont; and the Slocum summer camp at 
the Hill Forest in Durham county. Specialized pilot plant laboratories unique to wood and paper science are contained in the Hodges 
Wood Products Laboratory and the Reuben B. Robertson Pulp and Paper Laboratory. Equipment in the Hodges Laboratory includes 
computer controlled woodworking machinery, dry kilns, veneer lathe and numerous other items required to convert wood into 
products. The Robertson Laboratory is a 50,000 sq. ft. facility, which contains laboratories and modern pulping and paper making 
equipment dedicated to teaching and research activities. E.xamples of equipment are secondary fiber recycling equipment, a thermo- 
mechanical pulping unit, a pilot-scale paper machine, process control equipment, paper testing laboratory, and pulping digesters. 

Field of Instruction and Work Experience 

All curricula in the college have strong components of hands-on field and laboratoiy instruction and experience, and all either require 
or strongly recommend voluntary on-the-job work experience. All students are required to complete the equivalent of one or more of 
the following summer activities: camp, internship, practicum, and work experience. The Forest Management and Fisheries and 
Wildlife curricula both have required summer camps. Undergraduates enrolled in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management 
complete a 9-week internship immediately following the completion of the junior year. All Paper Science majors complete a 12 week 
internship in an industrial setting approved by the college. Wood Products students attend a summer practicum following the 
freshman year and are required to complete a summer internship in the industry. Students in all curricula may also participate in 
summer jobs and the cooperative education program to gain work experience. 

Local field trips are a regular part of many courses. Additional field instruction and scheduled trips to representative industries and 
agencies are frequently required as part of regular class assignments. 

Honors and Scholars Programs 

The College of Natural Resources participates in the University Honors Program, the University Scholars Program, and the Women 
in Science and Engineering (WISE) Program in which exceptional new students (freshman or transfer) are selected for special 
courses and activities that provide an expanded educational experience. 

The College of Natural Resources also offers a disciplinary honors program which offers the opportunity for advanced students with 
outstanding records to enhance the depth of study in their major field. Students with an overall GPA of 3.0 or better and a major GPA 
of 3.25 or better are invited to participate in the Honor's Program. Students must have at least 40 hours of credit. Honors students 
develop more rigorous programs of study, frequently taking advanced courses in mathematics, science, or social science, or graduate 
courses in the chosen curriculum. With the adviser's consent honors students may substitute preferred courses for normally required 
courses in order to develop strength in special interest areas. Honors students are required to undertake a program of independent 
study, which can involve a research problem or special project during their junior or senior year, and they must participate in the 
senior honors seminar. 

Two honor societies in the College of Natural Resources promote and recognize academic excellence: Xi Sigma Pi (for all majors 
within the college) and Rho Phi Lambda (for recreation majors). Advanced undergraduate and graduate students with high academic 
achievement are invited to become members of these societies. High achieving forest management and natural resources students are 
also eligible for recognition by two agriculture honor societies. Alpha Zeta and Gamma Sigma Delta. All students are also eligible for 
recognition by the campus-wide honor societies. 

Gifford Pinchot Scholars Program 

The Gifford Pinchot Scholars Program, a joint program with the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, follows the model 
established by the Jefferson, Franklin, and Whitney Programs. Academically talented students are invited to pursue simultaneously a 
B.S. degree in Forest Management through the College of Natural Resources and a B.A. degree through the College of Humanities 
and Social Sciences. The Pinchot Scholars Program is limited to a small number ( 10 or fewer per year) of highly qualified and 
motivated students. Scholarship support is available to some participants in the Pinchot Scholars Program. 

Pinchot Scholars follow the requirements for the B.S. in Forest Management (with one exception: the physics course PY is not 
required). For the B.A. degree, they follow a 30-hour major concentration in multidisciplinary studies. Included in this major are two 
core requirements: MDS 340 Perspectives in Agricultural History (3 credits) and MDS 498 Senior Thesis (3 credits). Participants 
also complete an additional MDS seminar ( I credit). In addition, Pinchot Scholars complete all the general education requirements 
for a B.A. degree in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. A total of 1 55 credit hours are required for the double degree 
which students can complete in four and a half years. 

The multidisciplinary studies major will involve placing forest management in the context of cross-cultural perspectives, global 
issues, and public policy. The exact set of courses that will constitute the major will be determined by the students in consultation 
with their ad\ isory group, subject to the approval of the Multidisciplinary Studies Committee. Each student is assigned an advisory 
group consisting of an academic adviser from each college, plus a mentor from the forest industry. Pinchot Scholars also participate 
in existing cooperative activities with other double-degree program scholars. For more information, contact the Associate Dean for 
Academic AtTairs, College of Natural Resources, 1022-N Biltmore, Box 8001 or the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Academic 
Affairs, Colleee of Humanities and Social Sciences, 1 06 Caldwell, Box 8101. 



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Scholarships 

The College of Natural Resources administers a large program of academic scholarships that is separate from the University Merit 
Awards Program. Academic scholarships (ranging from $1,000 to $10,000 per year), renewable annually, are awarded in several 
program areas to entering freshmen and transfer students. The appropriate departments accept applications, and based on academic 
excellence and leadership award the scholarships that are administered through the North Carolina Forestry Foundation and the Pulp 
and Paper Foundation. The awards include a total of over 170 scholarships for students in the fisheries and wildlife science; forest 
management; natural resources; parks, recreation and tourism management; paper science and engineering; and wood products 
curricula. 

Computer Competency 

Extensive use of microcomputers and workstations is incorporated throughout all curricula of the College of Natural Resources. 
Students are expected to use the computer for increasingly complex class assignments and for the preparation of papers and reports. 
Computing resources are available for student use in the college and elsewhere on campus, but many students find it advantageous in 
terms of convenience to purchase a personal computer. Questions about such a purchase should be directed to the Associate Dean for 
Academic Affairs or the appropriate departmental curriculum coordinator. 

International Activities 

Students in the College of Natural Resources are exposed to the international dimensions of their programs in a variety of ways. 
Many faculty members regularly travel abroad and a number are active in major projects in foreign countries, including an 
international cooperative research project concentrating on Central American and Mexico and a faculty exchange program with 
Sweden. With that faculty experience, the international aspects of many topics are covered in core courses, and several elective 
undergraduate and graduate courses focus specifically on the international dimensions of natural resource management. In addition, 
many international students enroll in the college with as many as 21 different countries represented in recent years. There are also in- 
the-major study and work-abroad opportunities, some of which are led by faculty from the college, which range from two-week trips 
to five-week Summer Sessions, to ten-week jobs in a variety of locales. 

DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY 

Jordan Hall, Room 31 19 
phone: (919)515-2891 

F. W. Cubbage, Head 

J. P. Roise, Director of Undergraduate Programs 

R. C. Abt, Director of Graduate Programs 

Distinguished University Professor: E.B. Cowling; Alumni Distinguished 

Undergraduate Professor: G.B, Blank, R.R. Braham, R.A. Lancia; Carl Alwin 

Schenck Professor: H.L. Allen; Edwin F. Conger Distinguished Professor; 

R.R. Sederoff; Professors: R.C. Abt, H.L. Allen, R.I. Bruck, V.L.C. Chiang, 

E.B. Cowling, F.W. Cubbage, PD. Doerr, W.S. Dvorak, E.C. Franklin, D.J. 

Frederick, L.F. Grand, J.D. Gregory, A.E. Hassan, J.B. Jett, S. Khorram, R.A. 

Lancia, S.E. McKeand, L.A. Nielsen, T.J. MuUin, J. P. Roise, R.R. Sederoff: 

Research Professor: V.P. Aneja; Professors Emeriti: A.W. Cooper, C.B. Davey, 

D.L. Holley, R.C. Kellison, R.L. Noble, T.O. Perry, L.T. Tombaugh, B.J. 

Zobel; Associate Professor: H.V. Amerson, R.E. Bardon, G.B. Blank, R.R. Braham, H.M. Cheshire, L.J. Frampton, B. Goldfarb, GR. 

Hess, G.R. Hodge, E.M. Jones, B. Li, L. Li, B-H. Liu, T.H. Shear, A.M. Stomp, R.W. Whetten; Associate Professor Emeriti: E.G. 

Jervis, R.J. Weir; Assistant Professor: J. Callazo, B.L. Conkling, D.W. Hazel, F. Isik, S.E. Moore, C.E. Moorman, S.A.C. Nelson, 

E.G. Nichols, D.J. Robison. E.O. Sills, T.A. Steelman, G. Sun, L.M. VanZyl; Visiting Assistant Professor: E.S. Goldgeier, S. 

Pattanayak, R.H. Schaberg; Lecturers: J.L. Cox, T.H. Litzenberger; Associate Members of the Faculty: P.T. Bromley, W.J. Fleming, 

R.A. Powell, T.R. Simons (Zoology), H.A. Devine, L. Gustke, R. Moore, B.E. Wilson (Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management), 

F.B. Hain (Entomology), L.E. Hinsley (Horticultural Science), D.E. Moreland (USDA-Crop Science), E.A. Wheeler (Wood and 

Paper Science), S.T. Warren (Multidisciplinary Studies). 

The undergraduate program of the Department of Forestry prepares students for professional challenges, personal growth, and a 
lifetime of service as managers of renewable natural resources. The curricula endeavor to produce well-educated forestry and natural 
resources graduates who have the basic knowledge, skills, fiexibility, and attitude needed for successful professional performance in 
a wide variety of career opportunities. Graduates will be prepared to face the challenges of competing uses of natural resources and 
the environment, and the pressures for increasing production of goods and services from natural ecosystems while maintaining their 
quality for future generations. 

The Department of Forestry strives to enroll and graduate a high-quality culturally and racially diverse student body to enhance the 
diversity and richness of forestry and natural resources professionals. Its academic curricula are enriched by out-of-class contacts 
among students, faculty, and practicing professionals, which promote a sense of professionalism and professional community. 
Gaining practical experience is encouraged through participation in summer employment and the cooperative education program. 




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The department has six Baehelor of Science programs: Forest Management. Natural Resources Ecosystem Assessment, Natural 
Resources-Policy and Administration, Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Environmental Sciences- Watershed Hydrology, and 
Environmental Technology. The Forest Management curriculum provides the broad-based forestry education needed for direct 

employment into positions in a wide variety of forestry or forestry-related organizations. The Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences 
curriculum provides specialization in biological science and management needed by non-profits, governmental agencies, and 
industries. The Natural Resources curricula provide more generalized, interdisciplinary programs in natural resources management 
that focus on the area indicated in the curriculum titles. The curriculum in Environmental Sciences Watershed Hydrology focuses on 
the specialized area of hydrologic science and watershed management. The Environmental Technology curriculum provides broad- 
bases and applied skills for the assessment and management of our society's impact on our environment. 

Instruction and practice in communications skills (both writing and speaking) are integrated into the required forestry (FOR) courses 
throughout the Forest Management curriculum and to a lesser extent in natural resources (NR) courses of the Natural Resources 
curriculum, and in several of the professional courses of the Environmental Sciences Watershed Hydrology curriculum. The 
communications-across-the-curriculum program produces graduates who are highly competent and confident in the communication 
skills needed by successful natural resource managers and en\ ironmental sciences professionals. 

The use of computers is integrated into all of the curricula in the department. Practical assignments on the use of computers as a tool 
in natural resource management are integrated into many of the advanced courses. The curriculum in Environmental Sciences 
Watershed Hydrology, in particular, has a very heavy emphasis on computer applications (including programming) throughout the 
general math and science courses as well as the advanced professional courses. 

Information on department programs may be obtained by contacting Ms. Kris Fowler, College of Natural Resources Recruiting 
Coordinator. NCSU, Box 8001. Raleigh, NC 27695-8001, phone (919)515-5510 or Dr. Joseph R Roise. Director of Undergraduate 
Programs, Department of Forestry, NCSU, Box 8008, Raleigh NC, 27695-8008, phone (919)515-7783, e-mail: joe_roise(« ncsu.edu. 

Scholarships 

The Department of Forestry annually awards four types of scholarships that are available to freshmen, transfers, and advanced 
students: Academic, Forestry Summer Camp, Industrial and Work-Study. About 35 Academic Scholarships varying between S3000 
and S4000 are av\ arded annually in April for the following academic year and are renewable provided that superior progress is made 
toward a degree. Nine endowments provide these awards: .lohn M. and Sally Blalock Beard. Edwin F. Conger, Hofmann Forest. 
James L. Goodwin, and Jonathan Wainhouse Memorial, and R.B. and Irene Jordan, Class of 1960, Duke Poer, Leonard Killian- 
National Association of Foresters. 

Five scholarships support students attending forestry summer camps. Each award provides $500-5900. Five endowments support 
these awards: Ralph C. Bryant. Victor W. Herlevick. Larry and Elsie Jervis. Maki-Gemmer-Johnson, and Donald Steensen. 

Four Industrial scholarships are available each year. In addition to cash awards of $2000, the Industrial Scholarships provide practical 
work experience w ith industrial forestry organizations. Industrial Scholarships are supported by grants from Canal Wood 
Corporation, Chesapeake Corporation, Georgia Pacific Corporation, and Squires Timber Company. 

Approximately 15 Work-Study Scholarships are awarded each year, generally to juniors and seniors. Work-Study Scholarships, 
currently at $2400 each, carry a work requirement, which is usually satisfied by assisting with operational activities on the college 
forests. This requirement means that recipients must be advanced students w ith some field skills. Four endowments provide these 
awards: Biltmore Forest, James L. Goodwin, George K. Slocum. and Dan K. Spears. 

Scholarship applications or questions should be directed to Dr. Richard Braham. Forestry Scholarship Coordinator 
phone: (919)515-7568, fex: (919)515-8149, e-mail: richardbrahamft ncsu.edu. 

Cooperative Education and Summer Work Experience 

Practical work experience is an important component of the professional degree programs in the Department of Forestry. Experience 
may be gained through participation in the Cooperati\e Education Program or through summer work. The department has close ties 
with a number of employers in the field of forestry and natural resources and provides placement assistance for the work experience 
programs. The Cooperative Education Program, which requires a minimum 2.25 GPA after at least one year of study for participation 
(many employers require a higher minimum), involves alternating semesters or summer periods on the job with semesters on campus 
for classes. A total of 12 months of work experience is required. Students who successfully complete the co-op program are in high 
demand by employers. Interested students should contact the department placement officer, Mr. Joseph Cox, phone: (919)515-7576, 
fax: (919)515-8149. e-mail: joe_cox(a ncsu.edu. 

Dual Degree Programs 

Students enrolled in one of the department's degree programs who have a strong interest in another degree topic may obtain a second 
baccalaureate degree in addition to the primary one. Such dual degree programs may be designed to provide a broader base in a 
related technical field such as wood products, or soil science or to broaden the student's know ledge and skills in a supporting field 
such as business, economics, sociology, or political science. Joint programs require coordination of the courses required in both 
curricula and the additional time required to complete them depends on the similarity between the curricula and the use of electives in 
one to satisfy required courses in the other. One to several extra semesters may be required to complete two degrees but expanded 
employment opportunities are a definite benefit. 

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Transfer Students 

The Department of Forestry accepts NC State students as on-campus transfers, as well as students from other accredited colleges and 
universities with good academic records. Students at community colleges, junior colleges, or other baccalaureate institutions who 
plan to transfer to one of the department's degree programs should closely follow the desired curriculum by taking the equivalent 
courses available. Only equivalent courses will be credited to the appropriate degree program after enrolling at NC State, and the time 
required to complete the degree will depend on the courses remaining in the degree track. Students applying for the Forest 
Management curriculum must have at least 30 credits equivalent to those in the freshman and sophomore years and must transfer here 
in the fall of the sophomore year in order to complete the courses required for summer camp. Fornial articulation agreements exist 
with the four forestry programs at North Carolina community colleges and those students do not need to attend Summer Camp. 
Questions about transfer procedures, admissions criteria, or courses should be directed to Dr. Joseph P. Roise, Director of 
Undergraduate Programs, phone: (919)5 1 5-7783, e-mail: joe roise@ncsu.edu. 

Curriculum in Forestry Management 

The curriculum in Forest Management is a professional program accredited by the Society of American Foresters that has long been 
ranked as one of the best among the 50+ such programs in the country. With a rigorous math and science base, the curriculum 
produces graduates with a broad education in the natural sciences, humanities and social sciences, communications skills, computer 
competency, and the technical knowledge and skills needed for sound management of the multiple resources of natural and managed 
forest ecosystems. Preparatory courses in the freshman and sophomore years are followed by the 10-week forestry summer camp 
where the woods knowledge and field skills that are essential for all foresters are acquired. Core courses of the junior and senior years 
focus on forest ecosystem processes, applied economics, operational practices in the forest stand management, measurement and 
analysis of forest stand components, policy issues in natural resource management and the management decision-making tools and 
skills needed to develop and implement forest management plans. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Opportunities 

Graduates in Forest Management are in demand by state and federal land-managing agencies, by industrial concerns growing wood 
as raw material, by state forestry and agriculture extension services, by forestry-related organizations such as nurseries and landscape 
management firms, and by urban natural resource management agencies. Some graduates, after acquiring professional forestry 
experience, are self-employed as consultants and as operators or owners of forestry-related businesses. Several recent graduates have 
become high school teachers, some have joined the Peace Corps, some are working in forestry-related sales and marketing and in 
financial management and others have joined environmental consulting firms. Many, of course, go on to graduate school to specialize 
in a wide variety of forestry and related programs. Employment opportunities are with the forest products industry, natural resource 
agencies, consulting firms, and environmental organizations. 

Forestry Summer Camp 

An intensive, full-time, 9-week summer camp experience, with forestry training in the Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and Mountain 
regions of North Carolina, is required in the Forest Management curriculum. The camp is based at the college's Hill Demonstration 
Forest with trips taken to other regions. Students take the summer camp after completion of the sophomore year and earn 9 semester 
credits for courses that provide a base of knowledge and skills for the advanced courses to come. 




Minor in Forest Management 

The Forest Management minor is open to all undergraduate degree students at NC State who are interested in learning the basics of 
the structure and functioning of forest ecosystems and the policies and practices of forest management. The minor will be useful to 
students in unrelated career fields that wish to have a better understanding of the scientific and policy issues involved in the sound 
stewardship of the nation's forests. The minor will be useful to students in related career fields who may be responsible for 
management of natural resources or interacting with foresters. 

The minor in Forest Management requires a minimum of 17 credit hours that includes two required courses, FOR 212 Dendrology 
and FOR 460 Renewable Resource Policy and Management, and 10 credits of elective courses. Students who wish instruction and 
field experience in forestry technical skills may choose to attend Forestry Summer Camp. For additional information, contact Dr. 
Joseph P Roise, Director of Undergraduate Programs phone: (919)515-7783. 

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Minor in Wetland Assessment 

The Undergraduate Minor in Wetland Assessment is an interdisciplinary, interdepartmental minor that is designed to provide NCSU 
graduates with the requisite knowledge of skills needed for entry-level competence in the field of wetland delineation and 
assessment. The soils, hydrology, and plant identification courses of the minor build the scientific background and skills needed to 
understand the staicture and functions of wetland ecosystems and to apply assessment protocols. The capstone course, NR 421 
Wetland Assessment, Delineation, and Regulation, focuses on further development of knowledge and skills in applying wetlands 
assessment, delineation, and regulation procedures. The Undergraduate Minor in Wetland Assessment consists of 1 7 credit hours. BO 
405 and FOR (NR) 420 are prerequisites of NR 421, and therefore, must be completed before enrolling in NR 421. 

Curricula in Natural Resources 

The two natural resources curricula offered by the Department of Forestry are components of the campus-wide baccalaureate degree 
program in Natural Resources. The curricula are designed to produce natural resources professionals with a broad interdisciplinary 
background coupled with a specific focus in natural resources management. The Natural Resources curricula will begin the program 
in a common introductory course, NR 100, and complete the program in a common junior course, NR 300, that focuses on natural 
resources measurements and a senior course, NR 400, that focuses on natural resource management. Those common courses will 
highlight the integrated nature of a broad tleld and provide experience in the important professional practice of working together in 
interdisciplinary teams. 

The curriculum in Natural Resources Ecosystem Assessment will produce graduates who have the knowledge and skills needed to 
inventory and describe the characteristics of natural ecosystems and evaluate the impacts of management practices. Ecosystem 
assessment or environmental impact assessment is an extremely important and somewhat specialized arena in the environmental field 
that requires individuals who understand ecosystem structure and processes; who can identify, measure, inventory, and describe 
ecosystems; and who can apply standard evaluation and classification systems such as wildlife habitat evaluation procedures and the 
federal wetland delineation criteria. To the strong science base of the core is added a concentration that provides advanced courses in 
sampling and measurement and in vegetation, soils, hydrology, and wildlife and fisheries. Many of the 400-level courses also address 
techniques and issues of natural resource management. 

The curriculum in Natural Resources Policy and Administration will produce graduates who have the knowledge and skills to 
manage natural resources programs in a variety of settings and organizations with an emphasis on public agencies. The advanced 
courses of the curriculum provide a broad background in economics, policy, government, public administration, and natural resources 
management. An economics track begins with introductory microeconomics and culminates with environmental economics and 
public finance. Courses in the various levels of government and public administration provide in-depth knowledge of how public 
institutions work. Courses in forestry, wildlife and fisheries, and outdoor recreation provide background on issues and techniques of 
managing natural ecosystems for various uses. A common thread of how public policy on natural resources is influenced and 
developed runs through many of the courses already noted and culminates in two senior courses that focus on policy. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Natural Resources Ecosystem Assessment 
Natural Resources Policy and Administration 

Opportunities 

Graduates with the kind of knowledge and expertise provided by the Natural Resources Ecosystem Assessment curriculum are 
needed in a variety of public agencies and private organizations that are involved in environmental regulation and management. 
Examples are the wetlands protection programs that are involved in environmental regulation and management. Such as the wetlands 
protection programs of the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Arniy Corps of Engineers and the various 
environmental regulatory programs of state and local governments. Private environmental consulting finns need entry-level 
professionals with broad skills in the field of environmental assessment. The broad natural resources background pro\'ided by this 
curriculum also provides a strong base for students who wish to go on to graduate school or environmental law or build additional 
specialties focused on specific job opportunities or career tracks. 

The curriculum in Natural Resources Policy and Administration is designed to produce administrators and managers for public 
agencies and private organizations that are involved with management, administration, policymaking, preservation, or regulation of 
natural resources. Examples are the USDl National Park Service, the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Geological 
Survey, state and local government agencies, and not-for-profit environmental organizations. The broad background in government, 
economics, policy, and natural resource management also provides a strong base for students who w ish to pursue a graduate program 
in the natural resources economics and policy arena. 

Curriculum in Environmental Sciences/Hydrology 

Hydrology is the science of water that is concerned with the origin, circulation, distribution, and properties of the waters of the earth. 
Watershed hydrology then is the application of that science to the study of the storage, movement, and quality of water in the context 
of the natural landscape unit, the watershed, and the etTects of man's activities on that water. The curriculum in Environmental 
Sciences, Watershed Hydrology will produce graduates who ha\e the knowledge and skills needed to analyze the hydrologic 
fijnctioning of watersheds, to plan and implement watershed management practices, and to deal with the ecologic, social, political, 
and economic aspects of water resources problems. The Environmental Sciences core provides a strong education in the basic 
physical, biological, and mathematical sciences; the humanities and social sciences; and the structure and functions of natural 
ecosystems. Advanced courses of the concentration in Watershed Hydrology focus on hydrologic processes in watershed; 

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applications of iiydrology in environmental management; skills of measurement, analysis, and communication; and computer 
applications. For information on entrance requirements for freshmen and transfer students, contact the program coordinator: Dr. 
James D. Gregory, Department of Forestry, NCSU, Box 8008, Raleigh, NC 27695-8008, phone: (919)515-7567, fax: (919)515-6193, 
e-mail: jim_gregory@ncsu.edu 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 




Opportunities 

The increasing stresses on water resources resulting from population growth will maintain demand for hydrologists in a variety of 
career positions. Hydrologists are needed in research, technical, environmental assessment and management positions in a variety of 
federal and state agencies and private organizations. The Environmental Sciences, Watershed Hydrology curriculum meets the 
criteria of the US Office of Personnel Management for the position of Hydrologist; therefore, graduates will be qualified to serve as 
hydrologists in federal agencies such as the US Geological Survey, US Forest Service, US Army Corps of Engineers, and the USDA 
Soil Conservation Service. State agencies such as the Office of Water Resources and the Division of Environmental Management are 
also excellent sources of employment. In the private sector, hydrologists are needed by environmental consulting firms and 
environmental organizations and by companies that own and manage large areas of forested, agricultural, or urbanized land. The 
rigorous scientific and quantitative background in the field of hydrology in this curriculum also provides excellent preparation for 
students who wish to pursue a graduate program in water resources. 

Curriculum in Environmental Technology 

Environmental Technology focuses on the assessment of impacts to the environment and the technology for managing those impacts. 
This curriculum prepares students to collect data on real world environmental problems, analyze and interpret those data, and 
detennine appropriate solutions, communications, and computer operation to acquire the technical knowledge and skills needed for 
sound environmental assessment and management. Many Environmental Technology courses emphasize hands-on training with 
state-of-the-art monitoring equipment. A parachuting to obtain actual working-world experience is required. Career opportunities 
include technical positions with: fmns that offer environmental services; manufacturing companies that are required to maintain 
sophisticated environmental monitoring networks; consulting and audit firms that perform independent environmental audits; and 
state and federal regulatory agencies. 

Opportunities 

Environmental Technology graduates have found a wide array of professional jobs including-Environmental Consulting Firms- Air, 
Water, Environmental Asse'ssment, Radiation Monitoring, State Government (DENR), Federal Government (EPA), Analytical 
Laboratories, Hospitals, non-profits, such as the Peace Corps. A number of graduates have also pursued graduate degrees. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Curricula in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences 

Program Coordinator: Dr. Richard A. Lancia, 

Box 7646, Forestry Department Turner House, 110 Brooks Avenue 

NC State University Raleigh, NC 27607 

Raleigh, NC 27695-7646 phone: (919)515-7586 

richard_lancia@ncsu.edu 

The Department of Forestry administers the Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences Program, which is shared with the Department of 
Zoology in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The undergraduate curriculum prepares the student for the Bachelor of 
Science in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences degree concentrating in either Fisheries Science or Wildlife Science. The program 
emphasizes ecological principles with socioeconomics in their application to natural resource management needs. A concerted effort 
is made to provide a thoroughly balanced approach to the study of wildlife, fisheries and aquaculture. Students observe and analyze 
systems at the population, community and ecosystem levels. Unique to the NC State Fisheries and Wildlife Program is the 
undergraduate six-week summer camp experience taught at Hill Forest, one hour from the NCSU campus. This course offers a period 
of intense study and practical application in fisheries and wildlife sciences, bringing many real-world concepts and techniques to 
fisheries and wildlife research and problem solving. 

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The Fisheries and Wildlife Program facilitates and provides opportunities for student internships, cooperative education and 
professional society interactions that are extremely valuable in preparation for future employment. Utilizing close associations with 
other learning institutions, private industry, and state and federal agencies, 60% of students obtain employment during their 
undergraduate program. Job placement activities and alumni tracking help assure that graduates may take the fullest advantage of 
their education. The Student Chapter of the Leopold Wildlife Club, and the North Carolina Chapter of the American Fisheries Society 
offer students in all levels of study the opportunity to network and leam from professionals in their chosen field. 

Opportunities 

Graduates are well integrated for post-graduate work and entry-level professional positions in government agencies, non-profit 
organizations and private industry. Students who graduate from the undergraduate curricula are prepared for certification by the 
Wildlife Society or the American Fisheries Society. 

Scholarships 

Thomas Quay Award 

The Thomas L. Quay Wildlife and Natural Resources Undergraduate Experiential Learning Award is available annually to highly 
motivated and qualified students majoring in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Environmental Science, or Natural Resources 
Ecosystem Assessment. The award honors Professor Emeritus Quay, a leader in conservation in North Carolina. The award will be 
provided in the form of a check directly to the winner at an awards ceremony during the semester prior to the experiential learning 
opportunity. 

Felton P. Coley 

This award was established by Durham Corporation in honor of Mr. Coley's 41 years of service. Students within Fisheries and 
Wildlife Sciences who are interested in wildlife conservation and management are considered. The scholarship is based on merit with 
consideration being given to financial need. One $1,750 award is made annually. 

Summer Camp Scholarships 

Several scholarships are given each year to students attending wildlife summer camp. Some awards are based on financial need, 
academic achievement and participation in the Leopold Club. The Carteret County Wildlife Club and the student chapter at NCSU of 
the American Fisheries Society generously provide summer camp scholarships. 

Camp Younts Foundation 

This scholarship, established in 1955 by members of the Camp family, supports educational opportunities for deserving individuals. 
Awards are based on academic achievement, professional promise, leadership potential, and financial need. Preference is given to 
students from Virginia and North Carolina. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg records/curricula 

DEPARTMENT OF PARKS, RECREATION AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT 

Biltmore Hall, Room 4008 
phone: (919)515-3276 
www.cfr.ncsu.edu/prtm/ 

D. Wellman, Head 

C. G. Vick, Undergraduate Coordinator 

B. Wilson, Graduate Coordinator 

Professors: H.A. Devine, P.E. Rea, CD. Siderelis, J.D. Wellman; Professors Emeriti: W.E. Smith, R.E. Stemloff, M.R. Warren; 
Associate Professors: A. Attarian, G.L. Brothers, L.D. Gustke, M.A. Kanters. R.L. Moore, C.G. Vick, B.E. Wilson; Visiting Research 
Associate Professor: P.K. Baran; Associate Professor Emeriti: C.C. Stott; Assistant Professors: L.J. Burton, Y. Leung, E.K. Lindsay; 
Instructor: K. Hamilton Brown; Visiting Instructor: D.E. Carter; Adjunct Instructor: G.R. Worls; Lecturers: A.C. Moore, R.W. Wade; 
Visiting Lecturers: J.I. Connors, J.B. Shields. S.K.. Tebbutt. 

The department oflers an interdisciplinary program allowing students to focus on careers in park management, recreation, tourism, 
golf management or sports. Standards adopted by the recreation profession make college graduation a requirement for employment. 
NC State University has an established reputation for comprehensive, professional education in the study of parks, recreation, 
tourism, golf and sport management. The program is nationally accredited. The department otTers a curriculum in Professional Golf 
Management and Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management. 

Opportunities 

As increased discretionary time becomes available for large segments of the American population, opportunities for growth in the 
leisure service professions have increased dramatically. A recreation and park professional's goal is to influence people to use their 
discretionarv' time wisely and to improve the quality of their lives. This goal is accomplished by providing recreation programs and 
facilities for people in a variety of settings. 



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College of Natural Resources 




Career opportunities include employment by park and recreation departments operated by county and municipal governments; state 
agencies, such as state parks; federal government, with agencies such as the National Park Service, Corps of Engineers, and U.S. 
Forest Service; resorts and country clubs; and sport agencies. 

Other major employers include youth and family service organizations, such as the YMCA, YWCA, Boy's Clubs, and Boy and Girl 
Scouts. Industries employ recreation directors to head employee recreation programs. Areas with perhaps the greatest growth 
potential for employment are tourism agencies and commercial recreation establishments, such as resorts, private clubs, theme parks, 
and convention and conference centers. Sport management is also a growing profession with a variety of career opportunities. 

Curriculum in Parks, Recreation and Tourism 
Management 

The curriculum in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management offers a 
broad, general education background, basic professional and technical 
courses, and the opportunity to specialize in a particular field. General 
education courses are in natural sciences, psychology, sociology, English, 
mathematics, communication, and economics. A specialized course is 
required in statistics. 

The curriculum is designed to prepare men and women for a variety of 
positions in a dynamic and challenging profession. The focus of the 
curriculum is on management rather than face-to-face leadership. The 
curriculum provides 37 hours of professional coursework that includes 
recreation philosophy, management techniques and skills, fiscal 
management, supervision, facility and site planning, programming, 

administration, and analysis and evaluation. A computer laboratory is utilized in many courses to provide the student with the best 

current technology available. 

In addition to the general education requirements and the core professional requirements, students can begin to attain specialized 
training through concentration courses. In the second semester of the student's sophomore year, they choose one of the following 
concentrations: tourism and commercial recreation, park and natural resource management, program management, or sport 
management. 

Academic studies on campus are supplemented by practical laboratory experiences in the Raleigh area, out-of-state field trips and 
study opportunities, and a 10-week internship with a park, recreation or tourism agency. Cooperative work-study programs are 
available. 

Concentrations 

Park and Natural Resource Recreation (18 hours, plus 6 hours of advised electives) 

Prepares students for positions planning, managing and maintaining parks and other natural resource oriented areas at the federal, 
state, regional or local levels and in settings ranging from primitive to urban. 

Required Courses (10 hours): 

Recreation and Park Interpretive Services 
Intro to Geographic Infonnation Systems 
Introduction to Ecology 
Ecology Lab 

Concentration Electives Courses (8 hours) 

Advised Electives Courses (6 hours): 

Select both Concentration Electives and Advised Electives from a recommended list. 

Tourism and Commercial Recreation (18 hours, plus 6 hours of advised electives) 

The tourism and commercial recreation concentration prepares students for positions in planning, marketing and managing tourism 
facilities, attractions, and products. The positions could be with private companies, nonprofit groups or public agencies. 

Required Courses (18 hours)*: 

Convention & Visitor Services (3) OR 
Resort Management & Operations (3) 
Managerial Accounting (3) 
Introduction to Business Processes (3) 
Special Events Planning (3) 
Services, Facilities and Event Marketing (3) 

Advised Elective (6 hours): 

Any two BUS courses at the 300 or 400 level. 

155 



PRT 


442 


PRT 


462 


BO 


360 


BO 


365 



PRT 


320 


PRT 


420 


ACC 


280 


BUS 


201 


PRT 


458 


PRT 


407 


PRT Elective* 



College of Natural Resources 



* Completion of all required business concentration courses, advised electives. and one additional business course will quality 
students to apply for a Minor in Business Management. Students are strongly encouraged to submit their application in accordance 
with guidelines outlined by the College of Management. 

** Any PRT course other than PRT core courses. 

Sport Management (18 hours, plus 6 hours of advised electives) 

Prepares students for positions in sports environments, including recreational sport administration, athletic administration, 
professional sports, sport marketing and sport tourism. 

Required Courses (18 hours)*: 

PRT 266 Introduction to Sport Management 

BUS/PRT 406 Sports Law 

PRT 407 Services, Facilities and Event Marketing 

PEC 479 Sport Management 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting 

BUS 201 Introduction to Business Processes 

Advised Electives (6 hours): 

Any two BUS courses at the 300 or 400 level. 

* Completion of all required business concentration courses and advised electives may qualify students to apply for a Minor in 
Business Management. Students are strongly encouraged to submit their application in accordance with guidelines outlined by the 
College of Management. 

Program Management Concentration (18 hours, plus 6 advised electives) 

Prepares students to develop and manage organized recreation activities for individuals and groups. 

Required Courses (9 hours): 

PRT 315 Org. and Admin, of Adventure Programs 
PRT 266 Introduction to Sport Management 
PRT 442 Interpretive Services 

PRT 458 Special Events Planning 

Concentration Electives Courses (9 hours) 

Advised Electives Courses (6 hours): 

Select both Concentration Electives and Advised Electives from a recommended list. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: wwvv.ncsu.edu/regrecords/curricula 

Curriculum in Profession Golf Management 

NC State University is one of a select few universities across the United States to offer a PGA of America Accredited Bachelor of 
Science degree in Professional Golf Management. Located in the heart of a great golf state. NC State's PGM program, in partnership 
with the College of Management, Turfgrass Management, Food Sciences, and Physical Education, is uniquely qualified to become 
one of the best in the nation. 

The golf profession today requires expertise in a variety of areas, including turfgrass management, retail operations and 
merchandising, food and beverage management, personnel management, accounting, risk management, marketing, and customer 
services in addition to teaching golf. A unique interdisciplinary combination of business, life sciences, physical education, parks, 
recreation and touinsm management courses, with extensive co-op experiences, will help students achieve competencies in each of 
the above areas. 

In addition to PGM course requirements, PGM students will complete 16 months of cooperative education at approved golf facilities. 
PGM students are also required to complete all requirements for levels one, two, and three of the PGA-Professional Golf 
Management Apprentice Program prior to graduation. Specific curriculum requirements for each level of the PGA-PGM Apprentice 
program are available at the following address: wwvv.pgaIinks.com/pro/program3. cfm#gptp 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 




156 



College of Natural Resources 



Minor in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management 

The academic minor in Paries, Recreation and Tourism Management is offered to students interested in gaining a basic knowledge of 
the parks, recreation and tourism fields and an understanding of the importance of leisure and recreation in American society. It is not 
intended to prepare students for a professional career in parks, recreation and tourism. Seven hours of required courses and nine hours 
of electives are necessary to complete the minor. The program provides a background in recreation and park management which is 
useful to students who will assume fiill-time careers associated with recreation and park services and become involved in the park 
and recreation field as a volunteer, program leader, or policy making board member with such organizations as the Scouts, Y's, art 
advisory councils, and conservation organizations. 

Admission 

Any undergraduate student enrolled in the university as a degree candidate is eligible for admission to the minor program. The 
undergraduate curriculum coordinator of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management will advise students regarding their plan of 
work and process all necessary records. 

Requirements for Admissions and Completion 

Students should see the minor adviser. Dr. Candace Goode Vick for both admission and certification of the minor. She can be reached 
at (919)515-7118, or candace goodefiimcsu.edu. The minor must be completed no later than the semester in which the student 
expects to graduate from his or her degree program. 

Paperwork for certification should be completed no later than during the registration period for the student's final semester at NC 
State. 

Requirements: 

A minimum of 15 hours (5 courses required to complete the minor in Park, Recreation & Tourism Management) 
Student must take six hours of required courses and nine hours of electives 
• A grade of "C-" or better is required in all courses to be used toward the minor. 

DEPARTMENT OF WOOD AND PAPER SCIENCE 

Biltmore Hall, Room 2105 
phone: (919)515-5807 

M.J. Kocurek, Head 

J. A. Heitmann, Director of Undergraduate and Graduate Programs 
M. Byrd, Undergraduate Coordinator, Paper Science and Engineering 
P. Peralta, Undergraduate Coordinator, Wood Products 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: M.W. Kelly; Alumni Distinguished 

Graduate Professor and Elis & Signe Olsson Professor: H. Jameel; Reuben B. 

Robertson Professor: H-M. Chang; Buckman Distinguished Scientist: M.A. Hubbe; 

Professors: D. Argyropoulos, H-M. Chang, J. Denig, J.A. Hietmann, Jr., H. Jameel, 

B. Kasal, M.W. Kelly, A.G. Kirkman, M.J. Kocurek, J.S. Stewart; Professors 

Emeriti: A.C. Barefoot, E.L. Deal, E.L. Ellwood. I.S. Goldstein, J.S. Gratzl, C.A. 

Hart, R.G Hitchings, L.G. Jahn, H.G. Olf, R.G. Pearson, R.J. Thomas, E.A. Wheeler; 

Adjunct Professors: L.L. Edwards, H.L. Hergert, T.W. Joyce, RJ. Kleppe, T.K. Kirk, J.J. Renard, R. Szymani; Associate Professors: 

M.A. Hubbe, P.H. Mitchell, RN. Peralta, I.S. Peszlen, M.K. Ramasubramanian, R. A.Venditti; Adjunct Associate Professors: E.K. 

Andrews, R.B. Phillips, H.A. Stewart; Associate Professors EmeriU: R.C. Allison, R.C. Gilmore, S.J. Hanover; Assistant Professors: 

U. Buehlmann, M.V. Byrd, J.J. Pawlak, O. Rojas; Adjunct Assistant Professor: R.C. Peters, A.G. Raymond, Jr.; Research Associates: 

R.L. Lemaster; Research Assistants: W.S. Bryan; Associate Member of the Faculty: R.D. Gilbert. 

The wood-based industry of North Carolina, as well as throughout the South, is a vital part of the nation's economy. In terms of the 
dollar value of shipments of wood and paper products, the South leads all regions of the country. North Carolina manufactures more 
wood household furniture than any other state, ranks third in shipment value for all wood and paper products, and is second in the 
number of employees and wages paid. Thus, many opportunities exist in North Carolina and other southern states for careers in the 
wood-based industry. 

The Department of Wood and Paper Science offers two curricula leading to Bachelor of Science degrees- Paper Science and 
Engineering, and Wood Products. Both curricula prepare men and women for careers in the wood, paper, and allied industries or in 
government agencies connected with wood resources. 

Curricula in Paper Science and Engineering 

M. Byrd, Undergraduate Coordinator 

The Paper Science and Engineering curriculum prepares students for careers in the paper industry, which ranks as the fifth-largest 
manufacturing industry in the United States. Science, engineering, and mathematics form the basis for a multidisciplinary approach 
to understanding the fundamental manufacturing principles involved. Students study the technology and engineering of wood pulping 
processes, chemical and by-product recovery systems, and pulp bleaching. In addition, various papermaking operations, such as 
refining, sizing, coating, and drying are studied. These topics along with the chemistry of wood, pulping, and papermaking, and the 

157 




College of Natural Resources 



physics of paper as it relates to product characteristics and design form a tundamentai core ol' courses that all students in the 
curriculum take. 

Two concentrations are available emphasizing the different engineering aspects of pulping and papermaking. The Paper Science and 
Engineering concentration provides an extensive background in the pulp and paper manufacturing processes and elective credit hours 
for studies in chemistry, marketing, economics, management or other areas of interest to the student. Greater depth in general 
chemical engineering principles can be obtained from the Chemical Engineering Concentration. Students who have completed the 
Chemical Engineering Concentration in Paper Science and Engineering can, in cooperation with the College of Engineering and with 
an additional semester of study, earn a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering as a second degree. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Paper Science and Engineering, Paper Science & Engineering Concentration 
Paper Science and Engineering, Chemical Engineering Concentration 

Opportunities 

Graduates of this curriculum find opportunities for challenging careers as process engineers, product development engineers, process 
control engineers, chemists, technical service engineers, quality control supervisors, and production supervisors. Design and 
construction engineering companies employ graduates as project engineers, and pulp and paper machinery companies use their 
education and skills for technical service and sales positions. Opportunities for managerial and executive positions are available to 
graduates as they gain experience. 

Summer Internship 

All paper science and engineering majors are required to work one summer in a pulp or paper manufacturing facility. One hour of 
academic credit is granted after completion of 12 weeks of this work and presentation of an engineering report of professional quality. 
In addition, students are urged to work in manufacturing facilities the other two summers, as the work provides valuable practical 
experience. Departmental advisors assist students in locating summer jobs, which are found throughout the US and some are even 
international. 

Regional Program 

The pulp and paper curriculum is a regional program approved by the Southern Regional Education Board as the undergraduate 
program to serve the Southeast in this field. 

Scholarships 

Approximately 125 undergraduate academic scholarships are granted annually to new and continuing students by more than 50 
companies comprising the Pulp and Paper Foundation. 

Minor in Paper Science and Engineering 

The Paper Science and Engineering Minor is available to all undergraduate students enrolled in the university as degree candidates, 
except Paper Science and Engineering Majors. The minor requires 15 credit hours. Six hours of required courses provide a 
comprehensive overview of pulping and papermaking science and technology, including pulping, bleaching, chemical recovery, 
recycled fibers, papermaking, coating, printing, converting, and paper properties. Nine elective hours may be chosen from areas 
including wood chemistry, wet end chemistry, unit operations, process design and analysis, project management, paper physics, 
process control, or to gain more in depth exposure to the basic pulping, bleaching, and paper making process. 

The Paper Science and Engineering Minor, with its focus on papermaking science and technology, is intended to be especially 
valuable to students majoring in programs leading to careers in corporate or government positions which would interface with the 
paper and related industries. Students interested in business, scientific or engineering specialties, which may interface with, or are 
employed by these industries will find the minor especially useful. 

Admissions and Certification of Minor 

All undergraduate students enrolled in the university as a degree candidate, other than PSE majors are eligible for admission to the 
PSE minor program. The PSE Minor Adviser will serve as adviser and certify completion of the minor. Paperwork for certification 
must be submitted to the minor adviser no later than the registration period for the student's final semester at NCSU. The minor must 
be completed no later than the semester in which the student expects to graduate fomi his or her degree program. Contact Person: Dr. 
John A. Heitmann. Minor Adviser. 2111 Biltmore Hall, (919)515-771 1 John heitmann((/ ncsu.edu 

Curriculum in Wood Products 

P. N. Peralta, Undergraduate Coordinator 

The wood products industry is of major importance to the economy of North Carolina and the Southeast. It ranks third in the state in 
the value of shipments, behind only textiles and tobacco products, and it is second to textiles in the number of employees. The career 
opportunities for graduates with a B.S. in Wood Products are excellent. The Wood Products curriculum is a material science 
curriculum based on the renewable, natural resource, wood. The anatomical, physical, mechanical, and chemical properties of the 



158 



College of Natural Resources 



material are emphasized and the 15 semester hours of technical electives and the 9 hours of free electives in the base curriculum 
allows the student to select courses to meet individual career goals. 

There are two concentrations available in Wood Products-- Manufacturing and Business Management. The Manufacturing 
concentration provides a concentrated exposure to Industrial engineering principles and practices. This concentration is for the Wood 
Products students who have as career goals either process and product engineering or upper level plant management in a large wood 
manufacturing company. Students competing the Manufacturing concentration earn a minor in Industrial Engineering. The Business 
Management concentration provides a concentrated exposure to business management practices, including financial and operations 
management, accounting practices, and marketing. This concentration is for the Wood Products students who have as career goals 
owning an enterprise or having responsibility for the business operations aspect of a company and who desire acquiring business 
management skills to complement the technical background in wood. Students completing the Business Management concentration 
earn a minor in Business Management. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg records/curricula 
Bachelor of Science in Wood Products. Business Management Option 
Bachelor of Science in Wood Products, Manufacturing Option 

Opportunities 

The Wood Products curriculum is accredited by the Society of Wood Science and Technology. Graduates have a strong foundation in 
the production and processing of wood products and find numerous opportunities for careers in the wood industry. Entry positions are 
frequently as quality control technicians in composite plants, process or product engineers in the furniture industry, or in sales with 
the huge supplier industries, such as finishes, equipment, glues, and hardware. Advancement to positions of increased responsibilities 
comes quickly to those with dedication and active involvement in career development. 

Scholarships 

There are seven endowed scholarships within the program and seven non-endowed industrial scholarships. These are awarded on 
merit through a selection process involving faculty and industrial representatives. 

Minor in Wood Products 

The Wood Products minor is available to all undergraduate students, except Wood Products majors, enrolled in the university as 
degree candidates. Due to the various semester credit hours of the elective courses, the semester hours required for this minor may be 
as low as 17 or as high as 20 credits. Eleven hours of required courses provide a general background in wood anatomy, physical 
properties, and wood-based composites. Elective courses (minimum two courses required) may be chosen from areas including wood 
processing, wood mechanics, quality control, and plant infrastructure. 

The Wood Products minor, with its focus on wood properties and processing, is designed to be especially valuable to students 
majoring in programs leading to careers in areas such as structural design, furniture manufacturing, and forestry. Students interested 
in natural and renewable materials will also tlnd the minor useful. 



159 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL AND 
MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 




104-122 Cox Hall 

NCSU Box 8201 

Raleigh, NC 27695-8201 

phone: (919)515-7833 

fax: (919)515-7855 

e-mail: pams(a ncsu.edu 

www.panis.ncsu.edu 



Daniel L. Solomon. Dean 

Raymond E. Fomes, Associate Dean, Research 

Jo-Ann Cohen, Associate Dean, Academic Affairs 



College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 



The College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences offers programs for students whose interests lie in the basic as well as the applied 
physical science and mathematical areas. These programs of study and research are offered at both the undergraduate and graduate 
levels and lead to many career opportunities. In addition, the college provides the core physical science and mathematical education 
support for the entire university. The college consists of five academic departments: Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, Statistics, and 
Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences. It jointly administers academic programs in Biochemistry with the College of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences. The Center for Research in Scientific Computation, the Institute of Statistics, the State Climate Office, and the 
Center for Marine Science and Technology are also associated in whole or in part with the college. 

Graduates of the college are in demand and valued for their well-developed analytical thinking and problem-solving skills. They are 
recruited for technical and administrative positions in industrial research and development laboratories, universities and colleges, 
non-profit research organizations, and government agencies. A large percentage of the graduates undertake advanced study in 
medical, law, business, or other professional schools as well as fijrther study leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. 

The high school student who enjoys computers, mathematics, statistics, chemistry, geology, marine science, meteorology, or physics; 
who has an interest in natural phenomena and their fundamental descriptions, and who hopes to make a difference in the quality of 
life should consider the career opportunities opened by degrees in the physical and mathematical sciences. 

Degree Programs 

The college offers undergraduate programs of study leading to the Bachelor of Science degree with majors in chemistry, geology, 
mathematics, applied mathematics, meteorology, natural resources, environmental sciences, physics, and statistics and the Bachelor 
of Arts degree with majors in geology, chemistry, and physics. In some programs, students may choose to highlight their studies with 
concentrations in compatible disciplines. For example, they may select an earth systems history concentration in geology; an air 
quality, geology, or statistics concentration in an environmental sciences curriculum; or marine and coastal resources concentration in 
a natural resources curriculum. 

Curricula within the college have similar freshman years enabling a freshman to change from one department to another in the 
college without loss of time. A time-limited Physical and Mathematical Sciences Undesignated (PMU) "curriculum" is offered to 
students who want to major in one of these curricula but have not yet made a decision. 

Minors are offered in geology, mathematics, meteorology, physics, and statistics. 

Pre-Medical Sciences 

Medical and dental schools as well as many other health-related professional schools have long regarded degree programs in the core 
physical and mathematical sciences as excellent preprofessional curricula. Some professional schools prefer the in-depth knowledge 
gained by this route over those curricula which offer a cursory view of a variety of topics. For further details, contact Ms. Jennette C. 
Herbert, Director of Undergraduate Enrollment. 

Dual Degree Programs 

Students may wish to earn bachelor's degrees in two fields within the college. Other students may wish to combine a bachelor's 
degree in the college with one in another NC State college. With effective planning a number of courses can satisfy core, general 
education, or elective requirements simultaneously in both degree programs. For example, many students choose to pursue 
simultaneous degrees in mathematics and mathematics education or one of the physical sciences and science education. 

Student Activities 

In addition to university-wide extracurricular activities and honor organizations, the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 
has student chapters of the following professional and honor organizations: Sigma Pi Sigma (Physics Honor Society); Society of 
Physics Students; Pi Mu Epsilon (National Mathematical Honor Fraternity); Society for Undergraduate Mathematics (A Student 
Chapter of the Mathematical Association of America); Phi Lambda Upsilon (National Honorary Chemical Society); American 
Chemical Society; National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers; Mu Sigma 
Rho (Statistics Honorary Society); Statistics Club; American Meteorological Society; Society of Mining Engineers/Society of 
Exploration Geophysicists (Geology Club); National Association of Environmental Professionals (Student Chapter); and the nation's 
first chapter of the Society of African-American Physical and Mathematical Scientists. 

Facilities 

Faculty and students within the college have access to an extensive array of computational and network services. Extensive use of 
computers to fulfill the daily task requirements encompasses word processing, e-mail, information access from the library and 
Internet, and the use of numerous specialized software tools. The college provides a large number of workstations for use by 
undergraduate and graduate majors and is a participant in the university's campus-wide workstation network. Individual departments 
either utilize these workstations or provide additional platforms for work with discipline specific programs; for example instruction 
or research in mathematics, statistics, satellite data acquisition and analysis, weather modeling, chemistry, or physics. Additionally, 
students have access to university facilities for additional workstations, peripherals, and services. There is a fully staffed help desk to 
assist students with problems that they might encounter. 



161 



College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 



Cooperative Education, Field Experience, and Undergraduate Research 

The college recognizes the value of career-related work experience to students and encourages its majors to avail themselves of such 
opportunities whenever possible. That experience may be gained through the university's Cooperative Education Program, 
department sponsored field experience, academic research, and summer employment. Advisers work with students to develop a plan 
of study that balances a challenging course load with appropriate extracurricular activities. 

Scholarships 

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences majors may be eligible for a variety of freshman and undergraduate college and 
departmental scholarships in addition to those administered at the university level. The awards are based on a combination of factors, 
with a strong emphasis on academic excellence. Some scholarships are renewable for up to four years, and some carry opportunities 
for significant career-related work experience. 

Community Outreach 

The college of Physical and Mathematical Sciences demonstrates its commitment to community outreach primarily through its 
Science House. The Science House offers programs for K-12 students and teachers to enhance their understanding of appreciation 
for. and involvement in mathematics and physical sciences. The Science House, located on the Centennial Campus, houses 
classrooms, laboratories and a teaching resource library. Vans from the Science House carry Science on the Road demonstration 
programs and teaching laboratory equipment to schools across North Carolina. 

Tutorial and Audio- Visual Assistance 

Most of the departments in College offer students some form of free tutorial assistance, including regularly scheduled review sessions 
and Supplemental Instruction (SI) for selected sections of chemistry, mathematics, and physics. Several departments provide 
facilities for students to use supplementary videotaped or computer assisted instructional materials on a voluntary basis. 

Graduate Study 

The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are available with majors in biomathematics, chemistry, marine, earth, and 
atmospheric sciences, mathematics, applied mathematics, statistics, and physics. The Master of Biomathematics, Master of 
Chemistry, and Master of Statistics are also offered. The Departments of Statistics, Mathematics, and Physics offer B.S.-M.S. 
programs which allow students to enroll in up to twelve credit hours of graduate level course work which may be applied toward the 
requirements of both the bachelor's and master's degrees. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Dabney Hall, Room 108 Undereraduate Science Teachina Laboratory 

phone: (919)515-2355 



B. M. Novak, Howard J. Schaeffer Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and 
Department Head 
K. W. Hanck, Associate Head and Director of Facilities 

C. B. Boss. Director of Undergraduate Studies 
E. F. Bowden, Director of Graduate Studies 
C. J. Wertz, Executive Otilcer 

Glaxo Distinguished University Professor: J.S. Lindsey; Alumni Distinguished 
Undergraduate Professor: A.J. Banks; Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate 
Professor Emeriti: F.C. Hentz, Jr., W.P. Tucker: Professors: E.F. Bowden, C.L. 
Bumgardner, D.L. Comins. B.E. Eaton, C.B. Gorman, K.W. Hanck, J.D. Martin, 
B.M. Novak, M.H. Khaledi, D.A. Shultz, G.H. Wahl, M-II. Whangbo, J.L. Whitten; 
Professors Emeriti: R.D. Bereman, H.H. Carmichael, L.D. Freedman. F.W. Getzen, 
R.H. Leoppert, S.G. Levine, G.G. Long, S.T. Purrington, A.F. Schreiner, E.O. 
Stejskal. R.C. White; Associate Professors: C.B. Boss, D.L. Feldheim, S.F. Franzen, 
A.l. Smimov, W.L. Switzer, J.L. White; Associate Professor Emeritus: T.C. Caves, Y. 
Hbisuzaki, D.W. Wertz; Assistant Professors: A. Deiters, T.B. Gunnoe, L. He, M.T. 
Oliver-Hoyo, PA. Maggard, Jr.. C. Melander, T.I. Smimova; Research Professor 
Emeritus: R.A. Osler>oung; Research Assistant Professors: M. Taniguchi. A.G. 
Tkachenko; Adjunct Professor: B. Wang; Associate Faculty: D.W. Brenner 
(Materials Science and Engineering); Lecturers: P.A. Brown, D.A. Canelas, J.C. 
Folmer, M.T. Gallardo-Williams. S.M. Hendrickson, G.A. Neyhart. L.M. Petrovich, 
K.A. Sandberg, L.E. Sremaniak, R.W. Warren; Lecturer Emeritus: S.L. Levine; 

Laboratory Supervisors: M.L. Belisle, P.D. Boyle, J.L. Burtness, H.S. Gracz, G.L. Hennessee, S.K. King, M.M. Lyndon, S.S. Sankar; 

Laboratory Demonstrator: S.G Cady; Teaching Technician: H.M. Simmons 




162 



College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 



Honors Program 

To be invited to join the Chemistry Honors Program at the end of the sophomore year, a student must have a GPA of 3.25 or higher. 
Only students in the Chemistry B.S. program will be invited to join. 

Chemistry Honors students must maintain a GPA of at least 3.25 to graduate with honors. In addition, the departmental requirements 
for students in the Honors Program are the completion of 9 extra credit hours of work that is NOT required for their degree(s). 
Between 3-6 credit hours can come from research conducted in laboratories in the Department of Chemistry. Research in other 
laboratories of molecular sciences may also be considered. However, in the latter case, prior approval is required. A 3-page report and 
a letter from the supervisor indicating the nature of the work, time spent in the lab, and performances are required at the end (before 
finals week) of the semester, in which the research is conducted. It should be noted that simply working in a research lab does not 
necessarily meet the requirements of the Honors Program. The nature of the work must be meaningful research. The rest of the credit 
hour requirements can be met with 500 level or higher courses in cheinistry, biochemistry, polymer sciences, materials sciences, 
biotechnological sciences and pharmacological sciences. Courses in other subject areas may be considered. However, prior approval 
is required. If you are in doubt as to whether a particular course will count toward the Chemistry Honors Program, please contact 
Professor T. Brent Gunnoe at brent_gunnoe@ncsu.edu. 

Curricula 

The B.A. program offers a flexible course of studies for students who may not plan to become professional chemists but who desire 
an interdisciplinary program with an emphasis on chemistry. The proper choice of electives will prepare the graduate for any of the 
following: medical, veterinary or dental school; work in chemical sales and management; teaching in secondary schools; work in 
environmental science; or graduate school in an allied science. Since the first three semesters are essentially identical to those of the 
B.S. program, students may enter the B.A. program either directly from high school or some later point after entering the university. 

The B.S. curriculum, accredited by the American Chemical Society, includes a strong, broad background in mathematics, physics, 
and the liberal arts. The basic areas of organic, physical, inorganic, and analytical chemistry are stressed. Laboratory and classroom 
work develop the skills, knowledge, and inquiring spirit necessary for a successful career in chemistry. The advised elective credits 
allow individual diversity at the junior and senior levels. Many undergraduates participate in current departmental research through 
part-time employment or research projects. The B.S. curriculum prepares the student to enter the job market directly as a chemist or 
to enter various professional schools or graduate school in chemistry or an allied science. This route is also an excellent premedical 
program. 

The Bachelor of Science in Chemistry-Marine Sciences Concentration provides students the knowledge associated with a B.S. degree 
in Chemistry, but also applies that knowledge to a natural environmental setting (in this case, the marine environment). Many 
students have an environmental awareness and a desire to pursue environmental issues along with their interest in physical science. 
This degree allows a student to take all of the courses necessary to become an accredited ACS (American Chemical Society) chemist 
along with the oceanography courses necessary to apply that chemical information to an interesting and complex environment like 
the ocean. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Curriculum in Chemistry, Bachelor of Arts 
Curriculum in Chemistry, Bachelor of Science 
Curriculum in Chemistry, Marine Sciences Concentration 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Harrelson Hall, Room 360 
phone: (919)515-2382 

B. A. Mair, Department Head 

J. E. Franke, Associate Head 

J. S. Scroggs, Director of Undergraduate Programs 

J. R. Griggs, Coordinator of Classroom Instruction 

H. J. Charlton, Scheduling Officer and Director of Summer School 

Professors: H.T. Banks, S.L. Campbell, M.T. Chu. E.N. Chukwu, L.O. Chung, J.D. Cohen, A. Fauntleroy, J.P Fouque, J.E. Franke, 
R.O. Fulp, R.E. Hartwig, A.G. Helminck, H. Hong, 1. Ipsen, K. Ito, N. Jing, E.L. Kaltofen, C.T. Kelley, A. Kheyfets, K. Koh, X.B. 
Lin, B.A. Mair, R. H. Martin, N. Medhin, CD. Meyer. K.C. Misra, E.L. Peterson, M.S. Putcha, S. Schecter, J.F. Selgrade, F.H.M. 
Semazzi, M. Shearer, C.E, Siewert, J.W. Silverstein, M. Singer, R. Smith, E.L. Stitzinger, H.T. Tran, R.E. White; Adjunct Professors: 
E.M. Peck, P. Schlosser; Professor Emeriti: J.W. Bishir, E.E. Bumiston, R.E. Chandler, J.C. Dunn, J. Luh, L.B. Martin, C.V. Pao, N.J. 
Rose; Associate Professors: G.D. Faulkner, PA. Gremaud, T. Lada, Z. Li. A.Lloyd, S. Lubkin, L.K. Norris, L.B. Page, S.O. Paur, J. 
Rodriguez, J.S. Scroggs, S. Tsynkov, W.M. Waters; Associate Professor Emeritus: R.T. Ramsay; Assistant Professors: B. Bakalov, R. 
Buche, H.J. Charlton, A. Chertock, M.A. Haider, K. Jenssen, M. Kang, 1. Kogan, D. Labate, M.S. Olufsen, T. Pang, A. Szanto, D. 
Zenkov; Assistant Professor Emeritus: D.J. Hansen; Lecturers: S.S. Al-Ashhab, B. Bums-Williams, R. Kenney, J.R. Griggs, M.S. 
McCollum, A. McRae. 

The undergraduate majors in mathematics and applied mathematics provide a core of basic mathematics courses along with flexible 
choices of electives, which permit both a well-rounded education and preparation for math-related careers. Because of the current 

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employment market (tor both baccalaureate and graduate students), students are advised to give serious consideration to the applied 
mathematics program. 

Career objectives can be directed toward employment in math-related jobs in business industry or government, teaching at the 
secondary school level, or graduate study in mathematics and/or related areas. 




Facilities and Laboratories 

The math department houses a media center which provides a wide variety of support services 
to students and faculty. The center consists of a computer classroom with 20 Sun 
workstations, a Macintosh equipped room with computer equipped carrels for individual 
work, and a large table for tutoring and group work. Both rooms are adjacent to PAMS 
computer labs housing Sun and Linux workstations. 

In addition, Harrelson 314 and Harrelson G 108 are large PAMS computer rooms which are 
heavily used by the math department for computer testing and classroom computer work. 
These rooms are particularly heavily used by the engineering calculus classes for 
mathematical computing, and by online math classes for computer-based testing. 

For students, the media center is the focal point for all computer work related to math classes 
at NCSU. Students go to the media center for individual work, tutoring, and class meetings. 
The proximity of the media center to PAMS computer labs means that students working in the 
PAMS labs have quick access to all support services provided by the media center. 

The media center also houses a large collection of videotapes for introductory level math 
classes. These, however, are in the process of being phased out as a newer digital video library 
is under development. 



Student Activities 

The Society for Undergraduate Mathematics is a club for all students interested in mathematics, and is a Student Chapter of the 
Mathematical Association of America. Club activities include monthly meetings and participation in regional and national 
professional activities. 

Undergraduates in the Mathematics Department can participate in research programs with members of our faculty. In addition, many 
mathematics majors participate in otY-campus programs, such as the NSF sponsored Research Experience for Undergraduates and the 
Budapest Semester in Mathematics. 

Finally, undergraduate mathematics major can participate in local, regional and national mathematics contests. Many of our students 
perform well in these contests, and several have received national recognition. 

Honors and Awards 

The department recognizes its superior students with the following annual awards: 

Hubert V. and Mary Alice Park Scholarship- An award made to an outstanding rising junior or senior in mathematics. 

• John W. Cell Scholarship- An award for an outstanding rising junior or senior in mathematics. 

Carey Mumford Scholarship- An award to an outstanding sophomore, junior, or senior in mathematics. 

• Levine-Anderson Award- An award for that student who has the best performance in the William Lowell Putnam Examination. 
(This award is not restricted to mathematics majors) 

• Charles N. Anderson Scholarship- An award for an outstanding sophomore in mathematics. 

Charles F. Lewis Scholarship- An award for an outstanding senior who is a double major in mathematics/mathematics education. 
Mrs. Roberts C. Bullock Scholarship - An award for an outstanding mathematics major who has also demonstrated an interest in 
the English language. 

• Dr. Rebecca R. Bullock Memorial Scholarship Endowment- An award for an outstanding mathematics major who has also 
demonstrated an interest in the English language. 

• Howard A. Petrea Scholarship- An award for an outstanding junior or senior in mathematics. 

The department also has a chapter of the National Mathematical Honorary Fraternity Pi Mu Epsilon. Membership is open to those 
students with superior performance in mathematics courses. 

Curricula 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Curriculum in Mathematics, Bachelor of Science 
Curriculum in Applied Mathematics, Bachelor of Science 



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Minor in Mathematics 

The minor program consists of the successful completion with a grade of C- or better of any 15 hours selected from the Mathematics 
Department's list of approved courses. The list includes MA 225 Foundations of Advanced Mathematics as well as any MA courses 
at the 300, 400, and 500 levels. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Cox Hall, Room 110 
phone: (919)515-2521 

C. R. Gould, Head 

R. A. Egler, Assistant Head 

C. E. Johnson, Director of Undergraduate Programs 

M. A. Paesler, Director of Graduate Programs 

Named Professor: D.E. Aspnes, J. Bemholc, G Lucovsky; Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor: G.E. Mitchell, R.J. Nemanich; 
Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: R.J. Beichner, C.R. Gould, D.G Haase, R.R. Patty, S.P. Reynolds; Professors: H. 
Ade, D.E. Aspnes, R.J. Beichner, J. Bemholc, J.M. Blondin, R. Chabay, S.R. Cotanch, D.C. Ellison, R.E. Fomes, C.R. Gould, D.G. 
Haase, C.R. Ji, C.E. Johnson, J. Krim, F. Lado Jr., G Lucovsky, G.E. Mitchell, J.R. Mowat, R.J. Nemanich, M.A. Paesler, S.P. 
Reynolds, J.S. Risley, CM. Roland, D.E. Sayers; Professors Emeriti: J.W. Cook, K.T. Chung, W.R. Davis, W.O. Doggett, GL. Hall, 
A.W. Jenkins, K.L. Johnston, GH. Katzin, E.R. Manning. J.D. Memory, J.Y. Park, R.R. Patty, J.F. Schetzina, L.W. Seagondollar, PJ. 
Stiles, D.R. Tilley; Associate Professors: J.D. Brown, H. Hallen, P.R. Huffman, M.A. Klenin, L. Mitras, G.W. Parker, T.M. Schaefer, 
A.R. Young; Associate Professor Emeritus: C.G Cobb, D.H. Martin; Assistant Professors: M. Buongiomo-Nardelli, L.l. Clarke, D.J. 
Lee, G. McLaughlin, T.P. Pearl, M.C. Sagui, K.. Weninger; Assistant Professor Emeritus: H.L. Owen. 

Physics is the ftindamental science of observation, measurement and description of the natural world. Physicists seek to establish a 
mathematical description of all physical phenomena, ranging from the interactions of quarks in nuclei to the collisions of galaxies in 
the universe. Together with scientists in engineering and other physical, biological, and mathematical sciences, physicists collaborate 
to develop new materials and new insights in all areas of modem science and technology. 

Curricula 

The Physics undergraduate curricula provide a strong background in the fundamentals, and offers course options for deeper studies in 
areas of interest. Undergraduates have the opportunity to work in research laboratories with faculty in: astrophysics, atomic physics, 
biological physics, physics education, nuclear and particle physics, synchrotron radiation, near-field optics, and materials physics, 
solid-state and condensed-matter physics. Undergraduates are frequently co-authors on scientific papers. Physics majors are part of a 
close-knit community- a small highly motivated group of people who have wide-ranging interests and a passion for solving problems. 

Bachelor of Science in Physics 

This degree equips students with a broad technical background, providing a solid basis for graduate study in physics or related 
sciences, enrollment in professional schools such as law or medicine, and employment in govemment or industrial laboratories. 
Specialized concentrations within the B.S. degree are also available in Material Sciences and Computational Physics. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Bachelor of Arts in Physics 

This degree offers a flexible course of studies for students who may not plan to become professional physicists but who desire an 
interdisciplinary program with a strong emphasis on physics. The proper choice of electives will help to prepare the graduate for 
professional careers in education, law, business, journalism, or graduate school in an allied science. It is especially suitable as part of 
a double major or as preparation for high-school teaching. Since the first three semesters are essentially identical to those of the B.S. 
program, students may enter the B.A. program either directly from high school or at some later point after entering the university. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Honors Programs 

The Physics Department Honors Program offers students the opportunity to develop their academic potential by increased 
involvement and participation in physics study and research. A minimum GPA of 3.5 in physics courses and overall GPA of 3.0 is 
required for admission. Students must complete three (3) hours of PY 499, Independent Research, and submit a written scientific 
report based on the student's research. Students must also complete an additional nine (9) hours of upper-level physics courses drawn 
from the following two categories: 300- and 400- level physics courses taken with the faculty-initiated honors option, and 500-level 
physics courses. 



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Minor in Physics 

The Physics Department otVers a minor in physics to majors in any field except physics. To complete the minor, 1 7 hours of specified 
physics courses are required, consisting of PY 205, 208, 407 (or 201, 202, 203) and two of PY 328, 341, 401, 402, 41 1, 412, 413, 414, 
415. 

DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS 

Patterson Hall, Room 220 
phone: (919)515-2528 

S. G. Pantula. Head 

W. H. Swallow, Director of Graduate Programs for Statistics 

C. E. Smith, Interim Director of Biomathematics Graduate Program 

M. L. Gumpertz, Director of Undergraduate Programs in Statistics 

William Neal Reynolds Professor: B.S. Weir; Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor: B.B. Bhattacharyya, M. Davidian; Alumni 
Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: E.J. Dietz, W.H. Swallow; Professors: R.L. Berger, P. Bloomfield, D.D. Boos, C. Brownie, 
D.A. Dickey, T.M. Gerig. M.L. Gumpertz, J.F. Monahan, S.G Pantula, K.H. Pollock, D.L. Solomon, L.A. Stefanski, A. A. Tsiatis, S- 
B. Zeng; Adjunct Professors: J.R. Chromy, J.H. Goodnight, P.D. Haaland, N. Kaplan; Professors Emeriti: F. Giesbrecht, A.H.E. 
Grandage, T. Johnson. L.A. Nelson, C.H. Proctor. C.P. Quesenberry, J.O. Rawlings, D.L. Ridgeway, R.G.D. Steel, J.L. Wasik, O. 
Wesler; Associate Professors: P. Arroway. S. Browning, M. Fuentes, M.G. Genton, J.M. Hughes-Oliver, A. Lloyd, S.R. Lubkin, S.V. 
Muse; Assistant Professors: P.J. Arroway, S. Ghosal, K. Gross, W. Lu, J. A. Osborne, J. Tzeng, D. Zhang, H. Zhang; Research 
Assistant Professor: D.M. Nielsen, J.R. Thompson, R. Woodard; Adjunct Assistant Professor: M.A. O'Connell; Assistant Professor 
Emeritus: B.J. Stines; Research Associate Statistician: A. Anderson: Senior Statistician: C.J. Basten, S.B. Donaghy; Associate 
Members of the Statistics Faculty: W.R. Atchley (Genetics), T.H. Emigh (Genetics), M.M. Goodman (Crop Science), A.R. Hall 
(Economics), M.W. Suh (Textiles); Associate Members of the Biomathematics Faculty: H.T. Banks (Mathematics), J.W. Bishir 
(Mathematics), J.F. Gilliam (Zoology), GR. Hess (Forestry), T. Johnson (Economics), D.W. Nychka (Statistics), H.E. Schaffer 
(Genetics), J.F. Selgrade (Mathematics), R.E. Stinner( Entomology), H.T. Tran (Mathematics), G.G. Wilkerson (Crop Science); 
Adjunct Professor of Biomathematics: L.B. Crowder. P. Dixon. P.H. Morgan; Adjunct Associate Professor of Biomathematics: T.K. 
Pierson; Adjust Assistant Professors of Biomathematics: J.S. Kimbell, M.M. Lutz. 

Statistics is the body of scientific methodology that deals with the logic of experiment and survey design, the efficient collection and 
presentation of quantitative information, and the formulation of valid and reliable inferences from sample data. The computer is used 
as a research tool by the statistician to perform the tasks of management and analysis of data collected from experiments and surveys. 
The Department of Statistics is part of the Institute of Statistics, which includes Department of Biostatistics and Statistics at Chapel 
Hill. The Department of Statistics provides instniction. consultation, and computational services on research projects for other 
departments of all colleges at North Carolina State University including the Agricultural Research Service. Department staff are 
engaged in research in statistical theory and methodology. This range of activities furnishes a professional environment for training 
and students in the use of statistical procedures in the physical, biological and social sciences in industrial research and development. 

Opportunities 

The importance of sound statistical thinking in the design and analysis of quantitative studies is generally recognized and is reflected 
in the abundance of job opportunities for statisticians. Industry relies on statistical methods to control the quality of goods in the 
process of manufacturing and to detennine the acceptability of goods produced. Statistical procedures based on scientific sampling 
have become basic tools in such diverse fields as weather forecasting, opinion polling, crop and livestock estimation, and business 
trends prediction. Because one can improve the efficiency and use of increasingly complex and expensive experiment and survey 
data, the statistician is in demand wherever quantitative studies are conducted. 

Scholarships and Awards 

The Department of Statistics recognizes the importance of superior academic performance through the awarding of scholarships and 
certificates of merit. Scholarships are available for the freshman year for the purpose of attracting academically superior students. 
There are two named departmental scholarships: F.E. McVay Scholarships and SAS Institute Scholarships. The department's NSF 
VIGRE program provides advanced training and support for outstanding juniors and seniors. The North Carolina Sate University 
chapter of Mu Sigma Rho, the national statistics honorary fraternity, accepts as members students who have had superior 
performance in statistics courses. Also, outstanding senior statistics students are recognized through the awarding of engraved 
plaques. 

Honors Program 

The Department of Statistics allows exceptional undergraduate students to design a program of study that typically includes advanced 
courses not ordinarily taken by statistics majors and one or two semesters of independent study or research. Students in the program 
complete a minimum of 9 credit hours in courses drawn from at least two of the following three categories: MA 245. MA 246. or 
other courses designated as appropriate by the honors adviser, 500-level courses in statistics or mathematics, and 400- or 500-level 
courses in independent study. Interested students should contact the Honors Adviser in the statistics department for additional 
information. 



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Curricula 

The undergraduate curriculum provides basic training for a career in statistics or for graduate study and leads to the Bachelor of 
Science in Statistics. In addition to statistics, the curriculum includes study in mathematics, computer science, and the biological/ 
physical sciences. While fulfilling their major elective requirements, students can either elect a minor or distribute their study across 
fields exploring the application of statistics in other fields, such as agriculture and life sciences, computer science, economics and 
business, industrial engineering, and the social sciences. A cooperative work-study option is also available. 

The Department of Statistics also advises for the Environmental Sciences, Statistics Concentration major. The environmental 
sciences, whether concerned with basic research or monitoring the status of environmental health, are heavily involved in 
experimental and/or sampling design, collection of data, data analysis and interpretation. Statistics is the science of designing 
efficient studies for the collection of data to address specific research questions, and the analysis of these data to provide 
understanding of the nature of the process or population under study. It is important that environmental scientists by aware of the role 
of statistics in research and be familiar with basic statistical methods in order to properly plan and execute these studies. The 
Statistics Concentration will prepare students to perform and the junior statistician level so they can become intimately involved in 
the research process and in the ideal situation become a full member of the interdisciplinary research team attacking the 
environmental problem. Successful completion of the Environmental Sciences, Statistics Concentration will prepare students for 
graduate study. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Curriculum in Statistics, Bachelor of Science 

Curriculum in Environmental Sciences, Statistics Concentration 

Minor in Statistics 

The Department of Statistics offers a minor in statistics to majors in any field except statistics. The importance of statistical reasoning 
to solve real world problems has been recognized by the business, government, and scientific communities. This minor program will 
provide students with an opportunity to become competent in the use of statistical methods to summarize information and/or provide 
answers to policy/research questions. Students completing this program of study will also be provided with experience in the use of 
the computer as a statistical tool. The typical minor program consists of the successfiil completion of ST 301-302, ST 371-372 or ST 
42 1-422, and one other approved Department of Statistics course with a grade of C or better in each course. Other sets of five courses 
may be acceptable; see the Director of Undergraduate Programs. 

DEPARTMENT OF MARINE, EARTH AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 

Jordan Hall, Room 1 125 
phone: (919)515-3711 

J. C. Fountain, Head 

C.J. Thomas, Sponsored Program Development Director 

D. L. Wolcott, Undergraduate Director and Marine Sciences Undergraduate Program 

E. F. Stoddard, Geology Undergraduate Program 

A. J. Riordan, Meteorology Undergraduate Programs 

University Distinguished Scholars: R. Braham, T. F. Malone; Scholar in Residence; Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: 

V. V. Cavaroc, Jr. Emeritus, E. C. Knowles Emeritus; Professors: V. P. Aneja, S. P. Arya, N. Blair, J. M. Davis, D. J. DeMaster, R.V. 

Fodor, J.P Hibbard, G.S. Janowitz, D. L. Kamykowski, Y. L. Lin, J. M. Morrison, S. Raman, V.K. Saxena, F. H. M. Semazzi, T. G. 

Wolcott; Adjunct Professors: S.W. Chang, W. J. Cooper, J. J. DeLuisi. A. H. Hines, S. K. Leduc, R. V. Madala, S.T. Rao, R.W. 

Reynolds, S. R. Riggs, M. L. Strobel, John T. Wells; Professors Emeriti; H.S. Brown, V. V. Cavaroc, L.J. Langfelder, C.J. Leith, J.M. 

Parker, W. J. Saucier, C. Welby; Research Professors Emeriti: T.S. Hopkins, D.A. Russell; Associate Professor Emeritus: GF. 

Watson; Associate Professors:, D. B. Eggleston, D. Genereux. M. M. Kimberley, 

E. L. Leithold. A. J. Riordan, P T. Shaw, W. J. Showers, E. F. Stoddard, D. L. Wolcott, L. Xie; Research Professors: T. F. Clark, H. G. 

Reichlel; Research Associate Professors: E. M. Buckley, 

M. Kaplan; Visiting Research Associate Professors: D. S. Kim; Adjunct Associate Professors: 

D. Byun, C. A. Davis, B. K. Eder, D. G Evans, R. S. Harmon, P. S. Kasibhatla, L. A. Levin, 

R. Mathur, H. Mitasova, C. R. Tomas, R. W. Weiner; Assistant Professor: C.N. Cudaback, 

G Lackmann, J. Liu, M.H. Schweitzer, Y. Zhang; Visiting Assistant Professors: C. J. Thomas; Research Assistant Professor: D. S. 

Niyogi; Adjunct Assistant Professors: K.V. Alapaty, 

R.E. Barrick, L.D. Carey, D.M. Checkley, C.J. Coats, A. S. Frankel. A. F. Hanna, J.A. Hare, 

T. Holt, C. Jang, G T. Kellison, G. J. Kilpatrick, A. J. Lewitus, J. E. McNinch, J. C. Reid, 

P. A. Roelle, S. W. Ross, B. Subrahmanyam, R. C. Tacker; Lecturer: C.E.S. Bartek; Visiting Assistant Faculty: F.M. Bingham, L.B. 

Cahoon, N.F. Hadley, D.G Lundquist, J.F. Pamell, 

J. Pawlik, M. Posey, P.J. Robinson, R.D. Roer, J.D. Wiley; Visiting Scholar: J.N. McHenry; Adjunct Instructor: R.M. Wooten 

The Department of MEAS covers a broad range of disciplines with one overarching goal: a 

deeper understanding of the Earth's environment. MEAS takes an interdisciplinary approach to studying our planet's air, earth and 

water, combining meteorology, earth science, and oceanography in a single department. 



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This interdisciplinary viewpoint is particularly important today, in light of accelerating global changes and increasing coiporate and 
public interest in environmental health aiul w isc use of natural resources. Many pressing questions require more than narrow training 
in a single discipline. MEAS graduates can he ci.|uipped for tasks as diverse as impros ing severe storm forecasting; assessing 
potential effects of oil exploration; modeling global climate trends or coastal Hooding; understanding the transport of tree-killing air 
pollutants from industrial centers to the North Carolina mountains; developing non-polluting technology for mining; ascertaining 
dinosaurian physiology and ecological niches; investigating global ozone depletion, or devising plans to minimize erosion and 
pollution of coastlines. 

MEAS offers degrees in meteorology, geology, marine sciences, environmental sciences and natural resources. Marine science 
majors learn how the oceans, solid earth, and atmosphere interact. Marine sciences courses are highly interdisciplinary and are 
available in chemical oceanography, physical oceanography, biological oceanography, coastal geology, and marine meteorology. 
Earth science courses encompass the entire earth, from the core, through the crust, to the minerals, sediments, ground water, and land 
forms of the surface. Tools learned allow students to understand and characterize the physical and historical earth. Course work in all 
areas of geology equips students to reduce potential disasters from geological hazards and to ameliorate the negative impact of 
human society on the geological resources of the earth. An earth systems history concentration produces graduates knowledgeable 
about the evolution of the earth ecosystems. The meteorology program stresses a quantitative understanding of atmospheric structure 
and processes. It addresses problems like air pollution, climate changes, and severe weather, such as thunderstorms, tornadoes, winter 
storms, and hurricanes. Forecasting and climate studies are enhanced by using real-time satellite imagery, radar-data products, and 
state-of-the-art computer technology. MEAS majors in Environmental Sciences and Natural Resources fill a unique need in today's 
society as experts who can interpret their science to public policy shapers and decision makers. The training they receive in 
economics, political science, and policy issues, and management, (for Natural Resources majors) equips MEAS graduates to interact 
with industry, and with regulatory and conservation agencies. 

Planet Earth is MEAS's natural laboratory. While most scientists conduct experiments under controlled conditions designed to 
replicate some facets of nature, we use ships, submarines, aircraft, and satellites and unattended monitoring instruments to directly 
and remotely probe the natural environment itself Computer modeling helps us visualize the real-world information, and to design 
the next experiments. Field study is an integral part of MEAS educational programs, enabling students to apply concepts learned in 
the classroom to projects in the field. Summer field courses take students to the Southwest or to the North Carolina coast for intensive 
training in field methods. Shorter field trips are part of classes in all disciplines. 

Opportunities 

MEAS undergraduate degree programs provide talented students with the foundation of scientific knowledge for careers in 
government, industry or academe. Many students pursue graduate degrees. 

Marine Sciences graduates can go on to become oceanographers, to manage our coastal resources, model air-sea interaction, and 
explore global climate change. They may conduct pure and applied research, serving as environmental consultants for industry and 
governmental agencies, policy and management experts for governmental agencies, and environmental science educators. Graduates 
with a Natural Resources degree are versed in the fundamental processes and interdisciplinary nature of the coastal zone. As 
scientists, managers, administrators, and regulators, they make decisions regarding use and conservation of coastal and marine 
resources. 

Geology graduates address society's needs for dealing effectively with earth processes, such as water supply and water quality (from 
residential and industrial supply and disposal, to ecosystem health in rivers and estuaries), or assessment of stability of land forms. 
They work for engineering firms and permit-issuing agencies, and they are recruited by industries that rely on geological resources. 
Earth systems history geologists are familiar with the evolution of ecosystems through time, and provide a perspective on potential 
long-term reactions of the biosphere to both past and current changes and stresses. Their expertise is used in education, including 
museums, and in theoretical and practical study of biosphere response. Those with Environmental Science degrees are trained to 
assess and monitor geological resources like ground water contamination. Marine geologists are experts in the complex issues facing 
industry, municipalities and residents in the dynamic and ecologically vulnerable coastal zone. 

Meteorology graduates may enjoy careers in areas such as weather forecasting, air quality assessment, development of weather 
products and services, broadcast communications, and advanced research. Marine meteorologists study ocean-generated weather 
systems. Their research is yielding practical benefits like refined prediction of storm surge, which has streamlined evacuation efforts 
during severe storms along the Carolina coast. Environmental Sciences graduates with an air quality emphasis may work for 
environmental firms, regulatory agencies, and in applied research. Study of air quality and how air pollution is transported and 
dispersed is a rapidly expanding field in the atmospheric sciences. 

MEAS graduates play a key service role for the State of North Carolina, assisting in everything from analyzing the impact of 
atmospheric pollutants on agriculture and our estuaries, to determining the effects of toxic waste disposal on quality of surface and 
ground water. 

Honors Program 

Participants receive enhanced coverage of academic material and are involved in research. Eligibility is based on scholastic 
achievement. Minimum requirements are a GPA of 3.5 overall and 3.5 in the major, including required mathematics, chemistry and 
physics courses taken to date. Students are reviewed for eligibility after the first semester of the sophomore year and again as first 
semester juniors. Participation is optional. To successfully complete the honors program, a student will acquire a minimum of 9 credit 
hours of honors work, including 3 to 6 hours of independent study culminating in a written scientific report, and one of the following 
options; oral presentation in the department, a poster presentation at the Sigma XI Undergraduate Research Symposium, or 

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College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 



presentation at a professional meeting. The remaining honors credit is earned in honors' sections of undergraduate courses, and in 
advanced (graduate) courses. Students must graduate with a 3.4 grade point average overall. 

Undergraduate Research, Cooperative Education and Internships 

Honors Program participants, as many as 10 percent of ME AS undergraduates, obtain valuable experience assisting with research 
projects. Examples of past research projects include studies of coral reef fish in the Bahamas to understand age, growth, and life 
history transitions; assessment of Lake Victoria's impact on the climate of East Africa; examination of the relationship between 
atmospheric ozone and meteorological parameters as measured with instrumented balloons; experiments on generation of oxygen 
from moon rocks to supplement a manned moon station; and reconstruction of events during past volcanic eruptions on Hawaii. 
Outstanding MEAS students can receive career training with pay through the NC State Cooperative Education program, after 
completing the first year of undergraduate studies. Co-op and internship students have completed assignments with the National 
Weather Service, US Geological Survey, US Air Force, US Environmental Protection Agency, NC Museum of Natural Sciences, NC 
State Climate Office, NC Division of Marine Fisheries, NASA, local environmental consulting firms, and other state and federal 
agencies. Many students co-op or intern at the internationally renowned Research Triangle Park. After graduation, co-op students 
often are hired full-time by the same companies or agencies. 

Facilities 

The home base of MEAS is Jordan Hall, an award-winning structure that accommodates regular and tele-video classrooms, teaching 
laboratories, computing facilities, and offices of faculty and staff Jordan Hall has several facilities housing networked computers, 
some for unstructured student use, and some, like the Weather Analysis and Forecasting Laboratory, for teaching. This laboratory 
houses 25 workstations providing access to real-time and archived satellite, radar, surface, and upper-air observations plus a wide 
variety of numerical model fields. From the rooftop Weather Observatory, detailed weather measurements are automatically logged 
and archived and weather balloons are launched. Other new structures include the Research III building on NC State's Centennial 
Campus, which houses the Facility for Ocean and Atmospheric Modeling and Visualization (FOAM-V). supercomputing center 
supporting teaching, research and extension, especially in the MEAS focus on air-sea interaction. Research III also houses the State 
Climate Office, where many students gain skills in instrumentation, data acquisition, data analysis, and interaction with the public. 
For class work and field research in coastal settings, students may travel to NC State's Center for Marine Sciences and Technology on 
the shore of Bogue Sound, in Morehead City. 

Students who attend a research-intensive ("Research I") university benefit from the opportunity to engage in research as 
undergraduates and to study with professors whose involvement in research keeps their knowledge and enthusiasm fresh. The faculty 
of MEAS are internationally acknowledged research scientists, and the department maintains an extensive inventory of both 
laboratory and field research equipment and facilities. As a member of the Duke/UNC Oceanographic Consortium, MEAS has access 
to the R/V Cape Hatteras, a 135' coastal oceanographic research vessel, which serves as a platform for work on the physics, 
chemistry, geology, biology and meteorology of the sea offshore. Training cruises on the R/V Cape Hatteras occur each semester, 
providing practical experience in oceanography for marine science majors. 

Specialized equipment in the department supports teaching and research in: geological materials (electron microprobe. X-ray 
fluorescence spectrometer, an automated X-ray diffractometer, neutron activation analysis), geophysical measurements (GPS, 
gravimeter, magnetometer, seismic reflection), and sedimentology (microcomputer-controlled grain-size analysis). Stable- and radio- 
isotope laboratories support research in biogeochemical cycling, paleoclimatology and paleoecology. The Center for the Exploration 
of the Dinosaurian World provides research opportunities for students of Earth Systems History. Ecological studies are supported by 
a Motion Analysis System, a biotelemetry laboratory, and the departmental membership in the Cooperative Institute of Fisheries 
Oceanography, a joint venture of NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service and a number of universities within the state. 
Advancements in Air-Sea Interactions come through the Satellite Oceanography and Image Analysis Laboratory; the Physical 
Oceanographic Research Laboratory with its complement of equipment to monitor the ocean's motion and composition; the Planetary 
Boundary-Layer Laboratory with its instrumentation for monitoring physical processes at the land-air and sea-air interfaces; the 
FOAM-V facility, and the center for Marine Sciences and Technology at the coast in Morehead City, NC. 

Curricula 

The department offers several curricula in each of the areas of marine, earth and atmospheric sciences. Each prepares students for 
employment at graduation or for further professional training. There are three Bachelor of Science (B.S.) curricula in atmospheric 
sciences: Meteorology, Marine Meteorology, and Environmental Sciences - Air Quality. Most students in meteorology or in 
forecasting are employed with private organizations and public agencies. Air quality graduates are employed by consulting firms, 
private industry and public agencies. The marine sciences offer four B.S. curricula with concentrations in Chemistry, Geology, 
Meteorology, and Physics. Earth sciences house seven curricula: B.A. (Bachelor of Arts) and B.S. in Geology, B.S. in Geology with 
a concentration in Marine Science, B.A. and B.S. in Geology with a concentration in Earth Systems History, and B.S. in 
Environmental Sciences - Geology concentration. The B.A. and B.S. degree programs require similar core courses, but the B.A. 
contains more social sciences and humanities, and the B.S. more mathematics and other physical sciences. The marine sciences 
concentration adds marine sciences to the geology curriculum. Earth Systems History includes core geology courses, but with an 
increased emphasis on paleontology, paleobiology, and paleoecology. All environmental sciences degrees combine core knowledge 
in the science with economics, politics, and policy. Geologists are employed in both the private and public sector. The B.S. in natural 
resources, with a concentration in marine and coastal resources, combines marine sciences with economics, politics, policy, and 
management, to prepare scientists who can interface with policy-makers and regulators. 



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Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg records/curricula 

Curriculum in Marine Sciences. Chemistry Concentration/Bachelor of Science 

Curriculum in Marine Sciences, Geology Concentration/Bachelor of Science 

Curriculum in Marine Sciences, Meteorology Concentration/Bachelor of Science 

Curriculum in Marine Sciences, Physics Concentration/Bachelor of Science 

Curriculum in Geology, Bachelor of Arts 

Curriculum in Geology, Bachelor of Science 

Curriculum in Geology, Earth Systems History/Bachelor of Arts 

Curriculum in Geology, Earth Systems History/Bachelor of Science 

Curriculum in Geology, Marine Sciences Concentration 

Curriculum in Meteorology, Bachelor of Science 

Curriculum in Meteorology, Marine Science Concentration 

Curriculum in Natural Resources, Marine and Coastal Resources Concentration 

Curriculum in Environmental Sciences, Environmental Geology Concentration 

Curriculum in Environmental Sciences, Air Quality Concentration 

Minor in Geology 

The Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences offers a Minor in Geology to majors in any field except geology. This 
program provides a means of recognition for students in any field who have a curiosity about the materials, structures, and processes 
of the solid earth. Admission to the program requires a grade of C or better in MEA 101 and MEA 1 10. Successful completion of the 
program requires a C- or better in at least 15 hours of geology or geophysical course work which must include MEA 101, MEA 110 
and two additional laboratory courses. 

Program Administrator and Contact 

Dr. Skip Stoddard 

80x8208,(919)515-7939 

Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 

2140 Jordan Hall 

skip_stoddard@ncsu.edu 

Minor in Meteorology 

The Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences offers a Minor in Meteorology to majors in any field except 
meteorology. Admission to the program requires a grade of C or better in MA 141, 241, and 242, and in PY 205 and 208. Successflil 
completion of the program requires a grade of C- or better in the following courses: MEA 213, 214, 311, 312, 313, 314, and 421. 
MEA 130 may substitute for MEA 213. 

Program Administrator and Contact 

Dr. Al Riordan 

Box 8208,(919)515-7973 

Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 

5147 Jordan Hall 

al_riordan@ncsu.edu 

Marine Sciences Concentration in Chemistry 

(See B.S. Chemistry) 

Marine Sciences Concentration in Geology 

(See B.S. Geology) 

Marine Sciences Concentration in Meteorology 

(See B.S. Meteorology) 

Marine Sciences Concentration in Physics 

(See B.S. Physics) 



170 



171 



COLLEGE OF TEXTILES 




3408 Centennial Campus 

NCSU Box 8301 

Raleigh, NC 27695-8301 

phone: (919)515-1532 

fax:(919)515-8578 

e-mail: tx-adnut@tx.nc$u.edu 

www.tx.ncsu.edu 



A. Blanton Godfrey, Dean 

David R. Buchanan, Associate Dean. Extension and Applied Research 

William Oxenham, Associate Dean, Academic Programs; Director of Graduate Studies 

Thomas M. Ferguson. Assistant to the Dean. Infonnation Technology 

Melissa Griffith. Director of De\elopment. Assistant to the Dean 

Philip R. Dail. Director of Advising and Admissions 

Kentley B. Hester. Director of Student and Career Services 

Teresa M. Langley, Student Services Manager, Director of Textiles OtT-campus Programs 

Terry Brasier, Coordinator of Diversity Programs; Director of Student Services 

Honora F. Nerz. Librarian, Burlington Textiles Library 



College of Textiles 



The field of textiles is broad. It covers almost every aspect of our daily lives with applications in medicine, space, recreation and 
sports, personal safety, environmental improvement and control, transportation, household and apparel uses. These versatile 
materials, textiles, are made to design specifications by a variety of modem high-speed processes, utilizing tools such as lasers, 
electronics and computers. Textiles begins with the synthesis of fibers by man or by nature. Textiles are carried through many 
processes for fabric formation, including the steps necessary to make fabrics useful, such as the manufacture of dyestuffs and 
colorants, chemical auxiliaries and finishes, and cutting and fashioning into end-use products. 

The approximately 5,000 alumni of the College of Textiles hold diverse positions, many in North Carolina. In the textile and related 
industries, occupations range from manufacturing management, marketing and sales, and corporate management to designing and 
styling, research and development, technical service, quality control and personnel management. These textile graduates are in the 
creative and management decision-making aspects of the industry. They plan the flow of materials, processes and information. They 
create styles, designs, patterns, colors, textures, and structures for apparel, home and industrial uses. They engineer systems and 
products required of industrial space, medical apparel and other uses of textiles products. They deal with computers, automation, 
product quality, plant performance and environmental problems. They manage large and small companies, personnel, and systems. 

Opportunities remain excellent, with the college maintaining one of the university's best placement records. Demand for textile 
graduates from NC State University is particularly strong, due mainly to the strength of the academic programs. These programs are 
offered by two degree granting departments: Textile and Apparel, Technology and Management, and Textile Engineering, Chemistry, 
and Science. 

Degree Programs 

The College of Textiles offers a broad choice of curricula from which to choose. Bachelor of Science programs in Textile 
Technology, Textile and Apparel Management, Textile Engineering, and Textile Chemistry are available. These programs allow 
students to choose from a wide range of courses in addition to required core courses. The textile student's curriculum includes 
humanities, social sciences and basic sciences and may include concentrations in business, economics, industrial engineering, 
mathematics, physics, chemistry, computer science, or statistics. A variety of dual degree possibilities are open to textile students, 
usually requiring at least two semesters of additional study. Since professional textiles study is concentrated in the last two years of 
the student's program, it is possible for students from junior or community colleges, or other institutions of higher learning to transfer 
to the College of Textiles with a minimum loss of time. 

Upon completion of programs in either textile technology, textile and apparel management, textile chemistry, or textile engineering, 
the degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred. A Bachelor of Science in Textile Engineering is offered jointly by the College of 
Textiles and the College of Engineering. 

The College of Textiles offers the following graduate degrees: Master of Textiles, Master of Science in Textiles, Master of Science in 
Textile Chemistry, Master of Science in Textile Engineering, Doctor of Philosophy in Fiber and Polymer Science, and Doctor of 
Textile Technology and Management. For general requirements, consult the Graduate Catalog. By faculty agreement, candidates for 
the Doctor of Philosophy degree in other schools of this university may specialize in textile-related subjects. In such cases, research 
is usually done in textiles. 

Double/Dual Degree Programs 

Dual Degree Program in Textile Engineering and Chemical Engineering 

This dual degree program provides for meeting all requirements for bachelor's degrees in both Textile and Chemical Engineering in 
only 9 semesters. Students in this dual degree program select the Chemical Processing Concentration of Textile Engineering. 
Graduates of this program enjoy the benefits of two engineering degree programs that have long been successful in placing engineers 
into exciting and well paying careers. For more information on this dual degree program, contact Jon P. Rust (jon_rust@ncsu.edu). 

Eli Whitney Double Degree Program in Textile and Apparel Management and International Studies 

The joint program between the College of Textiles and the College of Humanifies and Social Sciences allows a student to earn a B.S. 
degree in Textile and Apparel Management and a B.A. degree in Multidisciplinary Studies with a concentration in International 
Studies. This dual degree is designed to prepare students for work in the increasingly global textile industry. 

The program includes all the technical course requirements associated with the Textile and Apparel Management degree. For the 
B.A. in Multidisciplinary Studies, students choose from among three areas of concentration: the Pacific Rim (language study in 
Japanese or Chinese), Latin America (language study in Spanish), or Europe (language study in German or Italian). The program, 
which takes five years to complete, includes possible overseas internships. 

Merit scholarship awards are available for high-achieving students who participate in the double degree program. For more 
information, contact Dr. Nancy Cassill, Room 3313, Textiles Complex. 



Anni Albers Scholars Program 

College of Design, Art and Design Program 
College of Textiles, Textile Technology Program 
North Carolina State University 



173 



College of Textiles 



The Anni Albers Scholars Program, a collaboration between the NC State University College ofTextiies and the College of Design, 
provides students simultaneously with exemplary preparation in design and in textile/apparel technology. Because NC State 
University has both renowned Colleges ofTextiies and Design, we are in a unique position to provide undergraduate education in 
textile design that is unparalleled at other institutions in the US. This program improves graduates' creative flexibility and enhances 
employment opportunities by combining professional skills in design with high quality technological knowledge. 

Students completing the Anni Albers Program will earn two undergraduate degrees: a Bachelor of Art and Design in the College of 
Design, and a Bachelor of Science in Textile Technology in the College ofTextiies. 

The program is named for a person who exemplifies the ideals and goals to which the program aspires: textile designer and artist 
Anni Albers. Anni Albers was educated in the Weaving Workshop at the Bauhaus and immigrated to the United States from World 
War II Germany. Anni. a noted textile designer, artist, and writer, brought her influential beliefs in the importance of textiles to Black 
Mountain School in North Carolina, and eventually to Yale University. Her work and writings have provided generations of 
American textile designers and fiber artists a philosophical framework and standard of excellence against which to measure progress 
and achievement in the medium. 

Facilities 

The College ofTextiies on the Centennial Campus is the center for textile education and research in the US. Within its walls are a 
critical mass of students, faculty, facilities, and programs that will "make a diflerence" for United States fiber, textile, and sewn 
products. 

Minors 

College ofTextiies majors are encouraged to minor in areas outside Textiles. Of particular interest are minors in Design, Business, 
Foreign Language, Paper Science, and Industrial Engineering. 

Cooperative Education Program 

This is a voluntary program which combines academic study with job experience. To be eligible for the program, a student must have 
completed two semesters at NC State (one semester for transfer students) and have a minimum GPA of 2.25. The program provides 
for alternating semesters of fiill-time study and fiill-time work. A minimum of three periods is required to complete the program. 

Honors and Scholars Program 

This program offers exceptional students the opportunity to explore areas of special interest through various forms of research or 
independent study. Students of high academic level, after their first or second year of study, are in\ ited to participate in this program. 
Special lectures, discussion groups and seminars in the freshman and sophomore years offer possibilities for future development in 
the honors program. Additional advising is available and recommended in order to create and define degree programs which meet 
students' needs. Honors sections and graduate level classes are open to these students. The College ofTextiies honor student will 
conduct a literature review and conduct an honors research project in an area of special interest. The honors project ranges from a 
scholars from a scholarly review of a special topic to a discussion of an experimental research problem. 

Honor Society 

Sigma Tau Sigma is the scholastic textile fraternity which was founded in the College ofTextiies in 1929 to honor students who have 
a grade point average of 3.250 or higher. The main goal of this fraternity is to create a high standard of scholarship among textile 
students. Twice every year the local chapter selects as its prospective member junior textile students who meet the above criteria. 
Sigma Tau Sigma also promotes excellence by awarding a trophy to the graduating senior with the highest overall grade point 
average in the college. 

Textile Scholars-in-Residence Program 

This program is sponsored by the College ofTextiies and the Division of Student Affairs. It is a four-year program with emphasis on 
a textile seminar series and educational and cultural enrichment activities. These co-curricular activities include seminars on special 
topics related to the textile curriculum and profession, tutorial sessions, field trips and musical and drama performances. Students are 
invited to join this program after their acceptance at NC State based on their predicted performance and must maintain a GPA of 3.0 
to continue. All students are housed together with upperclassmen living w ith freshmen whenever possible. 

Scholarships 

The Directors of the North Carolina Textile Foundation and friends of the College ofTextiies have established an outstanding 
fi-eshman scholarship program for incoming freshmen, transfer into the College ofTextiies and current Textile students. The College 
ofTextiies currently has the largest college-based scholarship program at NC State University. 

Centennial Scholarships are currently valued at 510,000 per year for in-state students with a full differential for out of state 
students. This scholarship program also offers a S7,500 enrichment fijnd per recipient for educational enhancement activities. 
Candidates must be nominated by his or her high school or home school by November 1st. or must self nominate before December 
1st. North Carolina Textile Foundation (NCTF) Scholarships (total value: $20,000) and Textile Foundation Prestige Scholarships 



174 



College of Textiles 



(total value: $10,000) are also awarded through the Centennial Scholarship Process. Application deadline for all Textile scholarships 
is December 1. Restrictions do apply. Contact Kent Hester at (919)515-6530 for flill details. 

Field Trips 

For certain textiles courses, it is desirable for the student to see the manufacturing process under actual operating conditions. When 
possible, student groups visit outstanding manufacturing plants. Trip participation is required. Transportation costs and other travel 
expenses, while held to a minimum, are paid by the student. 

Summer Employment 

Job opportunities for summer employment are available for textile students. Placement assistance is available through the college 
career services office and frequently can be arranged in the student's home community. Qualified students may arrange to receive 
academic credit through the Industrial Intern Program. 

Four-in-One Program 

The College of Textiles has a program which permits a student with a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university 
to complete the requirements for a Bachelor of Science degree in Textiles, Textile and Apparel Management or Textile Chemistry 
after the satisfactory completion of a minimum of one year of study. 

Applicants should have completed basic economics, mathematics, physics and chemistry requirements comparable with those 
required for the textile degree sought. Under these conditions, the student generally may complete the degree requirements in two 
Summer Sessions and two regular semesters. Students not meeting specific requirements in business, economics, sciences, or 
mathematics should remove deficiencies prior to entering a specific degree program, otherwise the program of study may require 
three or more semesters. 

Each applicant's undergraduate program is considered individually and, in most cases, a complete transfer of credits is possible. 

Associate of the Textile Institute (ATI) Diploma 

The Textile Institute, with headquarters in Manchester, England, is a prestigious international textile organization. This organization 
recognizes graduates from most of the College of Textiles programs who have achieved a GPA of 2.8 or higher. These graduates will 
be granted fijll exemption from the ATI examination. 

Exchange Program 

Selected students enrolled in textiles are given the option to spend at least one semester studying at a different university. The 
following list of opportunities are available. Brazil - Seni Citiqt; England - Leeds University, University of Hull, University of 
Manchester Institute of Science and Technology; Europe - AUTEX; France - University of Lille (ENSIT); Finland - Tempere 
University; Germany - University of Dresden, University of Munster; Guatemala - University of Valle; Hong Kong - Hong Kong 
Polytechnic University; Japan - Shinshu University; Mexico - ITESM. 

Additional information about these exchanges can be obtained from the Academic Programs Office. 

Special Services 

The College of Textiles offers several services and programs which enrich its academic programs. Textile and Apparel Research is 
conducted on a wide variety of problems relating to the fiber, textile and apparel industries. Frequently, the problems are 
interdisciplinary and involve team effort. Students have an opportunity to participate in the solution to current problems. The Office 
of Student Services is responsible for career services and scholarship programs of the College of Textiles. The career services office 
brings together industry recruiters and students for interview sessions for permanent and summer employment. Alumni may also take 
advantage of the placement office. The scholarship function is operated by a committee. It is possible for any United States Citizen or 
Permanent Resident student to pursue an education in textiles through scholarships, loans or grants, as long as he or she maintains the 
university's academic standards. 

Textile Off-Campus Program 

The College of Textiles offers a distance education program for undergraduate and graduate courses via the Internet, VHS tape, and 
CD. Courses are available to on-campus students but must be approved by the department. For information, please visit our web site 
at www.tx.ncsu.edu/academic/distance or call Deborah Savage at (919)515-6627. 




175 



College of Textiles 



DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILE AND APPAREL, TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT 

Centennial Campus, Room 3245 
phone: (919)515-6633 

T. J. Little, Head 

G. L. Hodge, Associate Head and Director of Graduate Programs 

A. M. Seyam, Associate Head and Coordinator of Undergraduate Programs 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: P. Banks-Lee; Professors: R.A. Bamhardt, S.K. Batra, N. Cassill, R.A. Donaldson, 
T.K. Ghosh, A.B, Godfrey, M. King, T.J. Little, W. Oxenham, B. Pourdeyhimi, A.M. Seyam, M.W. Suh; Adjunct Professors: R.W. 
Dent, W.A. Klopman, D. Sikema, T. Theyson; Professors Emeriti: A.H. El-Shiekh, W.C. Stuckey Jr, S.C. Winchester; Associate 
Professors: P Banks-Lee, H.H.A. Hergeth, G.L. Hodge, C.L. Istook, G.W. Smith; Associate Professors Emeriti: H. Davis, PB. 
Hudson. A. Hunter, W. King, T. Lassiter, M.L. Robinson; Adjunct Associate Professors: W. Barrie Eraser, C. Priestland, P.E. Sasser, 
D. Shiftier; Assistant Professors: M. Jones, T. May-Plumlee, K.A. Thoney; Assistant Professor Emeritus: F.W. Massey; Instructor: G. 
Lawrence, L. Parillo-Chapman. 

The Department of Textile and Apparel, Technology and Management offers Bachelor of Science degrees in Textile and Apparel 
Management and in Textile Technology. Each degree permits the student to specialize in concentrations. The curricula combine a 
foundation both in textile management and textile technology principles and applications. The B.S. Textile and Apparel Management 
degree has a Management concentration and an Apparel concentration, while the B.S. Textile Technology degree offers a Textile 
Design option. 

Curricula 

The B.S. in Textile and Apparel Management, together with its concentrations, provides opportunities for the student to get additional 
background in apparel manufacturing, production factors, law and labor relations, management science, finance and accounting. 

The B.S. in Textile Technology offers the student a background in the technology of manufacturing, design, development and 
evaluation of textile products. The textile technology program is both flexible and diverse, requiring students to acquire an 
understanding of all aspects of textile manufacturing processes and products. The program involves many academic disciplines and 
otTers a well-rounded versatile degree, which prepares students to a wide range of careers. Popular minors include Design, Foreign 
Language, Industrial Engineering, Business and Economics. 

The Textile and Apparel, Technology and Management Department administrates the Eli Whitney Scholarship program for students 
wishing to undertake a study of international business in conjunction with their studies in Textile and Apparel Management. This 
program permits the student to earn a B.A. degree as offered by the College of Humanities and Social Science and a B.S. degree in 
Textile and Apparel Management. The Textile and Apparel, Technology and Management Department jointly administrates with the 
Department of Art and Design the Anni Albers Scholars Program for students wishing to double major with a B.S. degree in Textile 
Technology and a B.A. degree in Art and Design. 

Students taking either the B.S. in Textile Technology or B.S. in Textile and Apparel Management may elect to add one of the medical 
textile tracks offered in the College of Textiles. Three tracks are available: Biomedical Textiles, Medical Textiles, and Healthcare 
Management. 

The Department of Textile and Apparel Technology and Management has state of the art laboratories including the Digital Design 
Laboratory, Nonwovens Pilot Laboratory, Filament and Technology Lab, Sara Lee Apparel Lab. Anni Albers Design Labs, Specialty 
Software Computer Lab. Microscopy and Image Analysis Lab. and Management Research Lab. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 
Curriculum in Textile Technology, Bachelor of Science 

Curriculum in Textile and Apparel Management, Apparel Management Concentration 
Curriculum in Textile and Apparel Management, Textile Management Concentration 

Minor in the Sciences of Nonwovens 

The minor in the Science of Nonwovens is available to all undergraduate students enrolled in the university as degree candidates, 
except Textile and Apparel, Technology and Management majors. The minor requires 15 credit hours. Nine hours of required courses 
provide a comprehensive overview of nonwoven products and processes including various manufacturing techniques, and product/ 
process/property interactions. Six elective hours may be chosen from areas including bonding technologies, nonwoven 
characterization methods and nonwoven product development. 

Journal 

The Department publishes an online electronic journal for students and professionals in the field. The Journal of the Department of 
Textile and Apparel, Technology and Management can be accessed at www.tx.ncsu.edu/jtatm 



176 



College of Textiles 



DEPARTMENT OF TEXTILE ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY AND SCIENCE 

Centennial Campus, Room 3250 
phone: (919)515-6558 

K. R. Beck, Head 

J. R Rust, Associate Head, Director of Undergraduate Programs 

H. S. Freeman, Associate Head, Director of Graduate Programs 

Burlington Industries Professor: R.L. Barker; Ciba-Geigy Professor: H.S. Freeman, Cone Mills Professor of Textile Engineering 
Chemistry and Science: C.B. Smith; Kosa Professor: A.E. Tonelli; Professors: K.R. Beck, D.R. Buchanan, T.G. Clapp, B.S. Gupta, H. 
Hamouda, S.M. Hudson, G.N. Mock, J. P. Rust; Adjunct Professors: A. P. Aneja, R. Goldman, G. O'Neal, D.J. Prezant; Professors 
Emeriti: J.R. Bogdan, D.M. Gates, J.A. Cuculo, A.H.M. El-Sheikh, PD. Emerson, R.D. Gilbert, RL. Grady, D.S. Hamby, S.P Hersh, 
CD. Livengood, PR. Lord, R. McGregor, M.H. Mohamed, H.A. Rutherford, M.H. Theil, C. Tomasino, PA. Tucker, W.K. Walsh, 
W.M. Whaley; Associate Professors: P.J. Hauser, W.J. Jasper, D. Hinks, M.G. McCord; Adjunct Associate Professors: W.P. Behnke, 
L.D. Claxton, R.G Keuhni, G Montero, T. Montgomery, l.D. Shin; Associate Professors Emeriti: T.H. Guion, A.C. Hayes, T.G. 
Rochow; Assistant Professors: R.E. Gorga, J. P. Hinestroza, J.A. Joines, R. Kotek, W.E. Krause; Adjunct Assistant Professors: H.A. 
Boyter, Jr., L. Dickinson; Associate Members of the Faculty: S.K. Batra, W. Oxenham, R.A. Donaldson, T.K. Ghosh. B. 
Pourdeyhimi, R.J. Spontak, M.W. Suh (Textile and Apparel Technology Management), R.E. Fomes (Physics), Professors Emeriti: 
R.A. Bamhardt, H.G. Olf; Associate Professors P. Banks-Lee (Textile and Apparel Technology and Management. 

The Department of Textile Engineering. Chemistry, and Science offers Bachelor of Science degrees in Textile Chemistry and Textile 
Engineering. Students receive a fundamental knowledge of the science and engineering involved in the production of polymers, 
fibers, yams and fabrics, and products based on them, and the process of dyeing and finishing. 

Curricula 

The B.S. in Textile Chemistry is a new, highly flexible, rigorous program that provides courses in fundamental chemistry, while 
incorporating the unique areas of applied chemistry known as textile chemistry. The applied courses are heavily oriented to the 
chemistry and technology of polymers, including polymer synthesis, extrusion and characterization. In addition, the color chemistry 
component of the degree includes the synthesis and application of dyes and other compounds associated with the coloration of 
materials, as well as the science of color perception and color measurement. 

The degree program offers two concentrations: American Chemical Society (ACS) Certified, and Science and Operations. The ACS 
Certified concentration is designed for students wishing to pursue advanced studies in chemistry and related subjects, for instance, 
medical school. Each concentration incorporates a large number of electives allowing students to develop focus areas in 
environmental chemistry, medical textiles, polymer chemistry, color chemistry, among others. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

The B.S. in Textile Engineering provides a broad base of fiindamental engineering courses as a foundation for studies in textile 
engineering. The textile engineering courses deal with the application of scientific and engineering principles to the design and 
control of all aspects of fiber, textile and apparel processes, products and machinery. These include natural and man-made materials, 
interaction of materials with machines, safety and health, energy conservation, and waste and pollution control. The B.S. in Textile 
Engineering is offered jointly with the College of Engineering. For more details about the program, see description under the College 
of Engineering. 

Specific curriculum requirements are available online: www.ncsu.edu/reg_records/curricula 

Curriculum in Textile Chemistry, Science and Operations Concentration 

Curriculum in Textile Chemistry, American Chemical Society Certification Concentration 

Minor in Textile Chemistry 

The Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science Department offers a minor in textile chemistry to majors in any field except Textile 
Chemistry. The program is designed to expose students to the technical and scholarly disciplines of polymer chemistry, fiber 
formation, color physics, dyeing, and chemical modification of fibers and fabrics, and gives them an opportunity to learn how basic 
disciplines are applied in an industrial environment. Any interested students should contact the associate department head of Textile 
Engineering, Chemistry, and Science for information about the minor and its prerequisites. 

B.S. Degree in Textile Engineering 

(See Textile Engineering curriculum in the College of Engineering) 




177 



COLLEGE OF 
VETERINARY MEDICINE 




4700 Hillsborough Street 

NCSU Box 8401 

Raleigh, NC 27606 

phone: (919)513-6262, Admissions; (919)513-6205, Recruitment; 

(919)513-6212, Academic Affairs; fax: (919)513-6197 



Oscar J. Fletcher. Dean 

David G. Bristol, Associate Dean and Director, Academic AtTairs 

Neil C. Olson, Associate Dean and Director, Graduate Studies and Research 

Michael G. Davidson, Associate Dean and Director, Veterinary Services 

Richard E. Fish, Director of Laboratory Animal Resources 

JefTIluckei, Director of Student Services 



College of Verterinary Medicine 



No specific undergraduate degree track is associated with a preprofessional veterinary medicine program. Faculty members from the 
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences serve as advisers to undergraduate students interested in Veterinary Medicine that are 
enrolled and pursuing a baccalaureate program usually in a science-related field. Preprofessional course requirements are listed 
below. After completion of the required courses, students may be eligible to apply for the professional veterinary program. Course 
requirements may be changed annually and are determined by the Committee on Admissions in the College of Veterinary Medicine. 

Undergraduate students with interest in veterinary medicine are expected to be pursuing a baccalaureate degree (to include the social 
science and humanities requirements in the appropriate curriculum). Minimum requirements and course stipulations for curriculum 
planning should be followed through by each of the students and their preprofessional advisers in order to be knowledgeable of the 
requirements. 

All courses listed below should be completed by the time of application to the veterinary college, except for two courses which may 
be pending completion in the Spring Semester, term, or quarter, of the year of application. 



Preprofessional Course Requirements 



BCH 451 Principles of Biochemistry 4 

BIO 125 General Biology or 4 

183 General Biology with Lab 4 

101 Chemistry I and CH 102 4 

201 General Chemistry and CH 202 4 

22 1 Organic Chemistry I with Lab 4 

223 Organic Chemistry II with Lab 4 

ENG 101 Academic Writing and Research 4 

GN 411 Principles of Genetics 4 



BIO 
CH 
CH 
CH 
CH 



MA 1 3 1 Calculus for Life Management or 
MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 
MA 141 Calculus I 
MB 35 1 General Microbiology 
MB 352 General Microbiology Lab 
FY 221 College Physics I and Lab 
PY 212 College Physics II and Lab 
ST 3 1 1 Introduction to Statistics 
Humanities and Social Science Electives 
Business and Finance Electives 



Professional Degree Programs and Career Opportunities 

Veterinary medicine is a science career dealing with the recognition, treatment, control and prevention of disease in animals. Career 
options are unlimited and varied as animal health affects the health and economic welfare of the nation. D.V.M. candidates may select 
several career options upon graduation. Federal government, private industry, private practice, and research and teaching activities in 
a university setting are all possible for licensed graduates. Successful completion of the professional training program should prepare 
students for appropriate North Carolina state licensing examinations. Persons interested in the professional courses offered may 
receive information by contacting the College of Veterinary Medicine, Student Services Office, Raleigh, NC or view the college web 
site at www.cvm.ncsu.edu. 




179 



College of Verterinary Medicine 



Required Courses 


Semester 




Hours 




Required 


Composition & Writing, 


6/7 


Public Speaking, 




Communications 




Calculus or Logic 


3 


Statistics 


3 


Physics with Labs 


8 


General Chemistry with 


8 


Labs 




Organic Chemistry with 


8 


Labs 




Biology with Lab 


4 


Genetics 


4 


Microbiology with Lab 


4 


Biochemistry' 


3 


Humanities and Social 


6 


Sciences 





Business and Finance 



NCSU - CVM FOR D.V.M. ADMISSIONS 

Pre-requisite or Required Courses for the 2005 Admissions Cycle 

NC State University Equivalent 



Any combination of the following: ENG 101 Academic Writing and 
Research (4), COM 110 Public Speaking (3), COM 1 12 Interpersonal 
Communications (3), COM 1 46 Business and Professional Communications 
(3), COM 21 1 Argumentation and Advocacy (3) 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus (3) or MA 131 Calculus for Life 
and Management Sciences (3) or MA 141 Calculus I (4) or 
LOG 201 Logic (3) 

ST 3 1 1 or ST(BUS) 350 Introduction to Statistics 

PHY 2 1 1 College Physics I (4) & PHY 212 College Physics II (4) or PY 205 
Physics for Engineers and Scientists I (4) and PY 208 Physics for Engineers 
and Scientists II (4) 

CH 101 Chemistry- A Molecular Science (3) w/lab CH 202 ( 1 ) and CH 202 
Chemistry-A Quantitative Science (3 ) w/lab CH 202 ( 1 ) 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I/Lab included (4) and CH 223 Organic 
Chemistry II/Lab included (4) 

BIO 125 General Biology (4) or BIO 183 Introductory Biology II (4) or ZO 
160 Intro to Cellular and Developmental Zoology (4) 

GN 41 1 Principles of Genetics (4) 

MB 351 General Microbiology (3) and MB 352 General Microbiology Lab 
(I) MB 411 Medical Microbiology (3) and MB 412 Medical Microbiology 
Lab(l) 

BCH 451 Principles of Biochemistry (4) 

Humanities courses include history, foreign language, arts, music, language. 
Social Science courses include psychology, sociology, and anthropology. 

Any business, finance, accounting, economics, or agricultural economics 
course. 



* Required courses must be completed with a "C-" or higher grade. All but two of the required courses must be completed by the end 
of the Fall Semester during which the student applies. The remaining two courses must be completed in the Spring Semester of the 
application cycle year 

DEPARTMENT OF MOLECULAR BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES 

C. McGahan, Interim Head 
phone: (919)513-6220 

Professors: K.B. Adler, C.F. Brownie, G. Cole. L.N. Fleisher, N.C. Olson. M.G. Papich, J. Piedrahita, PL. Sannes. B. Sherry, J.E. 
Smallwood. I.W. Smoak. D.E. Thrall; Professors Emeriti: A.L. Aron.son, R.A. Argcnzio. P.J. Bentley, T.M. Curtin, C.E. Stevens, C.S. 
Teng; Associate Professors: M. Breen, G. Dean, J.E. Gadsy. W.A. Home, L.C. Hudson, N.E. Love, R.E. Meyer, M.G. Papick, B.P. 
Peters, K.A. Spaulding, C.R. Swanson: Assistant Professors: M.J. Burkhard. J. Barnes. L. Martin, M. Rodriguez-Puebla. D.S. Reddy, 
Visiting Assistant Professor: J. P. Douglass; Research Professor: M.C. McGahan; Research Associate Professor: J. Horowitz; 
Research Assistant Professor; J. Gookin; Clinical Assistant Professor: J. Neel, C. Stanton; Instructor: J. Khosla. 



180 



College of Verterinary Medicine 



DEPARTMENT OF CLINICAL SCIENCES 

E. A. Stone, Professor and Head 
phone: (919)513-6230 

Professors: C.E. Atkins, E.B. Breitschwerdt, M.G. Davidson, K. Flammer, R.B. Ford, B.C. Gilger, E.M. Hardie, E.C. Hawkins, B.W. 
Keene, N.A. Monteiro-Riviere, E.J. Noga, T.J. Olivry, E.A. Stone, M.K. Stoskopf, L.P. Tate; Associate Professors: K.F. Bowman, 
B.A. Breuhaus, D.G. Bristol, L.A. Degemes, R.E. Fish, B.D. Hansen, G.A. Lewbart, D.J. Marcellin, K.G. Mathews, K.R. Muiiana, 
S.C. Roe, S.L. Vaden; Assistant Professors: A.T. Blikslager, T.C. DeFrancesco, S. Gardner, C.A. Hanns, M.L. Hauck, H.A. Jackson, 
S. Jones, B.D. Lascelles, T. Micheu-Miller, N.J. Olby, L.E. Williams; Clinical Professor: R.A. Mansmann (Director of Equine Health 
Studies Program); Clinical Associate Professor: W.R. Redding, Clinical Assistant Professors: S.A. Bissett, K.K. Ferris, M.P. Gerard, 
K.M. Murphy, S. Pizzirani, M.S. Rembert (Asst. Director of Laboratory Animal Resources), S. Sullivan, K.H. Taylor; Research 
Assistant Professor: PR. Hess 

DEPARTMENT OF POPULATION HEALTH AND PATHOBIOLOGY 

J. Floyd, Head 
phone: (919)513-6240 

Professors: G.W. Almond, K.L. Anderson, H. Barnes, T. Brown, P Carter, J. Cullen, O. Fletcher, J.G. Floyd, F. Fuller, C. Grindem, J. 
Guy, B. Hammerberg, M. Levy, D.H. Ley, D. Meuten, P. Omdorff, M.C. Roberts, M. Tompkins, W. Tompkins, D.P. Wages, Associate 
Professors: C. Altier, M.T. Correa, P. Cowen, P. Farin, J. Law, J. Levine, M.B. McCaw, B.D. Slenning, S. Tonkonogy, J. P. 
Vaillancourt, M.D. Whitacre, Assistant Professors: R.E. Baynes, D. Capucille, W.A. Gebreyes, K. Linder, A.M. Miles, C. Pinto, J.D. 
Roberts, G Smith, Clinical Assistant Professor: A.L. Cannedy, J. Flowers, Research Professor: E. Havell, Research Assistant 
Professor: R. Gehring, Research Associate Professor: S. Kennedy-Stoskopf, Adjunct Professor: V. Schijns, Adjunct Associate 
Professor: A. Bogan, E. Gonder, L. Kooistra, D. Marshall, D. Rives, A. Scheldt, W. Stames, Adjunct Assistant Professor: S. Clark, D. 
Malarkey, T. McGinn, R. Morales, M. Stebbins, Distinguished Professor: J.E. Riviere, Poultry Extension Specialist: D. Carver, Swine 
Extension Specialist: M. Morrow, Director, Electron Microscopy: Michael Dykstra. 




181 



North Carolina State University 



OTHER ACADEMIC AND ADMINISTRATIVE UNITS 

Academic Support Program for Student Athletes 



Reynolds Coliseum 
NC State Box 7104 
Raleigh, NC 27695-7104 

Philip Moses, Director 



vvww.ncsu.edu/aspsa/ 
phone: (919)515-2464 
fax:(919)515-1619 




The Academic Support Program for Student Athletes provides academic support for more 
than 500 undergraduate and graduate students who represent NC State in NCAA 
competition. All student athletes are provided with advising and counseling support in order 
to allow them to balance the rigors of academic course work with the rigors of competition at 
the NCAA Division 1 level. 

Biotechnology Program 

Robert M. Kelly, Director 

The Biotechnology Program at NC State includes some 170 faculty representing 24 departments in the Colleges of Agriculture and 
Life Sciences. Engineering. Natural Resources. Physical and Mathematical Sciences. Veterinary Medicine, and Humanities and 
Social Sciences. The Program administers minors in Biotechnology at the undergraduate. M.S.. and Ph.D. levels. Research in 
biotechnology is multidisciplinary encompassing three main areas: molecular biology, bio-processing/bio-analytical techniques, and 
in-vitro cell culture. One of the unique aspects of our graduate and undergraduate Biotechnology Minors is the focus on laboratory 
techniques. Many curricula offer a great deal of theory about molecular biotechnology, but few allow for the level of hands-on 
experience that our program does. For more information about the Biotechnology Minor, please visit www.ncsu.edu/biotechnoIogy. 

Computer Training Unit 

Betty Gardner. Assistant Director 
phone: (919)515-8163 

Since 1 989, the NC State Computer Training Unit has been a leading provider for the IT training needs of the Triangle. CTU operates 
out of McKimmon Center, utilizing four dedicated, state-of-the-art labs. New classes are introduced on a quarterly basis and 
tomorrow's technology is becoming a reality to hundreds of people today. 

Whether an individual is looking for a single class to become familiarized w ith an operating system or is committed to eight weeks of 
certification training, the Computer Training Unit can address this need. The certifications currently otTered include industry 
favorites from vendors such as Microsoft. Oracle. Cisco. CIW and Sun as well as newer programs like Biolnformatics and technician 
training through the Red Hat Academy curriculum. By keeping pace with today's technology trends, the Computer Training Unit has 
introduced programs specifically for K-12 educators with it's NC TEACH-IT program. Courses are offered to Raleigh's growing 
Hispanic community with instruction in Spanish. 

The NC State Computer Training Unit strives to meet the needs of each student. With a hands-on approach to technology, quality 
training and career guidance are provided to each participant. 

Visit the NC State Computer Training Unit web site today at www.ncsu.edu/ctu for a complete course schedule and certification 
information. 

Continuing and Professional Education 

Judson Hair, Director 
phone: (919)515-2261 

In keeping with the land-grant tradition of the university. Continuing and Professional Education offers noncredit education and 
training to all the people. CPE encompasses three sub-units: Office of Professional Development. The Computer Training Unit, and 
McKimmon Conference and Training Center, focusing on the development, facilitation, and deliver}' of continuing education and 
professional programs for business, industr>. and other organizations. Intensive learning experiences include practical case studies, 
problem solving exercises, and presentations from campus as well as noncampus. Up-to-date computer training is also available on a 
variety of different levels and on a wide range of topics. Special efforts are made to meet the training needs of industry and 
government agencies through general as well as customized ofTerings. The university awards Continuing Education Units to 
participants in qualified programs. Continuing Education Units are part of a nationwide system that provides a uniform measure of 
attainment in noncredit educational programs. 



182 



North Carolina State University 



Cooperative Education Program 

300 Cox Hall www.ncsu.edu/co-op_edy 

NC State Box 7110 phone: (919)515-2300 

Raleigh, NC 27695-7 110 fax: (9 1 9)5 1 5-7444 

A. S. Bell, Director 

This optional program is structured so that students will alternate semesters of study with semesters of practical work as sophomores 
and juniors. Academic work is spread over a three-year period to permit alternating academic semesters with work-experience 
semesters. Students earn a salary while they are in industry, and they may earn a sufficient income to finance much of their college 
education. The Co-op plan can be completed in five years, during which time the student receives 12 to 18 months of industrial 
experience. 

Students in all curricula may apply for the Co-op program if they have a grade point average of 2.25 or better. Application for 
admission into the Co-op program should be made early in the Spring Semester of the freshman year, however, later applications 
resulting in fewer work semesters will be considered during the sophomore year or the first semester of the junior year. Undesignated 
students must be admitted into a degree program prior to beginning the first Co-op assignment. Further information may be obtained 
from the Office of Cooperative Education, 300 Clark Hall. 

Credit Programs & Summer Sessions 

B. L. Puryear, Director 
phone: (919)515-2265 
www.ncsu.edu/acp/ 

Credit Programs & Summer Sessions (CP&SS) provides access to the university's courses and programs to individuals who are 
unable due to time, location, and other restraints to take advantage of full-time, on-campus study. 

Individuals in the Triangle area register through CP&SS as Lifelong Education (non-degree) students on a part-time basis into 
day and evening classes. CP&SS promotes this opportunity to area citizens and provides advisement, registration, and referral 
services to registrants. Approximately eight percent of the university's head count is made up of this population— many of whom 
eventually matriculate as regular, degree-seeking students. 

• CP&SS plays a key role in the overall administration of NC State's many and varied distance education courses and programs. 
Student services to registrants at-a-distance are coordinated through CP&SS. Over 2500 individuals register each semester in 
courses delivered across North Carolina and beyond, utilizing a variety of delivery mechanisms. 

• CP&SS administers NC State's Summer Sessions in which over 900 classes are taught to more than 1 3,000 students during two 
five-week sessions and a ten-week session. The Summer Sessions are designed to meet the needs of NC State's own degree- 
seeking students as they make progress toward completing their degrees. The Summer Sessions also attract a number of summer 
visitors from other colleges and universities who are drawn here by the breadth and depth of the course oflferings. 

The CP&SS has a staff of professional advisers who assist nontraditional students in their transition into university life. 
Academic advising, placement testing in mathematics, test proctoring, and career assessment services are provided. 

Division of Undergraduate Affairs 

140 Leazer Hall www.ncsu.edu/undergrad_affairs 

NC State Box 7105 phone: (919)515-3037 

Raleigh, NC 27695-7105 fax: (919)515-4416 

Jo Allen, Interim Vice Provost 

John Ambrose, Assistant Vice Provost 

Roger Callanan, Interim Senior Director 

Undergraduate Affairs Staff: J. Allen, J. Ambrose, T. Appling-Biel, F. Artis, A. Atkin, K. Baker, G. Barthalmus, A. Bell, L. Blanton, 
J. Bong, M. Bowden, K. Bowman, M. Bresciani, B. Bukhay, D. Burton, D. Callaghan, R. Callanan, P. Cellini, C. Chafin, C. 
Christopher, E. Clegg, M. Daniel, J. Dockery, A. Dupont, S. Foley, K. Franklin, D. Freeman-Patton, M. Gainey, L. Gonzalez, J. 
Gottlieb, K. Hauschild, J. Hawkins-Morton, A. Hunt, A. Irby, L. Jacovec, G. Johnson, S. Jones, B. Langston, C. Leger, S. Matney, R. 
McGraw, C. McLean, R. Mimms, P. Moses, J. Moylan, C. Newkirk-White, L. Nietfeld, K. Outing, A. Patrick, K. Powell, E. Reid, J. 
Robinson, V. Ruffin-Jenkins, C. Stonehouse, M. Taliaferro, M. Tetro. K. VanDreumel. Y. Walker, K. Wallace, G. Wical, M. Wicker, V. 
Williams, L. Wilson, B. Windom, D. Wood 

NC State University's Division of Undergraduate Affairs (UGA) promotes excellence and effectiveness in undergraduate education. 
UGA is charged with the development of a coherent vision for undergraduate education, the coordination of academic policy and 
curricular programming, and the strengthening of all academic support programs. UGA seeks to engage undergraduate students in a 
wide range of academic activities that enhance their learning and result in more profound intellectual and civic development. 

183 



North Carolina State University 




The First Year College 

43 Tucker Hall www.ncsu.edu/fyc/ 

NC State Box 7925 phone: (919)515-8130 

Raleigh, NC 27695-7925 fax; (919)515-8267 

John Ambrose, Director 

Janice Odom. Associate Director 

Andrea Atkin, Assistant Director for Curriculum and Teaching 

Jacqui Hawkins-Morton, Assistant Director for Advising and Training 

Mary Tetro, Assistant Director for Advising and Administration and Coordinator of Advising 

The First Year College at North Carolina State University provides a point of entry for students who 
are undecided about their choice of major, but interested in the institution's mix of science, 
technology, professional and liberal studies offerings. 

The program employs a student-centered approach to the development of an effective teaching and 
learning environment. As part of that eflbrt, the First Year College takes into account critical 
adjustments necessary for successful transition from the demands of high school to those of college. Based on a cognitive- 
developmental model that promotes the total university experience, the program brings into closer alignment the in-class and out-of- 
class experiences of students with the intellectual environment to achieve academic success through active involvement and 
responsibility for their own learning. 

At the core of the program are elements of access to quality academic advising, formal and informal interactions with University 
faculty, support from academically successful upper-class students, guided exploration of the university and its colleges, structured 
reality-based discussions of issues associated with transition from high school to college and deliberate reflection on the cultural and 
social offerings available at the university. These elements are addressed through an orientation course taught each semester of the 
freshman year, specially programmed residence halls, and the Faculty Fellows Program, through which faculty from across the 
university volunteer to work in various capacities with First Year College students and advisers. 

The Graduate School 

R. S. Sowell, Dean 
R. C. Rufty, Associate Dean 
D. K. Larick, Associate Dean 
D. M. Shafer, Assistant Dean 

The Graduate School provides instruction and facilities for advanced study and research in the fields of agriculture and life sciences, 
design, education, engineering, natural resources, humanities and social sciences, management, physical and mathematical sciences, 
textiles, and veterinary medicine. 

The school is currently composed of more than 2, 000 graduate faculty members within the ten colleges. Educated at major 
universities throughout the world and established both in advanced teaching and research, these scholars guide the university's 
graduate student body of some 5,800 men and women from all areas of the United States and many other countries. 

The faculty and students have available exceptional facilities including libraries, laboratories, modem equipment, and special 
research areas. For a list of graduate degrees otTered at NC State and details on programs and admissions, consult the Graduate 
Catalog. 

Information Technology Division 

S. F. Averitt, Vice Provost for Information Technology 

M. A. Vouk, Associate Vice Provost and Director High Performance and Grid Computing 

B. W. Padgett, Director, Computing Sersices 

S. W. Klein, Director, Technology Support Services and NC State University Help Desk 

A. C. Galloway, Director. Systems 

D. V. Norris, Director, Computer Operations and Facilities 

J. L. Van Horn, Director, Communications Technology - Network Operations 

NC State has a tradition of offering its students a leading-edge academic computing environment. Information technology is now an 
important part of most aspects of NC State student life. Many NC State administrative and academic units are in\olvcd in providing 
online services, information, and other resources for students. Academic computing resources are provided by individual colleges 
and central IT units. 

The Information Technology Division (ITD) designs and supports campus-wide academic computing systems and services that are 
available to all NC State students. These include the campus multi-gigabit network backbone, a growing wireless computing 
infrastructure, high-speed Internet access (ResNet) for students living in campus housing, the multi-platform (Window. Unix, 
Macintosh) distributed academic computing system called Unity, hundreds of software packages available for student use from 
computing labs, e-mail systems, the university's central web servers, file space, and friendly IT support staft" available to help 

184 



North Carolina State University 



students and others use the resources available. ITD also supports high performance and grid computing for researchers and students 
in computational science. 

All NC State students, faculty and staff automatically receive Unity computing accounts (or Eos accounts for engineering students). 
Unity/Eos accounts provide access to the campus-wide academic computing environment, e-mail services, an allocation of network 
file space with support for personal web pages, and access to Unity computing labs, software applications, and the Internet. Unity/ 
Eos accounts and file space can also be accessed via ResNet and off-campus Internet service providers. Instructions for logging into 
accounts and finding help with learning the system are provided during student orientation sessions, online, in Unity computer labs, 
and from the NC State University Help Desk. 

All NC State students may use Unity computer labs. They are equipped with Windows, Unix, and Macintosh workstations that 
provide direct access to the resources of the Unity computing environment. Colleges and academic departments support additional 
computing facilities, and overall there are more than 80 student-computing labs on campus, with over 2500 workstations with high- 
speed network connections available for student use. NC State does not require all students to own computers, although specific 
colleges or programs may make this requirement. Information about computer recommendations, specifications, and purchasing 
options are published online and updated each semester. 

For the most current information about NC State's computing resources, including online tutorials, student-owned computer 
recommendations, and acceptable use rules and regulations, see www.ncsu.edu/it/essentials/. Visit the NC State University Help 
Desk located in Room Hillsborough Building. Check the online Help database at: help.ncsu.edu/ or call 515-HELP (4357), or send 
e-mail to help@ncsu.edu. 

Institute for Emerging Issues 

N. Pickus, Director 
phone: (919)515-7741 

The Institute for Emerging Issues charts new directions in science, technology, and public policy. It brings together North Carolina, 
southern, and national leaders to generate innovative policies and spur multisectoral collaborations. The Institute's annual Emerging 
Issues Forum is a public service program designed to bring the highest levels of public policy debate to the people of North Carolina. 

Materials Research Center 

R. F. Davis, Director 

The Materials Research Center was established in 1984 at NC State as an interdisciplinary program involving persons representing 
the Departments of Chemistry, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Physics. The principal 
thrust area of the center involves fundamental studies in the epitaxy of compound semiconductors. The center serves as a focal point 
for this cooperative research. However, the experimental efforts are conducted within the four departments noted above. 

McKimmon Center for Extension and Continuing Education (MCE«&CE) 

www.mckimmon.ncsu.edu 

Denis S. Jackson, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Extension and Engagement 

Alice S. Warren, Associate to the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Extension and Engagement 

Bobby L. Puryear, Director of Credit Programs and Summer Sessions and Special Assistant for Academic Affairs 

As the "outreach arm" of the Provost's office, the McKimmon Center for Extension and Continuing Education (MCE&CE) enhances 
access to the academic resources of the campus by nontraditional students and other diverse audiences. Units within MCE&CE assist 
in the identification of educational needs and the development of relevant programming in collaboration with the faculty, 
departments, colleges and external constituents; facilitate the registration and advising of individuals with respect to both credit and 
noncredit offerings; management, program support services and a state-of-the-art conference facility; and deliver technical assistance 
and applied research. 

Specifically, the McKimmon Center for Extension and Continuing Education 

administers the Lifelong Education (LLE) student program for part time, non-degree enrollment in day and night courses offered 
on-or off-campus, 

• manages the university's Summer Sessions, 

partners with DELTA to provide student services for registrants in distance education courses and programs, 
affords volunteer opportunities for students in collaboration with the University Honors Program and Service Learning Program, 
develops and delivers noncredit continuing education programs to meet the professional development or training needs of 
business/industry, governmental agencies and nonprofit organizations, 

• offers customized programs for interested clients, 

• provides a wide array of software-specific and certification courses for individuals and organizations, with VA benefits for 
completion of selected Computer Training Unit offerings, 

185 



North Carolina State University 



operates the McKimmon Conference and Training Center which is a large, tlexible facility that hosts educational meetings for 

groups ranging in size from 5 to 1,200, 

provides opportunities for lifelong enrichment for people over the age of 50 through a robust learning-in-retirement program, 

conducts program evaluation and outcomes research, survey research, technology application and customized consulting 

services for federal/state/local governmental agencies and nonprofit organizations. 

performs a key role in the public schools statewide testing and accountability program, and 

ser\'es as the campus provider of Continuing Education Units (CEUs) that are earned through participation in approved noncredit 

courses. 

The McKimmon Conference and Training Center 

Valerie Jones, Assistant Director, Reservations and Client Relations Department 
Freddie Sinclair, Assistant Director, Physical Environment and Technical Services 
phone: (919)515-2277 

The McKimmon Center provides the meeting facilities, audiovisual equipment, and support services for adult education programs. 
Administrative services are available to organizations that desire assistance in planning and implementing conferences, short courses 
and other educational activities. Catering coordination provided by the staff is beneficial to the planning and successful 
implementation of banquets and related functions. The Center accommodates small meeting groups and large national and 
international conferences. There are 15 meeting rooms (which can be divided into 20 areas) that can be arranged for any type or size 
audience ranging from a typical conference room to an 1 lOO-person theatre style hall. Four rooms are dedicated as Computer 
Training Unit teaching labs. Downlink teleconferencing and other technical services are available in a new video production room to 
enhance the total learning experience. 

The NC State University Women's Center 

Frances D. Graham, Director 

The NC State Women's Center, located in 3 120 Talley Student Center, serves as a resource and referral center for campus and 
community programs and services for and about women and gender equity issues. The Women's Center is a unit of Student Affairs. 
The mission of the Center is to promote, support, and empower women on campus, to advocate for a university environment which 
eliminates barriers, diminishes prejudice and bigotry and extends a supportive climate to all women; increase awareness and 
understanding of multicultural women's concerns and gender equity issues, including an emphasis on how these issues affect both 
women and men; provide visibility for women, women's concerns, and women's contributions. 

The NC State Women's Center provides resources for women and men at a time when gender roles are changing within the NC State 
University community and society at large. Emphasis is placed on empowering women as leaders and agents of change on campus 
with particular concern for issues of sexual violence, race ethnicity, class, national origin, physical challenge, disability and sexual 
orientation. Specific programs, services, or student groups, such as the Wolfpack N.O.W., are designed to provide students with peer 
support, leadership experiences, and positive role modeling. Such experiences create support networks for female students (many of 
whom are pursuing careers in fields not traditionally open to women), promote personal growth and encourage a positive gender 
identity. 

Programs reflect a wide range of viewpoints about women's issues and gender equity. They are designed to increase understanding of 
gender issues, empower women to explore options in their lives and motivate both women and men toward greater involvement in 
these issues. The Women's Center offers an array of programs for students, faculty and staff throughout the school year. 

The office also provides confidential assistance, information and referrals for sexual harassment, sexual assault, and domestic/ 
relationship violence. The Director of the Women's Center serves as a Sexual Harassment Resolution Officer and as an Advocate 
trained to respond to rape survivors. 

The Molly Hays Glander Rape and Sexual Assault Response Line is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Advocates are 
trained volunteers who provide caring, confidential support as well as resources, referrals, and information for survivors of rape and 
sexual assault. Anyone who is dealing with a rape or sexual assault may call an Advocate for help and assistance. To reach an 
Advocate, call the Rape and Sexual Assault Response Line at 218-9102. 

For more information contact the Women's Center, 3 1 20 Talley Student Center at 5 1 5-20 1 2. 

The NCSU Libraries 

S. K. Nutter, Vice Provost and Director 

C. D. Argentati, Associate Vice Provost and Donald E. Moreland Deputy Director of 

Libraries 

K. A. Antelman, Associate Director for Information Technology 

K.. R. Brow n. Assistant Director for Planning and Research 

J. H. Kemp, Associate Director for Collection Management, Organization and Preservation 

W. L. Scott, Assistant Director for Organizational Learning and Design 




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The NCSU Libraries consists of the D. H. Hill Library and four branch libraries. The branch libraries - The Burlington Textiles 
Library in the College of Textiles, the Harrye B. Lyons Design Library in Brooks Hall, the Natural Resources Library in Jordan Hall, 
and the Veterinary Medical Library in the College of Veterinary Medicine- serve the special needs of their respective colleges. Also 
affiliated with the NCSU Libraries are the Learning Resources Library in Poe Hall and the African American Cultural Center 
Reading Room in the Witherspoon Student Center Annex. The D. H. Hill Library operates a 24-hour schedule during the Fall and 
Spring Semesters. 

The NCSU Libraries hold more than 3.1 million volumes of books, bound journals, and federal government publications, over 5 1 ,000 
print and electronic serials, and over 5.0 million microforms. Collections strengths are in the biological and physical sciences, 
engineering, agriculture, forestry, textiles, and architecture, with the arts, humanities, and social sciences also well represented. The 
NCSU Libraries has been a depository for U. S. government publications since 1924 and receives over 80 percent of these 
publications. The library is also a partial depository for N.C. government documents. 

NCSU Libraries" web site is www.lib.ncsu.edu. This extensive web site provides information about the Libraries' collections and 
services, as well as serving as a gateway to Internet resources and databases that support the university curriculum. Numerous 
bibliographic and full-text databases in all disciplines are also available through the Libraries" web site to users both on- and off- 
campus. An online catalog permits rapid identification of materials in the collections of the NCSU Libraries as well as those of Duke 
University, UNC-Chapel Hill, and N.C. Central. An automated circulation system gives users a quick and easy way to checkout 
materials. Through the web-based electronic-reserve service, students can obtain course readings and other materials that supplement 
classroom instruction. 

Digital library services include the availability, via e-mail or web, of reference assistance and interlibrary loan request forms. 
Resource sharing, made possible through Libraries' participation in the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN), includes a 
delivery service for NC State students and greatly enhances the research capabilities of the NCSU Libraries. A Digital Media 
Laboratory in the D. H. Hill Library offers equipment and assistance for creating and converting digital images and other materials. 
Students may also borrow PC and Macintosh laptop computers for in-building use. 

Facilities and equipment are available for both individual and group use of audiovisual media. The Libraries has a large collection of 
video, audio, and multimedia titles. The Libraries' Media Center is equipped with audio and video equipment in carrels designed for 
viewing and listening. 

New Student Orientation 

123 Leazer Hall www.ncsu.edu/orientation 

NC State Box 7525 phone: (919)515-1234 

Raleigh, NC 27695-7525 fax: (919)515-5844 

Roxanna McGraw, Interim Director 

New Student Orientation provides newly admitted first-year and transfer undergraduate students introductory assistance and 
continuing services that will aid in their transition to NC State. Our programs expose students to broad educational opportunities, 
academic expectations and resources, as well as social and developmental opportunities. Most importantly, we begin the process of 
integrating students into the life of the institution. As a component of the Division of Undergraduate Affairs, the Office of New 
Student Orientation is also committed to providing leadership to enhance programs that respond to student transition needs. 

North Carolina Japan Center 

F. A. Moyer, Director 

The North Carolina Japan Center, part of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, works to promote better understanding and 
deeper relations between North Carolina and Japan to the benefit of our state. Activities include a wide range of outreach services and 
educational programs, including the annual "North Carolina and Japan: Trade Investment" Conference each fall, and the monthly 
"First Thursday Club'" which presents a diverse range of programs on Japanese culture and society. The Center maintains a library of 
books, periodicals, and videotapes about Japan and a reference collection about study and employment opportunities in or relating to 
Japan. The Japan Center cooperates closely with the NC State Japanese language program (one of the largest in the Southeast) and 
provides study abroad scholarships for summer language study and fiill year exchange programs in Japan. For more information, 
please contact Francis A. Moyer at (9 1 9)5 1 5-3450. 

Office of Professional Development 

Chip Futrell, Assistant Director 
www.continuingeducation.ncsu.edu/ 
phone: (919)515-2261 

The Office of Professional Development (OPD) develops, promotes, and coordinates noncredit seminars, workshops, and 
conferences to a broad market on a wide range of topics. Program areas include accounting and taxation, communications, education, 
engineering, environmental, management, parks and recreation, substance abuse professional training, test preparation, textiles, and 
general interest. Special events management services are available to help both campus and noncampus individuals and groups to 
more efficiently and productively administer seminars, workshops and conferences. 

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Office of Research and Graduate Studies 

John Gilligan, Vice Chancellor 

Steve Lommel, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Development 
Matthew K. Ronning, Associate Vice Chancellor for Sponsored Programs 
Vacant, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Technology Transfer 

The Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Studies acts for the Chancellor and Provost in the general area of research 
administration for the university. The Dean of the Graduate School reports jointly to the Vice Chancellor for Research and to the 
Provost. 

The Vice Chancellor acts as the principal liaison representative between granting agencies and the university; assists faculty, 
department heads, and deans in identifying support for research programs, preparing and processing proposals, negotiating contracts, 
grants and cooperative agreements and developing intercollegiate and interinstitutional research programs and projects; manages the 
technology transfer activities of the university, administers the allocation of faculty research development funds; advises the Provost 
and Chancellor on the coordination of intercollegiate and interinstitutional research programs and facilities; and provides general 
information on all grant and contract activities. 

Sea Grant College Program 

R. Hodson, Director 

The North Carolina Sea Grant College Program is a state/federal partnership program 
involving all campuses of the UNC system. Headquartered at NC State. NC Seat Grant also 
has regional offices in three coastal communities. Sea Grant combines the university's 
expertise in research, extension and education to focus on practical solutions to coastal 
Klftrth PofAlino problems. Graduate and undergraduate research opportunities are available through Sea 

rIOnn warOliria Grant funded researchers and through two North Carolina fellowships and two national 

fellowship programs. 

Transition Program 

141 Leazer Hall www.ncsu.edu/undergrad_affairs/transprg.html 

NC State Box 7 1 05 phone: (9 1 9)5 1 5-7053 

Raleigh. NC 27695-7 105 fax: (9 1 9)5 1 5-44 1 6 

Ronald Minims. Director 

The Transition Program is a small, highly selective program for students who are academically eligible for admission to NC State but 
not into their first or second choices of colleges. The one-year program is designed to help students who demonstrate academic or 
transitional needs make appropriate decisions and accommodations for their academic success at NC State. 

Undergraduate Assessment 

126 Leazer Hall www.ncsu.edu/undergrad_aflFairs/assessment/assess.htm 

NC State Box 7 1 05 phone: (9 1 9)5 1 5-6433 

Raleigh. NC 27695-7105 fax: (919)515-4416 

Marilee Bresciani. Director 

Undergraduate Assessment in the Division of Undergraduate Affairs provides support for continuous program improvement for all 
departments serving undergraduate students by offering education and consulting regarding on-going assessment of student learning 
and development. 

Undergraduate Fellowship Advising 

207 Clark Hall www.ncsu.edu/oufa 

NC State Box 8610 phone: (919)513-4077 

Raleigh, NC 27695-8610 fax; (919)513-4392 

Denise Wood. Coordinator 

The Office of Undergraduate Fellowship Advising (OUFA) makes information about major national fellowships and other 
scholarship and grant opportunities available to students campus wide, helps students identify their potential for competition, works 
with students to enhance their writing, speaking, and interview ing skills, and provides support for the competition process. 



North Carolina State University 



University Honors Program 

Clark Hall, 2nd Floor www.honors.ncsu.edu 

NC State Box 8610 phone; (919)513-4078 

Raleigh, NC 27695-8610 fax:(919)513-4392 

Larry Blanton, Director 

The University Honors Program prepares excellent students for admission to and success within graduate and professional schools in 
the United States and abroad and positions students for national scholarships and fellowships. The program centers on NC State's 
mission and institutional strengths in discovery-, inquiry-, and creativity-based scholarship, i.e., research. The Honors Program will 
offer a series of HON Seminars and workshops, including a significant capstone research or creative experience that includes faculty 
guidance and focuses on the creation or expansion of new knowledge, particularly as a foundation for experiences that are conducive 
to post-baccalaureate education. 

Undergraduate Research 

146A Leazar Hall www.ncsu.edu/undergrad-research/ 

NC State Box 7105 phone; (919)513-4187 

Raleigh, NC 27695-7105 fax: (919)515-4416 

George T. Barthalmus, Director 

The Office of Undergraduate Research supports and promotes excellent undergraduate opportunities in discovery-, inquiry- and 
creativity-based scholarship through mentored research experiences with NC State faculty and other national and international 
scholars and professionals. Undergraduate Research is scholarly study in any discipline in which independent scholarship culminates 
in advancements in science, technology, engineering, business, the arts, or humanities. Undergraduates work under the mentorship of 
acknowledged scholars, experts and professionals. Any student chosen by a mentor may participate in undergraduate research. 
Students from any discipline can engage in the excitement of scholarly research. Motivated students from high schools, community 
colleges, and universities from North Carolina, the nation, and the world are invited to participate. 

Undergraduate Tutorial Center 

147 Leazar Hall www.ncsu.edu/tutorial_center 

NC State Box 7105 phone: (919)515-3163 

Raleigh, NC 27695-7 1 05 fax; (919)515-4416 

Melissa Daniel, Director 

The Undergraduate Tutorial Center provides academic assistance to undergraduates enrolled in many 100 and 200 level (and 300 
level Statistics) classes. Students are invited to use the various tutorial drop-in services or schedule one-on-one appointments as 
needed. Additionally, students may request to meet weekly with a one-on-one assigned tutor. Students are also encouraged to attend 
weekly Supplemental Instruction (SI) help sessions for selected large lecture classes. Finally, all undergraduate and graduate students 
are invited to utilize Writing and Speaking Tutorial Services (WSTS) for assistance with writing or speaking. 

Virtual Advising Center 

Lee Residence Hall www.ncsu.edu/advising_central 

NC State Box 7105 phone; (919)515-5594 

Raleigh, NC 27695-7 105 fax; (9 1 9)5 1 5-44 1 6 

Andrea Irby, Director 

Advising Central is NC State's virtual advising center, designed to provide e-mail and Internet-based advising to prospective and 
current undergraduate students. The goals of Advising Central are to make academic policies clear and meaningful for students, to 
help them navigate through NC State's human resources to find advice from the most knowledgeable person in a particular field, and 
to help students clarify their academic direction and strengthen their academic skills. 

Water Resources Research Institute 

K. H. Reckhow, Director 

The Water Resources Research Institute is a unit of the University of North Carolina System and is located on the campus of NC 
State. 

The institute was established to promote a multi-disciplinary attack on water problems, to develop and support research in response to 
the needs of North Carolina, to encourage strengthened educational programs in water resources, to coordinate research and 
educational programs dealing with water resources, and to provide a link between the state and federal water resources agencies and 
related interests in the university. Research and educational activities are conducted through established departments and schools of 



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the university system. All senior colleges and universities in North Carolina are eligible to participate in the institute's research 
program. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Price Music Center. Room 203 

Campus Bo.\ 73 1 1 

Raleigh. NC 27695-731 

phone: (919)515-2981 

fax:(919)515-4204 

e-mail: robert_pettersfc'ncsu.edu 

R. B. Fetters, Director of Music 

J. C. Kramer, Associate Director of Music 

Assistant Directors: J. A. Entzi, R. M. Foy, J. A. Fuller, R D. Garcia, M. S. Lynch. R. A. Meder, R H. Vogel, E. B. Ward 

The Music Department is committed to providing broad-based educational opportunities for NC State students through a variety of 
musical experiences and introductory and upper-level academic courses. Departmental faculty seek to assist students in developing 
musical insights, musical skills, and the capacity to perceive and respond to music in its historical and cultural contexts. 

Opportunities for direct student participation as performers include many choral and instrumental organizations. Membership in any 
ensemble is open to students with a disciplined interest in music. Auditions are scheduled during summer orientation, at the 
beginning of each semester, and by appointment with the conductor of the group. For further information, please call the Music 
Departmental 515-2981. 

The department offers a variety of courses, most of which may be taken to fulfill specific general education requirements. Any course 
may be taken as a free elective. An eighteen-hour music minor is offered for qualified undergraduate students who wish to engage in 
the serious study of music. Emphases include performance, piano, instrumental, vocal, history/literature, and theory/composition. 

The department also serves as a cultural resource for the university community and the public at large through concerts presented by 
student musical organizations, music faculty, and visiting artists. Concerts are open to students and the public. (Also see Arts NC 
State) 

Minor in Music 

The Department of Music offers an 18-hour minor in Music for qualified undergraduate students who wish to engage in the serious 
study of music within a curricular framework. This minor is designed to foster creative thought, aesthetic understanding, and artistic 
self-expression. Students may choose one of three emphases: Theory-Composition, History-Literature, Performance. Core courses 
include one music theory course and a two-semester sui^ey of music in Western Civilization. Applications are available in Price 
Music Center Room 203. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Carmichael Gymnasium, Room 2000 

March L. Krotee, Professor & Head 

Associate Professors: S.V. Almekinders, H.L. Brown, J.L. DeWitt, T.W. Evans, R.G. Gwyn, S.C. Halstead, V.M. Leath, I.F. Ormond, 
C.E. Patch. G.W. Pollard, T.C. Roberts, J.L. Shannon. R.R. Smith: Lecturers: J.R. Carroll. J.A. Kagendo-Charles. W.A. Cheek, K. 
Clark, T.S. Dash, RS. Domingue, K. Douglass. G.T. Holden, J. Home. T.D. Jones, R.H. Kidd, M.R. Lester, K.K. Lewis, C.S. Ousley, 
M.S. Rever, L.E. Scott, E.V. Smith, G.E. Wall, T.C. Winslow, G.R. Youtt; Part-time Lecturers: O. Ashe, R.N. Bechtolt, E.M. Fink, R. 
Harris, B.G. Kearse, L. Kerigan, H. Lenahan, D.D. Smith, M.A. Stevenson, E.C. Stoddard, S.M. Yates 

All Nonh Carolina State University students are required to complete two semesters of physical education to meet the university 
General Education Requirement (GER). Students must take a Physical Education 1 00-level course in Fitness and Wellness and one 
additional Physical Education course. 

Students may participate in an activity they are familiar with or choose to experience a new activity. Students with disabling 
conditions will be assisted by Physical Education, Student Health Service, and University Disability Services for Students in 
choosing appropriate classes. Only "activity" courses, not elective "theory" courses, may be used to satisfy the NC State GER 
physical education requirement. 

Minor in Fitness Leadership 

The Department of Physical Education offers a 1 7-hour minor in Fitness Leadership. It is designed to prepare students to assume 
fitness leadership responsibilities in both the public and private sector. The minor provides students with the fundamentals of 
anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, and nutrition. The development and assessment of fitness programs and protocols using various 
exercise modes and equipment/technology and the ability to apply these skills through a practicum is also part of the minor. For 
additional information, contact Nita Home at (919)515-6382. 

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North Carolina State University 



Minor in Outdoor Leadership 

The Department of Physical Education offers a 17-hour minor in Outdoor Leadership, which is designed for undergraduate students 
desiring to pursue careers as outdoor leaders of adventure-based programs or for those who wish to enhance their personal 
development and enjoyment. Students obtaining this minor will develop a foundation of essential leadership skills and experience 
through course work focusing on outdoor skills and leadership training as well as an opportunity to apply theory to practice through a 
practicum. For additional infomiation, contact Terry Dash at (919)515-1392. 

Minor in Coaching Education 

The Department of Physical Education offers a 19-hour Minor in Coaching Education designed to prepare students to assume 
coaching responsibilities with a sound theoretical and practical background. The minor provides students with a foundation of 
essential coaching skills and concepts as well as the basic principles of coaching philosophy, sport psychology, sport management, 
and prevention and care of sport related injury. The practical application of sport science, anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology, as 
well as strategies involved in coaching specific sports, are also addressed. For additional information, contact Dr. Charles Patch, 
(919)513-1547. 



MILITARY SCIENCES 

DEPARTMENT OF AEROSPACE STUDIES (AIR FORCE ROTC) 

Colonel Jeffery Webb, Professor of Aerospace Science 

Instructors: Major Jay N. DeLancey, Major Rodney L. Fauth, Jr., Captain Matthew T. Guise 

AFROTC Program 

There is a four-year and a two-year program that leads to a commission in the United States Air Force (USAF). The four-year 
program allows freshmen to enroll in Aerospace Studies courses in the same manner as other college courses for the first two years. 
Students take these courses as free electives and incur no military obligation unless they are receiving an AFROTC scholarship. 
These first two years are called the General Military Course (GMC). The last two years of AFROTC comprise the Professional 
Officer Course (POC). Non-AFROTC sophomore students may compete with GMC cadets for a position in the POC and obtain a 
commission under the two-year program. 

The two-year program is available to those who do not take the first two years of Air Force ROTC. Interested students must contact 
the Professor of Aerospace Studies early in the first semester of their sophomore year. Accepted students will attend a six-week 
summer field training encampment. 

Students at every level have numerous opportunities to further their knowledge of the Air Force, as well as their leadership. A variety 
of programs during the summer allow freshmen to visit bases or participate in programs such as the US Air Force Academy Free Fall 
program, soaring, combat survival, and numerous other activities. POC students have similar opportunities, focusing primarily, 
however, on programs related to the cadet's desired active duty career area, both in the U.S. and abroad. Throughout the school year, 
cadets have opportunities to examine all aspects of life in the Air Force and gain leadership experience through Air Force base visits, 
flying opportunities, and social activities. 

Upon graduation and satisfactory completion of the POC, the student is commissioned a second lieutenant in the USAF and is 
obligated to serve a minimum of four years on active duty. 

All students who complete the academic program of study with a minimum of 15 hours in military studies are eligible to receive a 
Military Studies minor This applies even to students who are not pursuing a military commission. Contact the Aerospace Studies 
department for more details. 

Financial Aid 

Air Force ROTC students are encouraged to apply for scholarships for two or three years. Scholarships pay for tuition, fees, books, 
and provide students a stipend each month during the academic year for miscellaneous expenses. Stipends vary according to the 
student's year of academic enrollment in AFROTC. For example, freshmen currently receive $250 per month, sophomores $300 per 
month, juniors $350 per month, and seniors $400 per month. Scholarships are awarded by the Air Force based primarily on college 
academic achievement. All scholarships have minimum academic standards that must be maintained. Students in the GMC. other 
than scholarship students, receive no monetary allowance. Additionally, special scholarships are awarded to fill critically needed 
academic majors within the Air Force. Currently, the Electrical Engineering and Meteorology students who meet minimum grade 
point average and physical standards qualify for these scholarships. 

Curriculum 

The AFROTC educational program provides professional preparation for future Air Force officers. Courses in the first two years 
(GMC) focus on Air Force missions and organization, other military services, and the history of airpower. The focus in the last two 
years (POC) is on leadership and management and in-depth examination of national security, American defense strategy, and the 

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methods Ibr managing conllict. A progressive development ofeommunieative skills, oral and written, is integrated into eaeh course. 
OfUcership is developed through leadership laboratory, traditional military social functions, base orientation trips, and cadet-centered 
programs. 

Eligibility 

All full-time freshman and sophomores may enroll in the GMC without obligation to the Air Force. To enter the POC, students must 
pass an Air Force OtTicer Qualifications Test, meet physical and academic requirements, and be selected by the Professor of 
Aerospace Studies and Air Force ROTC headquarters. In addition, some age restrictions apply; contact the department for more 
details. Students desiring to enter the four-year program simply register for the freshmen Aerospace Studies course. All students 
should contact the ROTC office on campus in room 1 33 Reynolds Coliseum, (919)5 1 5-241 7; or write to: Professor of Aerospace 
Studies. NC State. Bo,\ 7308. Raleigh. NC 27695-7308. 

Organization 

The AFROTC Corps, nicknamed "Wolfpack Warriors," is organized as a cadet wing staffed entirely by cadets for leadership 
development. They are assisted and advised by the instructors. Two collateral organizations. Arnold Air Society and drill and color 
guard teams, support the wing organization as well as the university. 

Uniforms 

Uniforms are provided by the federal government and are only worn on the day of Leadership Laboratory or as specified by the cadet 
corp leadership. 

View the NCSU Air Force ROTC web site at the following address: www.ncsu.edu/airforce_rotc/intro.html 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE (ARMY ROTC) 

Commander Michael Wawrzyniak, Professor of Military (PMS) 

Instructors: Major Tracy Davidson. Captain Sean Truax. Master Sergeant Marc Tuttle. Sergeant First Class Lee Holliday 
Mission 

The mission of the Army ROTC Program is to train college men and women to become commissioned officers in sufficient numbers 
to meet Active Army. Army Reserve and National Guard requirements. 

Program of Instruction 

The Amiy ROTC program consists of a voluntary Basic Course (freshmen and sophomore level) and a two-year Advanced Course 
(junior and senior level) that includes a six-week camp in the summer prior to the senior year. One may enter the Advanced Course 
without participating in the Basic Course by any of the following methods: 

Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP): Members of Reserve or National Guard units may take advantage of this program 
and. if accepted, enroll directly into the Advanced Course. SMP participants will be assigned to a unit near NC State or home for part- 
time monthly officer training and will receive the ROTC Advanced Course subsistence payment of $350 per month for Juniors and 
$400 for Seniors, plus approximately $1 50 per month for the one weekend of Reserve or Guard training. In addition, two weeks of 
Annual Training will be required for which the individual will receive full pay. 

Prior Service: Service veterans are eligible for placement into the Advanced Course. 

Leader's Training Course (LTC): Successful completion of the four-week basic summer camp, held at Ft. Knox, Kentucky is an 
alternative to the Basic Course. 

Transfer Credit: Students entering as transfer students from other institutions may receive credit for work completed at other Senior 
ROTC units. 

Junior ROTC: Students who have participated in a .lunior ROTC in high school may receive placement credit as determined by the 
Professor of Military Science. 

Eligibility 

All full-time freshmen and sophomores may enroll in any Military Science Basic Course offering without obligation to the Army. To 
be eligible for participation in the Advanced Course, applicants must be in good academic standing and demonstrate satisfactory 
performance in the Basic Course. Additionally, applicants for commissioning must be able to be commissioned by their 30th 
birthday. An age waiver may be obtained as long as the indi\ idual will be commissioned prior to his/her 32nd birthday. A student 
must have a minimum of two years remaining as a full-time student at either the undergraduate or graduate level. 



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North Carolina State University 



Professional Military Education 

There are five Professional Military Education (PME) courses which must be taken or have an approval of a waiver obtained for 
them. All but one content area (Military History) are automatically met by completion of the university's General Education 
Distribution Requirements. PME requirements must be completed or waived prior to commissioning. 

Delays for Graduate Study 

Qualified ROTC graduates may delay their entry into active service in order to obtain advanced academic degrees. Fellowships for 
advanced academic study are available to selected ROTC graduates, allowing up to two years of graduate study while receiving full 
pay and allowances plus payment for tuition, all fees, textbooks, and required supplies. 

Financial Aid 

Army scholarships of two to four years which pay for tuition, all fees and textbooks are available on a competitive basis to students 
who are strongly motivated and academically qualified. Students in the Advanced Course who are preparing for commissioning 
receive a subsistence allowance of $350 per month for Juniors and $400 per month (tax free) up to a maximum of $4000. All 
Advanced Course cadets are paid approximately one-half the basic pay of a second lieutenant while attending the six-week Advanced 
Camp, plus travel allowances to and from camp. 

Service Opportunities 

Scholarship recipients may serve four years active duty upon commissioning or eight years in the United States Army Reserve or 
National Guard. Service consists of one weekend drill per month and two weeks annual training. 

Program Features 

Army ROTC classes are unique, offering instruction and a practical, working knowledge of leadership. Students are challenged early 
in the ROTC training to enable them to develop sound judgment, the desire to achieve, acceptance of responsibility, personal 
confidence, and to learn the principles of personnel management. The primary vehicle for this training during the academic year is 
Leadership Laboratory, where cadet officers and non-commissioned officers conduct instruction under the supervision of the Military 
Science Department's faculty. The intensive summer Advanced Camp is extremely effective in developing one emotionally, mentally 
and physically. All Army ROTC training is focused on preparing the student to meet the challenges of tomorrow's society, whether in 
a military or civilian career. 

Distinguished Military Students 

The university names outstanding Army ROTC students as Distinguished Military Graduates. 

Uniforms 

Uniforms for ROTC are provided by the federal government. 

Departmental Offices 

Our Administrative Office is located in Room 145 Reynolds Coliseum. 

NAVAL SCIENCE (NAVAL ROTC) 

Captain Calton Puryear, Professor of Naval Science 

Associate Professors: Lt. Col. Russell Paulsen, Capt. Edward Sager; Instructors: Lt. Keith Reed, Lt. Clinton J. Warren, Lt. Jason 
Geddes, Lt. Mark F. Monturo 

Mission 

The purpose of the Naval Reserve Officers Training Cops is to develop midshipmen mentally, morally, and physically and to imbue 
them with the highest ideals of duty, honor, and loyalty in order to commission college graduates as naval officers who possess a 
basic professional background, are motivated toward careers in the naval service, and have a potential for future development in mind 
and character so as to assume the highest responsibilities of command, citizenship, and government. 

4-year NROTC Program 

There are basically two NROTC programs leading to a commission as a Navy or Marine Officer upon graduation: the Scholarship 
Program and the College Program. 

Scholarship Program: The Scholarship Program leads to a commission in the Navy or Marine Corps. For students who receive a 
Navy /Marine Corps scholarship, the Navy will pay tuition and fees, supply uniforms, and pay $1 50 per month tax-free subsistence 
allowance and provide a $250 book allowance each semester to help defray the cost of normal board at the university. During the 
summers between school years scholarship students will receive 4-6 weeks of at-sea training conducted on ships, submarines, and 

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North Carolina State University 



aircraft ofllic Navy's first line force. Upon graduation and commissioning, scholarship students are obligated to serve a minimum of 
four years on active duty. 

College Program: For those students who are interested in a commission and do not desire a scholarship, or for those who are 
seeking an opportunity to qualify for a scholarship after entering NC State, the College Program is available. Selection for the 
College Program is made from students already enrolled at NC State, with applications being accepted and considered by the staff of 
the NROTC unit. Students enrolled in the College Program are provided uniforms and Naval Science textbooks. College Program 
students compete for selection to continue NROTC in Advanced Standing at the end of their sophomore year. Selection is based on 
academic and demonstrated professional performance. Those selected for Advanced Standing receive $ 1 50 per month subsistence 
allowance during the final two years of the program. College Program midshipmen receive a single summer training cruise between 
the junior and senior year. Except for administrative differences, no distinction is made between the Scholarship and College 
Program midshipmen. The minimum active duty commitment following graduation for a College Program Student is three years. 

Students in the College Program are eligible to compete for scholarships at regular intervals. Most College Program students who 
have demonstrated average academic and professional performance in the unit have received scholarships. 

Two- Year Programs 

The Two- Year Programs offer an opportunity to participate in NROTC in the final two years of University study. Both Scholarship 
and College Programs exist, offering the same advantages to the student having two years of college remaining as the respective four- 
year programs. 

Applications for this program must be completed by March 15 prior to the starting year. Upon selection, the candidate attends a six- 
week training course at Newport, Rhode Island, during the summer between the sophomore and junior years so that he or she may 
receive instruction in the Naval Science subjects normally covered in the first two years at the university. Participants in this training 
course receive uniforms, room and board, and officer candidate pay during the period and, upon satisfactory completion of training, 
enter the NROTC program as third year students. The application process can be time consuming. In order to meet the March 15 
deadline, students are encouraged to contact the Department of Naval Science before December 1 of their sophomore year. 

Tlie Marine Option 

A limited number of quotas are available for students who wish to enter either of NROTC Programs as Marine Officer candidates. 
For others who may decide up on a Marine Corps commission after joining NROTC program as third year, selection for the Marine 
Option may be made in the sophomore year. A midshipman's status as a Marine Option will result in some modifications to the 
curriculum and the final summer training period. 

Curriculum 

Due to the increasingly advanced technologies being employed by the Navy and Marine Corps, candidates for Navy Commissions 
are encouraged to select academic majors in mathematics, engineering, or scientific disciplines. However, each student in the 
NROTC program is free to choose his or her area of major study. 

The NROTC training program emphasizes academics, leadership, military organization, and physical fitness. Required Naval 
Science courses are fully accredited, taken for free elective credit and include Naval Orientation. Engineering, Weapons Systems, 
Navigation, Naval Operations, and Leadership and Management. Marine Option midshipmen substitutes Evolution of Warfare and 
Amphibious Warfare for selected courses. Additional University courses may be required depending upon one's major, however, all 
Navy option scholarship midshipmen must complete one year of calculus and physics. In addition to the courses taken for University 
credit, midshipmen will attend one leadership laboratory period each week. 

Midshipmen Life 

Academic excellence is emphasized through the NROTC Program with commensurate participation in the full range of campus extra 
curricular activities. The NROTC unit is organized as a midshipmen battalion to facilitate leadership development. The battalion is 
stafTed entirely by midshipmen under the supervision of staff instructors. Additionally, midshipmen have opportunities to examine all 
aspects of life in the Navy and Marine Corps and gain leadership experience through field trips, summer cruise, sail training, and 
social activities. Further information regarding application for and admission into the NC State Naval ROTC may be obtained on 
campus in Room 1 86 Reynolds Coliseum or by w riting to the Professor of Naval Science, Box 73 1 0, NC State, Raleigh. North 
Carolina27695-73IOorby calling Mr. Jimmy Ledbetter at (919)515-2757. 

The Department of Military Science (Army ROTC), the Department of Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC). and the Department of 
Na\al Science (Naval ROTC) are separate academic and administrative subdivisions of the institution. Students in the ROTC 
programs will receive free elective credit for Aerospace Studies (AS). Military Studies (MS), or Naval Science (NS) courses up to the 
limit of free electives in their curriculum. 



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RESEARCH CENTERS AND FACILITIES 

Research Triangle 

NC State is one of the three Research Triangle universities along with Duke University in Durham and the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill, within the 30 mile triangle formed by the three universities is the 7,000 acre Research Triangle Park, location 
of many public research agencies and private research centers of national and international corporations. 

The unique "Research Triangle" in North Carolina has captured national and international attention. It is comprised of the Research 
Triangle Park, a world-renowned research park, and three major research universities. Because of this wealth of educational and 
research opportunities, the Triangle contains one of the highest total of Ph.D. scientists and engineers per capita, in the nation. The 
Triangle Universities— North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Duke University— have 
a subsidiary campus in the Research Triangle Park- RTl International. RTl, which operates as a contract research organization, has an 
annual research review of approximately $206 million. 

The Research Triangle Park, founded in 1959, now has more than 140 private and public industrial research facilities, situated on 
7,000 acres of land. Over 35,000 people work in the Park and over 40,000 additional jobs have been created outside the Park as a 
result of its existence. Organizations in the park include such government facilities as the National Humanities Center, the National 
Institute of Environmental Health Science, and the Environmental Protection Agency. Private companies such as GlaxoSmithKline, 
Nortel Networks, and Cisco Systems are located in the Park. Faculty and companies like GlaxoSmithKline, IBM, and BD 
Technologies frequently hold adjunct appointments in one or another of the Triangle Universities. 

Animal and Poultry Waste Management Center 

C. M. Williams, Director 

The Animal and Poultry Waste Management Center establishes partnerships among universities, agribusiness and other organizations 
to address waste management concerns. Partner universities are Georgia, Iowa State, Kentucky, Michigan State, Mississippi State, 
Ohio State, Oklahoma State, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute; commodity groups are also members. Environmental groups and 
regulatory agencies serve the Center in an advisory role. Center-sponsored projects include technology applications targeting 
environmental emissions from livestock operations and the improvement of water quality associated with animal waste management. 
Other Center work includes providing facilities and equipment for carrying out research and teaching activities focusing on 
converting animal by-products into economically feasible and socially acceptable value-added products. 

Center for Advanced Computing and Communication 

Dennis Kekas, Director 

The Center for Advanced Computing and Communication (CACC) is a National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored Industry/ 
University Cooperative Research Center with research sites at NC State University and Duke University. An advisory board 
comprised of representatives of member companies and government agencies meets twice a year to direct the Center's research 
activities. Faculty and graduate students also work closely with each member's technical staff on a variety of research projects. 
Current members include CipherOptics, Cisco Systems, Ericsson, IBM, ISlC Corporation, Nortel Networks, Naval Surface Warfare 
Center, National Security Agency and Telcordia technologies. 

The Center's mission is to carry out basic and applied research on problems having both industrial and academic relevance, to 
transfer these results to our members, and to provide our students with a challenging educational opportunity. Our research goal is to 
create concepts, methods, and tools for use in the analysis, design, and implementation of advanced computer and communication 
systems. CACC is uniquely equipped to serve as a test bed for new networking hardware, software, and protocols because of its state- 
of-the-art Networking, Multimedia and Imaging Laboratories. 

Center for Advanced Electronic Materials Processing (AEMP) 

C. M. Osbum, Director 

The Center for Advanced Electronic Materials Processing was established in 1988 as a National Science Foundation Engineering 
Research Center. It now includes the SRC/SEMATECH Research Center program on Front End Processes for advanced semi- 
conductor devices. The Center's program is interdisciplinary involving collaboration among chemists, physicists, materials scientists 
and electrical, chemical and mechanical engineers. The research focuses on the development of processing technologies capable of 
producing nandometer scale electronic devices. The program emphasizes rapid-thermal and low temperature processing of new 
materials. It is a joint effort involving researchers from eight other major US research universities. Undergraduate Scholar Awards are 
available for qualified undergraduates with interest in electronic materials and devices. 

Center for Advanced Processing and Packaging Studies 

K. R. Swartzel, Site Director 

The Center for Advanced Processing and Packaging Studies was established in October 1987 to promote cooperative research 
between university and industrial researchers and to further scientific knowledge in areas of food and pharmaceutical aseptic 
processing and packaging. The mission and focus of the center is to conduct industrially relevant research directed at developing 

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methods and technologies tor the sate production of marketable, high quality aseptic and refrigerated extended shelf-life products. 
The center is funded by industrial members from the food, processing and packaging industries and receives support from the 
National Science Foundation and the universities involved. Students working on CAPPS projects will be exposed to industrial 
concerns and be given the opportunity to work first-hand with industry in solving problems and making practical application of their 
research. Cooperative research opportunities are available in the Department of Food Science at NC State and also at other 
universities. 

Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes 

Robin P. Gardner, Director 

The Center for Engineering Applications of Radioisotopes was established in 1980 within the Department of Nuclear Engineering 
and associated with the Department of Chemical Engineering. It is composed primarily of faculty and their graduate students and 
post-doctoral students doing research related to the measurement applications of radiation and radioisotopes in industry. This 
includes the use of short-lived radioactive tracers, radiation gauges, radiation analyzers, and computed tomography. CEAR has 
devoted much etTort to the development and use of Monte Carlo simulation tor the design and inverse analysis use of these 
applications. Excellent experimental facilities are available including solid state and very large Nal detectors and the NC State 
PULSTAR Nuclear Reactor. The Center's programs are financed largely by an Associates Program for oil well logging and grants 
from industry and federal agencies such as NIH and DOE. 

Center for Research and Development in Mathematics and Science Education 

S. B. Berenson, Director 

Glenda S. Carter, Associate Director 

The center, one often centers in the North Carolina Mathematics and Science Education Network, is the only research and 
development center in the network. Established in 1984, the center is in the Department of Mathematics, Science, and Technology 
Education, and conducts research and development activities for precollege students, pre-service teachers, in-service teachers, and 
University faculty. The center identifies areas in need of mathematics and science education and forms partnerships with federal, 
state, local, and private funding agencies to work collaboratively to address the needs. Grants have been obtained from the National 
Science Foundation, Ofilce of Education, State Department of Public Instruction, Local Education Agencies, the Ford Foundation, 
and IBM to introduce changes that incorporate technology and active learning into the mathematics and science curriculum, K-16. In 
addition, the center supports graduate students and provides them with opportunities to write grants and to design, conduct, and 
report on educational research. 

Center for Research in Scientific Computation 

H. T. Banks, Director 

The Center for Research in Scientific Computation (CRSC) is a formally recognized, multidisciplinary center of the greater 
University of North Carolina System. The CRSC is administered by NC State and the College of Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences. The purpose of the Center is to promote research in scientific computing and to provide a focal point for research in 
computational science, and applied mathematics. Data-massive and/or computationally intensive problems provide ideal projects for 
training and graduate students in applied mathematics. With advanced computing methodologies students and post doctoral fellows 
address important issues in applications involving model development and control design. 

Research topics of interest to CRSC faculty include a variety of problems in scientific computation, numerical analysis, and 
numerical optimization with applications to such areas as fiuid mechanics and flow control, smart materials and structures, 
nondestructive testing, acoustics, material sciences and manufacturing processes, population dynamics, environmental sciences, 
signal processing, computer performance evaluation and nuclear reactor physics. 

The CRSC, in cooperation with the Department of Mathematics, sponsors a university/industrial research project program. The main 
goal of the Industrial Applied Math Program (I AMP) is to provide substantive non-academic research related experiences for 
graduate students, postdoctoral and faculty participants while contributing to the research etTorts of industrial participants. 

Center for Transportation and the Environment 

J. S. Fisher, Director 

The Center for Transportation and the Environment conducts programs of research, education, and technology transfer that seek to 
mitigate the impacts of surface transportation on the environment. Funded by the U. S. Department of Transportation, with matching 
monies from North Carolina DOT, CTE is the only university transportation in the countr> that pursues ways to improve surface 
transportation systems while protecting the environment. CTE is considered a national resource for current information about 
transportation and environmental research, policies, and best practices. The Center conducts an innovative and aggressive outreach 
program, using satellite- and computer-based technologies, to assist transportation and environmental professionals with their most 
critical information needs. For more information, visit CTE's web site at; itre.ncsu.edu'cte. 

Chemical Toxicology Research and Pharmacokinetics 

J. E. Riviere, Director 

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The Center for Chemical Toxicology Research and Pharmacokinetics performs scientific research on cutaneous function and 
structure focused on cutaneous toxicology, metabolism and pharmacokinetics and transdennal drug delivery, employing innovative 
animal and mathematical models and other predictive systems including cell cultures and novel analytical techniques. This provides 
the necessary research base to support a rigorous graduate and post-graduate training program in comparative pharmacology and 
toxicology designed to produce health scientists for academia, industry and government. Besides laboratory research, CCTRP also 
operates the US and global Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank (FARAD), performs the residue avoidance data analysis, and 
provides assistance to those who have questions about how to prevent residues in animal-derived food. 

The CVM Laboratory for Advanced Electron and Light Optical Methods 

M. .1. Dykstra, Director, LAELOM 

The LAELOM is a full-service facility providing clinical and research support for the CVM as well as the full NC State campus. The 
LAELOM houses a FEICO/Philips EM208S transmission electron microscope and a JEOL JSM-6360LV low vacuum scanning 
electron microscope with all the necessary support equipment for tissue preparation as well as extensive darkroom facilities for the 
production of electron microscopy images. The LAELOM also houses an extensive collection of light microscopy instruments, 
including an Olympus Vanox motorized compound light microscope that can capture images with film, a 3 CCD video cameral (live 
images) or a high-end SPOT RT Slider cooled CD camera. Bright field, polarized, and epifiouresence images can be recorded with 
this microscope. A Wild photomicroscope is also available for viewing and recording images from larger specimens with bright and 
dark-field optics. A Nikon C-1 confocal scanning laser microscope system with a heated stage coupled to a Nikon Eclipse 2000E 
motorized inverted photomicroscope is equipped for bright field, polarized, and epiflourescence image capture with a digital camera. 

Electric Power Research Center 

P. J. Turinsky, Executive Director 

The Electric Power Research Center, established in 1985 within the NC State College of Engineering, is supported via membership 
fees, enhancement grants, and normal research contracts by organizations from the various sectors of the electric utility and power 
industry, including national laboratories and private interests. The purpose of the center is to collaborate in enhancing the excellence 
of a wide range of research and graduate-level degree programs in nuclear power systems. This primary purpose is accomplished by 
supporting interested faculty and students' involvement in basic and applied research directly relevant to the needs of the 
multifaceted nuclear power industry. Motivation to work with the center derives from the close University/membership interaction, 
the leverage afforded members via pooled resources, and the enhanced professional and research opportunities provided to faculty 
and students in nuclear power engineering. 

The current research program involves faculty from the Department of Nuclear Engineering. 

Electron Microscope Facilities 

There are four electron microscope facilities at NC State available to graduate students and faculty for research purposes. The 
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Center for Electron Microscopy is located in Gardner Hall, the Engineering Research 
Microscope Facility is in Burlington Engineering Labs, and the Department of Wood and Paper Science Electron Microscopy Lab is 
in Biltmore Hall. The College of Veterinary Medicine Laboratory for Advanced Electron and Light Optical Methods (LAELOM) is 
located at 4700 Hillsborough Street in Raleigh. 

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Center for Electron Microscopy 

J. M. Mackenzie, Jr., Coordinator, CALS Center for Electron Microscopy 

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Center for Electron Microscopy occupies approximately 300 square feet in the 
basement of Gardner Hall. It is a centralized facility that services the ultra-structural needs of twenty-two departments. 

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Center for Electron Microscopy offers complete service support in all areas of 
Biological Electron Microscopy. The Center has two scanning microscopes: a Philips 505T and JEOL 5900LV which has low 
vacuum capabilities and two transmission electron microscopes: a JEOL lOOS and a Philips 400T. Both scanners are equipped with 
all of the necessary biological, preparatory equipment including a Balzers freeze-etch apparatus. 

The Center provides advanced, digital imaging capabilities. All computers including those on dedicated instruments are networked to 
two high-speed servers and to our University system. We provide access for Macintosh, PC and UNIX based systems allowing 
transparent information transfer regardless of user's platform preference. Our servers provide support for both Windows NT and 
Novell Clients. 

Formal instruction is provided through the Microbiology curriculum for transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron 
microscopy, ultramicrotomy and digital imaging. The Center also provides support, service, and training in a wide variety of 
advanced digital imaging. Advanced techniques are usually taught on an individual basis. 



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Institute of Statistics 

Sastry G. Pantula. Director 

The Institute of Statistics is comprised of two sections, one at NC State and the other at UNC-Chapel Hill. At NC State, the Institute 
of Statistics sponsors statistical collaborations within the university and with its partners in industry and government. It also sponsors 
methodological and theoretical research in the statistical sciences and cross-disciplinary research. The Institute coordinates the 
teaching of statistics at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Instructional fiinctions and the granting of degrees are performed by 
the Department of Statistics, which fonns a part of the Institute. 

Institute for Transportation Research and Education 

Nagui Rouphail, Director 

The Institute for Transportation Research and Education conducts research and training for numerous public agencies at the federal, 
state, and local levels of government and for some private firms. Established in 1978, the Institute conducts programs in public transit 
operations, highway operations, transportation finance, geographical information systems, pupil transportation, and technology 
transfer. The Institute is also the home of the Center for Transportation and the Environment, a prominent national research facility. 

Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering Institute 

T. J. Hodgson, Director 

The Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering (IMSE) Institute was established in 1984. IMSE provides multidisciplinary 
graduate-level education and practical training opportunities in the theory and practice of integrated manufacturing systems 
engineering at the masters level. IMSE focuses on providing a manufacturing presence and a program environment in the College of 
Engineering where faculty, graduate students and industry can engage cooperatively in multidisciplinary graduate education, basic 
and applied research, and technology transfer in areas of common interest related to modem manufacturing systems technology. The 
objective of the IMSE program is to offer students with traditional discipline backgrounds in engineering and the physical sciences an 
opportunity to broaden their understanding of the multidisciplinary area of manufacturing systems. Core areas of concentration are 
offered in manufacturing systems, logistics, and mechatronics. 

Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center 

B. Pourdeyhimi, Director 

Nonwovens Cooperative Center (NCRC) was established in 1991 and has been funded by National Science Foundation (NSF), State 
of North Carolina and industrial membership. The NCRC is located at the College of Textiles in the Centennial Campus. The Center 
serves the nonwovens industry through its programs of generic fundamental and applied research in the technologies of the industry 
as well as through an active program of technology transfer. The core research program centered on product performance, process 
development and analysis, and materials application/development. The Center also pursues non-core research projects sponsored by 
companies on specific problems on a propriety basis. 

The Center provides opportunities to gain hands-on experience in nonwovens research to students studying toward B.S., M.S., and 
Ph.D. degrees. Faculty members from NCSU, Georgia Tech, Clemson University, University of Tennessee, etc., are involved in 
several research projects funded by NCRC. 

Major industrial members include DuPont, Freudenberg, PGI, P&G, 3M, Albany International. Cotton, Inc., Wcllman. Goulston, 
Fiber Visions, Fiber Innovation Technology, Kimberly Cla 

Nuclear Services 

Scott Lassell, Manager 

Specialized nuclear service facilities are available to the university faculty, students, state and federal agencies, and industry. The 
purpose of these facilities is to further the use of nuclear technology in engineering research and in scientific and public service 
programs. The facilities include: a 1 megawatt steady-state, pool-type, nuclear research reactor (PULSTAR) w ith a variety of test 
facilities; a neutron activation analysis and radioisotope laboratory; a prompt gamma facility; a neutron radiography facility and a 
low level counting laboratory equipped with liquid scintillation systems and alpha spectrometry systems. 

Nuclear Services also provides short courses in radioactivity usage, and laboratory experiments for related courses in other 
departments. 

The 50,000 square-foot Burlington Engineering Laboratories complex houses the Department of Nuclear Engineering and the 
Department of Materials Science and Engineering with their associated offices and laboratories. All of the facilities including the 
Pulstar reactor are on the NC State campus. 

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) 

NC State has been a sponsoring institution of Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) since 1949. ORAU is a private, not-for- 
profit consortium of colleges and universities and a management and operating contractor for the 

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U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) with principle offices located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Founded in 1946, ORAU provides and 
develops capabilities crucial to the nation's technology infrastructure, particularly in energy, education, health, and the environment. 
ORAU works with and for its member institutions to help faculty and students gain access to federal research facilities; to keep 
members informed about opportunities for fellowship, scholarship, and research appointments; and to organize research alliances 
among our members in areas where their collective strengths can be focused on issues of national importance. Contact Ray Fomes, 
(919)515-7865 for more information about ORAU programs or see www.orau.org. 

Plant Disease and Insect Clinic 

Tom Melton, Director 

The Plant Disease and Insect Clinic (PDIC) provides a unique diagnostic and educational service to plant growers in North Carolina. 
It is an integral part of the extension program in the Plant Pathology and Entomology Departments. The PDIC receives 
appro-ximately 3,500 problem samples each year. County Agents, Extension Specialists and growers submit samples from nurseries, 
greenhouses, agricultural crops, forests and urban landscapes. This provides an opportunity to observe and work with practical 
problems currently developing and causing damage. 

Rapid changes in agricultural technology influence the range of pest problems encountered and require new types of assays and more 
sophisticated laboratory examinations. Plant problems must be correctly diagnosed and proper control strategies employed as quickly 
as possible for growers to minimize losses. The PDIC provides a vital link between the numerous highly specialized resources and 
faculty members at NC State and problems as they arise in the field. New or unusual outbreaks of plant diseases and insects can be 
quickly detected through the PDIC. 

Power Semiconductor Research Center 

B. J. Baliga, Director 

The Power Semiconductor Research Center was established as an industrial consortium at NC State University on July 1 , 1 99 1 . It has 
garnered support from around the world with more than a dozen companies participating in the venture. The mission of the center is 
to perform fundamental studies on semiconductor technology for power electronics applications. Although many centers have been 
established in the past for performing research in the area of microelectronics, PSRC was the first center to focus the research towards 
power electronics applications. The power electronics that will benefit from this research have widespread utility in society. These 
applications are computer power supplies and automotive electronics at relatively low operating voltages (50 to 100 volts); displays, 
telecommunications, appliance controls, and motor drives at medium operating voltages (300 to 1,500 volts); and traction (electric 
trains), and power transmission systems at high operating voltages (2,000 to 10,000 volts). Power semiconductor devices determine 
the pace for technological advancements in power systems because of the continuing trend to reduce size and weight and to improve 
the efficiency. This has important social implications in terms of conservation of fossil fuels and reduction of environmental 
pollution. 

The applications require three basic components: ( 1 ) three terminal power switches, (2) power rectifiers, and (3) power/high voltage 
integrated circuits. The research program at PSRC was structured with the goal of developing improved power semiconductor chips 
in all of these three categories from a short and long term perspective. The following research thrust areas have been worked on since 
the inception of the center: (a) Power rectifiers, (b) Power MOS-Gated Thyristors, (c) Large Area Power MOS Technology, (d) 
licensed Isolated Devices for Power Integrated Circuits, (e) Silicon Carbide Technology for Power Devices, and (f) Cryogenic 
Operation of Power Devices. Although the research is directed toward the development of generic, pre-competitive technology, care 
has been taken to maintain strong industrial relevance. Silicon devices have been developed which allow 2 to 20 fold improvement in 
perfonnance for low voltage applications. This technology has already been licensed for product introduction. Theoretically 
projected performance of silicon carbide high voltage devices has been confirmed experimentally. This technology is expected to 
play an important role in the 21st century. The research has been documented and shared with the sponsors in the form of 45 patents 
and 259 technical reports provided to them over the last 1 years of operation. Due to the strong support of the international industrial 
community, this center is now recognized as the premier research organization for power semiconductor technology in the world. 

Precision Engineering Center 

Thomas A. Dow, Director 

The Precision Engineering Center, established in 1982, is a multidisciplinary research and graduate engineering program dedicated to 
providing new technology for high precision manufacturing. It encompasses measurement and fabrication of optical, electronic, or 
mechanical devices where the tolerances required for operation are on the order of 1 part in 100,000; that is, for a 25mm ( 1 inch) long 
part the error must be less than 250nm (250 x 10-9). Components that need this technology include contact lenses and other optical 
components, hard disk heads for computer memory devices, integrated circuits, space telescopes, injection molding dies, bearings 
and gears. Current projects in the Center involve development of new mechanical designs and control algorithms, novel actuators that 
include piezoelectric or magnetic drivers, unique fabrication and measurement techniques and high-speed controllers to implement 
these concepts. With support from government and industry, the PEC pulls together faculty, staff, and students from across the 
university to develop new ideas and transfer those ideas to US industry. 



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The Research Analytical Instrumentation Facility (AIF) 

P. E. Russell. Director, Analytical Instrumentation Facility 

The Research Analytical Instrumentation Facility (AIF) provides NC State faculty and students with the highest level of modem 
microanalysis instrumentation currently available as well as trained specialists to assist with teaching, instrument operation, and 
experimental design. The unique combination of extensive analytical instrumentation and specialized staff make AIF a valuable asset 
to both teaching and research at all levels. AIF staff provides the expertise to access AlF's state of the art analytical capabilities, 
conduct training and provide guidance to students. AIF is located in the Engineering Graduate Research Center on the NCSU 
Centennial Campus. This laboratory space, located in the mixed-use (private industry/academics) environment of Centennial 
Campus, provides the optimum environment for teaching, research and technology transfer. AIF analytical capabilities encompass 
analyses of materials including ceramics, metals, semiconductors, polymers, and biological materials. The Environmental Scanning 
Electron Microscope (ESEM), which can operate at near atmospheric pressure, gives AIF the capability of providing electron 
microscopy and EDS (Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy) elemental analysis on wet, oily, and/or non conductive samples 
including biological, polymeric, textile, and other materials. The ESEM facility is extensively used by undergraduate students in a 
wide range of disciplines. AIF has extensive capabilities in the areas of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Tunneling 
Microscopy (STM), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM), 
Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometry (XPS), Auger Electron Spectrometry, (AES), Focus 
Ion Bean micromachines (FIB), and metallography. In addition, AIF has extensive facilities for specimen preparation and digital 
photography for the physical sciences. 

Southeastern Plant Environment Laboratory— Phytotron 

J. F. Thomas, Director 

The Southeastern Plant Laboratory, commonly called the phytotron, is a facility especially designed for research dealing with the 
response of biological organisms to their environment. The high degree of control within 60 growth chambers makes it possible to 
duplicate any climate from tropical rain forests to arid desert. 

The NC State phytotron concentrates on applied and basic research related to agricultural problems encountered in the southeastern 
United States. The ability to control all phases of the environment, however, allows inclusion of research dealing with all aspects of 
plant science. 

The facilities are available to the resident research staff, participants in NC State's graduate research program, and to foreign visiting 
scientists. 

Triangle Universities Laboratory 

Werner Tomow. Director 

TUNL is a laboratory for nuclear physics research, funded by the US Department of Energy. Located on the campus of Duke 
University in Durham, the laboratory is staffed by faculty members and students from Duke University, UNC-Chapel Hill, and NC 
State. There is extensive collaboration between the participating universities and with visiting physicists from the United States and 
abroad. The accelerators are a 15-MeV tandem Van de Graaff accelerator and a 4-MeV Van de Graaff accelerator. Polarized and 
pulsed beams are available as well as cryogenically polarized targets. In addition, TUNL physicists perform experiments at major 
national and international nuclear physics. 

University Advancement 

Terry G. Wood, Vice Chancellor for University Advancement 

The mission of University Advancement at NC State is to enhance the perception of and knowledge about the university through 
internal and external communications; to provide alumni, students, and friends with programs and services that instill loyalty and 
pride: to secure resources which will enhance the academic quality of the institution; to be good stewards of its endowments and 
advance the growth of investment at NC State; and to promote advocacy of the university. Visit the University Advancement web site 
at wvvw.ncsu.edu/univ relations/uni vadv.html. 

Advancement Services supports the operation of Alumni Relations, University Development, Public Affairs, and other units 
involved with the external mission of NC State by managing the donor/alumni database, conducting donor research, processing and 
receipting private gifts, maintaining financial records (budgets, payroll, personnel, purchasing, reimbursement, etc.), administering 
the corporate matching program, managing the donor prospect tracking system, providing donor stewardship, organizing 
stewardship/recognition activities, and staffmg the needs of the NC State Foundation, the Endowment Fund Board, and the Alumni 
Association business operation. 

The Office of Alumni Relations strives to involve alumni in the life of NC State University and to perpetuate their pride in their 
alma mater by communicating the university's achievements and distinctions. Alumni Relations offers a premier membership 
program that provides a host of benefits to those who join; organizes alumni activities such as reunions, tailgates, and area club 
meetings; arranges lifelong educational opportunities; enriches student experiences with activities such as homecoming and senior 
recognition; supports the prestigious Caldwell .Mumni Scholarship Program, and provides alumni ser\ ices such as insurance, a credit 
card, and NC State apparel. Through the pages of NC State, the alumni magazine, and a multi-faceted web site. Alumni Relations 

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promotes the university with infonnation about notable alumni and university achievements. Students and parents are invited to visit 
the Office of Alumni Relations, located in the Alumni Memorial Building on Pullen Road. To inquire about these programs or 
service, call (919)515-3375 or 800/NCS.ALUM; visit the web site at www.alumni.ncsu.edu. 

University Development works with the colleges and programs at North Carolina State University to secure private financial 
support for priority projects and programs. This support may come from individuals (alumni, parents, students, faculty, staff, and 
friends), corporations, philanthropic foundations and other organizations. 

University Development provides services to the colleges and programs in gift planning, corporate and foundation relations and the 
annual ftmd. University Development also facilitates external and internal communication among flindraisers, and coordinates 
approaches to prospective donors. 

The Office of Public Affairs provides research-based public relations and marketing planning and implementation for the university, 
assisting and supporting the efforts of individual colleges. The goal of the unit is to build long-term relationships with key publics to 
strengthen the university's identity and brand image. 

Public Affairs includes the offices of News Services and Creative Services. News Services promotes the university's achievements 
via news stories and briefings. Creative Services provides publications and web site design as well as video production for campus 
units. Public Affairs also is responsible for coordinating community relations, providing marketing support for fund-raising efforts, 
staging special events for University Advancement and the Chancellor's Office, and working closely with the Chancellor's Office on 
external affairs projects. 



UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF NORTH CAROLINA 

©History of the University of North Carolina 
In North Carolina, all the public educational institutions that grant baccalaureate degrees are part of the 
University of North Carolina. North Carolina State University is one of the 16 constituent institutions of the 
multi-campus state university. 
The University of North Carolina, chartered by the N.C. General Assembly, in 1789, was the first public 
university in the United States to open its doors and the only one to graduate students in the eighteenth century. 
The first class was admitted in Chapel Hill in 1795. For the next 136 years, the only campus of the University of 
North Carolina was at Chapel Hill. 

In 1 877, the N.C. General Assembly began sponsoring additional institutions of higher education, diverse in origin and purpose. Five 
were historically black institutions, and another was founded to educate American Indians. Several were created to prepare teachers 
for the public schools. Others had a technological emphasis. One was a training school for performing artists. 

In I93I, the N.C. General Assembly redefined the University of North Carolina to include three state-supported institutions: the 
campus at Chapel Hill, (now the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), North Carolina State College (now North Carolina 
State University at Raleigh), and Women's College (now the University of North Carolina at Greensboro). The new muhi-campus 
University operated with one board of trustees and one president. By 1969, three additional campuses had joined the University 
through legislative action: the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, the University of North Carolina at Asheville, and the 
University of North Carolina at Wilmington. 

In 1971, the General Assembly passed legislation bringing into the University of North Carolina the state's ten remaining public 
senior institutions, each of which had until then been legally separate: Appalachian State University, East Carolina University, 
Elizabeth City State University, Fayetteville State University, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, North 
Carolina Central University, the North Carolina School of the Arts, Pembroke State University, Western Carolina University, and 
Winston-Salem State University. This action created the current 16-campus University. (In 1985, the North Carolina School of 
Science and Mathematics, a residential high school for gifted students, was declared an affiliated school of the University; and in 
1996, Pembroke State University was renamed The University of North Carolina at Pembroke through legislative action.) 

The UNC Board of Governors is the policy-making body legally charged with "the general determination, control, supervision, 
management, and governance of all atTairs of the constituent institutions." It elects the president, who administers the University. The 
32 voting members of the Board of Governors are elected by the General Assembly for four-year terms. Former board chainnen and 
board members who are former governors of North Carolina may continue to serve for limited periods as non-voting members 
emeriti. The president of the UNC Association of Student Governments, or that student's designee, is also a non-voting member. 

Each of the 16 constituent institutions is headed by a chancellor, who is chosen by the Board of Governors on the president's 
nomination and is responsible to the president. Each institution has a board of trustees, consisting of eight members elected by the 
Board of Governors, four appointed by the governor, and the president of the student body, who serves ex-oITicio. (The NC School of 
the Arts has two additional ex-offlcio members.) Each board of trustees holds extensive powers over academic and other operations 
of its institution on delegation from the Board of Governors. 



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UNC Board of Governors 

J. Bradley Wilson, Chair 
G. Irvin Aldridge, Vice Chair 
Patsy B. Perry, Secretary 



* Emeritus member 
** ExolTicio member 



Bradly T. Adcock 

James G. Babb 

Brent D. Barringer 

J. Addison Bell 

R. Steve Bowden 

F. Edward Broadwell, Jr. 

William L. Bums 

C. ClitTord Cameron* 



Anne W. Gates 
John F. A. V. Cecil 
Bert Collins 
John W. Davis HI 
Johnathan Ducote** 
Ray S. Farris 
Dudley E. Flood 
Hannah D. Gage 



Willie J. Gilchrist 
H. Frank Grainger 
Peter D. Hans 
James E. Holshouser* 
Peter Keber 
Adelaide Daniels Key 
G. Leroy Lail 
Charles H. Mercer 



Charles S. Norwood, Jr. 
Gary C. Owen 
Jim W. Phillips, Jr. 
Gladys Ashe Robinson 
Benjamin S. Ruffin* 
Estelle "Bunny" Sanders 
J. Craig Souza 
Priscilla Patterson Taylor 
Robert F. Warwick 



Officers of tfie University of North Carolina 

Molly Corbett Broad, B.A., M.A., President 

Gretchen Bataille, B.A., M.A., ?\\.Y)., Senior Vice President. Academic Affairs 

Bart Corgnati, Secretaty of the University 

Jetf Davies, B.S., M.S., Vice President. Finance. andCFO 

J. B. Milliken, B.A.. J.D., Senior Vice President. University Affairs 

Leslie Winner, A.B., LL.B., Vice President and General Counsel 

Alan R. Mabe, Vice President for Academic Planning 

Russ Lea. Vice President for Research and Sponsored Programs 

Robyn Render, B.S., Vice President for Information Resources and Chief Information Officer 

North Carolina State University Board of Trustees 

Peaches Gunter Blank, Chair 



D. McQueen Campbell, III. 
Derick S. Close 
Ann Goodnight 
Suzanne Gordon 
Robert B. Jordan, III 
Bob Mattocks, III 



Wendell Murphy 
Richard G. Robb 
C. Richard Vaughn 
Steve F. Warren 
Cassius S. Williams 



Ex officio: Tony Caravano, President, NC State Student Body 

North Carolina State University Council 

Marye Anne Fox, Chancellor 

James L. Oblinger, Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs 

George Worsley, Vice Chancellor for Finance and Business 

Thomas H. Stafford, Jr., Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 

Terry G. Wood, Vice Chancellor of University Advancement 

Robert S. Sowell, Dean. The Graduate School 

Mary Elizabeth Kurz, Vice Chancellor and General Counsel 

John G. Gilligan, Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Studies 

Lee Fowler, Director Athletics 

Johnny C. Wynne, Interim Dean. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Marvin J. Malecha, Dean. College of Design 

Kathryn Moore. Dean. College of Education 

Nino A. Masnari, Dean. College of Engineering 

Larry Nielsen, Dean. College of Natural Resources 

Linda P. Brady, Dean. College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

Jon W. Bartley. Dean. College of Management 

Daniel Solomon, Dean. College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

A. Blanton Godfrey, Dean. College of Textiles 

Oscar J. Fletcher, Dean. College of Veterinary Medicine 

Dennis M. Daley, Faculty Chair 

Susan K. Nutter, Vice Provost and Director. NC State Libraries 

Tony Caravono, Student Body President 

Will Quick, Student Senate President 

Chad Jordan, Graduate Student Association President. Graduate Student Association 



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North Carolina State University 



Jon Barnwell, Chair. Staff Senate 

Laura Massengill, Chair-Elect, Staff Senate 

Clare M. Kristofco, Executive Assistant to the Chancellor, Office of the Chancellor and Secretary of the University 

Andy Willis, Assistant to the Chancellor for External Affairs 

Nina Allen, Chair-Elect of the Faculty 

P.J. Teal, Assistant to the Chancellor - Administration 



POLICY ON ILLEGAL DRUGS 

The following policy on illegal drugs was adopted by the North Carolina State University Board of Trustees April 16, 1988 - Last 
Revised, April 16, 1999. 

1. Purpose 

1.1 Reflecting its concern over the threat which illegal drugs constitute to higher education communities, the Board of Governors 
of the University of North Carolina adopted a policy on illegal drugs on January 15, 1988. The Board of Governors" policy 
requires each constituent institution's Board of Trustees to develop a policy on illegal drugs applicable to all students, faculty 
members, administrators, and other employees. The policy for each campus must address particular circumstances and needs 
while being fully consistent with specified minimum requirements for enforcement and penalties. 

1.2 To assist North Carolina State University in its continuing efforts to meet the threat of illegal drugs, and to comply with the 
Board of Governors' policy, the Board of Trustees adopts the policy set forth below. This policy is intended to demonstrate the 
University's primary commitment to education, counseling, rehabilitation, and elimination of illegal dnigs, as well as its 
determination to impose penalties in the event of violation of state and federal drug laws consistent with due process. 

2. Education, Counseling, and Rehabilitation 

2.1 North Carolina State University shall maintain a program of education designed to help all members of the University 
community avoid involvement with illegal drugs. The educational program shall emphasize the incompatibility of the use of 
distribution of illegal drugs with the goals of the University, the legal consequences of involvement with illegal dnigs, the 
medical and psychological implications of the use of illegal drugs, and the ways in which illegal drugs jeopardize an individual's 
present accomplishments and future opportunities. Specific elements of the education program are: 

2.1.1 Publicizing the University's policy in the Student Code of Conduct, the undergraduate and graduate catalogs, and other 
publications distributed to students, faculty, administrators, and other employees. 

2.1.2 Continuing and expanding the drug education program conducted by Student Health Services 

2.1.3 Continuing development of courses on drug education 

2.1.4 Continuing the drug education component of the employees' Wellness Program 

2.1.5 Increasing the awareness and utilization of the University's Employee Assistance Program (LAP) 

2.2 The University shall disseminate information about drug counseling and rehabilitation services that are available to members 
of the University community. Persons who voluntarily avail themselves of such services shall be assured that applicable 
professional standards of confidentiality will be observed and that such participation will not be the basis for disciplinary action. 
Specific counseling and rehabilitation etTorts include: 

2.2.1 continuing the evaluation and referral services of the Counseling Center for out-patient and in-patient rehabilitation; 

2.2.2 continuing the consolation and evaluation portions of the Student Health Service's drug education program 

2.2.3 utilizing the Employee Assistance Program's referral to existing community-based counseling and rehabilitation 
services. 

3. Enforcement and Penalties 

3.1 Students, faculty members, administrators, and other employees are responsible, as citizens, for knowing about and 
complying with the provisions of North Carolina law that make it a crime to possess, sell, deliver, or manufacture those drugs 
designated collectively as "controlled substances" in Article 5 of Chapter 90 of the North Carolina General Statutes. The 
University will initiate its own disciplinary proceeding against a student, faculty member, administrator, or other employee when 
the offense is deemed to affect the interests of the University. Penalties will be imposed by the University in accordance with 
procedural safeguards applicable to disciplinary actions against students, faculty members, administrators, and other employees, 
as required by Section 503D(3) and Section 603 of the University Code, by Board of Governors' policies applicable to other 
employees exempt from the State Personnel Act and by regulation of the State Personnel Commission. The penalties to be 
imposed by the University may range from written warnings with probationary status to expulsions from enrollment and 
discharges from employment. However, the following minimum penalties, as prescribed by the Board of Governors, shall be 
imposed for the particular offenses described. 

3.2 Trafficking in Illegal Drugs 

3.2.1 For the illegal manufacture, sale, or delivery, or possession with intent to manufacture, sell, or deliver, of any 
controlled substance identified in Schedule 1, N.C. General Statutes 90-89, or Schedule 11, N.C. General Statues 90-90 
(including, but not limited to: heroin, mescaline, lysergic acid diethylamide, opium, cocaine, amphetamine, methaqualine), 
any student shall be expelled and any faculty member, administrator, or other employee shall be discharged. 



203 



North Carolina State University 



3.2.2 For a first orfense involving the illegal manufacture, sale, or deliver, or possession with intent to manufacture, sell, or 
deliver, of any controlled substance identified in Schedules III through VI, N.C. General Statutes 90-91 through 90-94 
(including, but not limited to, marijuana, phenobarbital, codeine), the minimum penalty shall be suspension from enrollment 
or from employment for a period of at least one semester or its equivalent. (Employees subject to the State Personnel Act are 
governed by regulations of the State Personnel Commission. Because the minimum penalty specified in this section and 
required by the Board of Governors exceeds the maximum period of suspension without pay that is permitted by the State 
Personnel Commission regulations, the penalty for a first offense for employees subject to the State Personnel Act is 
discharge. For a second offense, any student shall be expelled and any faculty member, administrator, or other employee 
shall be discharged. 

3.2.3 For a second of other subsequent offenses involving the illegal possession of controlled substances, progressively 
more severe penalties shall be imposed, including expulsion of students and discharge of faculty members, administrators, 
or other employees. 

3.3 Illegal Possession of Drugs 

3.3.1 For a first offense involving the illegal possession of any controlled substance identified in Schedules III through IV, 
N.C. General Statutes 90-89, or Schedule II, N.C. General Statutes through 90-90, the minimum penalty shall be suspension 
from enrollment or from employment for a period of at least one semester or its equivalent (Employees subject to the State 
Personnel Act are governed by regulations of the State Personnel Commission. Because the minimum penalty specified in 
this section and required by the Board of Governors exceeds the maximum period of suspension without pay that is 
permitted by the State Personnel Commission regulations, the penalty for a first offense for employees subject to the State 
Personnel Act is discharge.) 

3.3.2 For a first offense involving the illegal possession of any controlled substance identified in Schedules III through VI, 
N.C. General Statues 90-91 through 90-94, the minimum penalty shall be probation, for a period to be determined on a case- 
by-case basis. A person on probation must agree to participate in a drug education and counseling program, consent to 
regular drug testing, and accept such other conditions and restrictions, including a program of community service, as the 
Chancellor or the Chancellor's designee deems appropriate. Refusal or failure to abide by the terms of probation shall result 
in suspension from enrollment or from employment for any unexpired balance of the prescribed period of probation. 

3.3.3 For a second or other subsequent offenses involving the illegal possession of controlled substances, progressively 
more severe penalties shall be imposed, including expulsion of students and faculty members, administrators, or other 
employees. 

3.4 Suspension Pending Final Disposition 

When a student, faculty member, administrator, or other employee has been charged by the University with a violation of 
policies concerning illegal drugs, he or she may be suspended fonn enrollment or employment before initiation or completion of 
regular disciplinary proceedings if assuming the truth of the charges, the Chancellor or, in the Chancellor's absence, the 
Chancellors's designee concludes that the person's continued presence within the University community would constitute a clear 
and immediate danger to the health or welfare of other members of the University community; provided, a hearing on the 
charges against the suspended person shall be held as promptly as possible thereafter. 

4. Coordinator of Drug Education 

The Associate Vice Chancellor for Human Resources and the Director of Student .ludicial Programs will serve as the coordinators of 
drug education for employees (faculty and staff) and students respectively. Acting under the authority of the Chancellor, each will be 
responsible for overseeing all actions and programs relating to this institutional policy in their respective areas. 

5. Reporting 

Annually the Chancellor shall submit to the Board of Trustees a report on campus activities related to illegal drugs for the preceding 
year. The report shall include, as a minimum, the following: ( 1 ) a listing of the major education activities conducted during the year; 
(2) a report on any illegal drug-related incidents, including any sanctions imposed; (3) an assessment by the Chancellor of the 
effectiveness of the campus program; (4) any proposed changes in the policy on illegal drugs. A copy of the report shall be provided 
to the President. 



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North Carolina State University 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

The courses listed in this catalog are planned for the academic year 2004-2005 unless indicated. 

The course descriptions are arranged first in alphabetical order according to course prefix reflecting the department or discipline of 
the course. Some courses are cross-listed, indicating that they are offered in two or more departments or disciplines. Within each of 
the prefix groups, the course descriptions are arranged by course number. Numbers 100-299 are courses intended primarily for 
freshmen and sophomores. Numbers 300-499 are courses intended primarily for juniors and seniors; numbers 490-498 are seminar, 
project, or special topics courses; number 499 is for undergraduate research. 

Courses numbered 500 - 600 are taught at the Masters level and most are available to advanced undergraduates. Doctoral courses are 
numbered 700 - 899. Graduate courses numbered at the 500 and 700 levels are letter graded (A+ ... F), while 600 and 800 level 
courses are S/U graded. Courses regularly letter graded (A+ ... F) may not be taken for S/U grading by graduate students. Courses 
numbered in the 900 series are open to College of Veterinary Medicine students. 

A typical course description shows the prefix, number, and title followed by prerequisite, credit and offering infonnation. 
Prerequisites are courses or levels of achievement that a student is expected to have completed successfully prior to enrolling in a 
course. Corequisites are courses which should be taken concurrently by students who have not previously completed the 
Corequisites. Prerequisites or Corequisites for a given course may be waived by the instructor of the course or section. It is the 
student's responsibility to satisfy prerequisites, or obtain from the instructor written waiver of prerequisites, for any course in which 
he or she may enroll. Failure to satisfy prerequisites may result in removal from enrollment in the course. Consent of the department 
is required for all practicum and individual special topics or special problems courses as well as internships and thesis or dissertation 
research. Some courses also have restrictive statements, such as "Credit in both MA 141 and MA 13 1 is not allowed." Restrictive 
statements for a given course may be waived only by a college dean. 

An example of credit information is: 4(3-2-1). The 4 indicates the number of semester hours credit awarded for satisfactory 
completion of the course. The (3-2-1 ) normally indicates that the course meets for three hours of lecture or seminar each week and for 
two hours of laboratory, and one hour of problem or studio each week. Some courses are offered for variable credit, and a listing of 1- 
6 indicates that from one to six semester hours of credit may be earned as arranged by the department writing the course. 

Other abbreviations used in the course descriptions are: grad., graduate; undergrad., undergraduate; sr., senior; jr., junior; soph., 
sophomore; fr., freshman; lab, laboratory; lect., lecture; and sem., seminar. 



Course Codes 

AC Agricultural Communications 

ACC Accounting 

ADN Art and Design 

AEE Agricultural and Extension Education 

AFS Africana Studies 

ALS Agricultural and Life Sciences 

ANS Animal Science 

ANT Anthropology 

ARC Architecture 

ARE Agricultural and Resource Economics 

ARS Arts Studies 

AS Aerospace Studies 

BAE Biological & Agricultural Engineering 

BCH Biochemistry 

BIO Biological Sciences 

BIT Biotechnology 

BME Biomedical Engineering 

BO Botany 

BUS Business Management 

CE Civil Engineering 

CH Chemistry 

CHE Chemical Engineering 

CL Comparative Literature 

CNR College of Natural Resources 

COM Communication 



CS Crop Science 

CSC Computer Science 

D Design 

DAN Physical Education - Dance 

DF Design Fundamentals 

E Engineering 

EC Economics 

ECD Counselor Education 

ECE Electrical and Computer Engineering 

ECI Curriculum and Instruction 

ED Education 

EDP Educational Psychology 

EGM Mechatronics 

ELP Educational Leadership & Program Evaluation 

EMS Mathematics/Science/Technology Education 

ENG English 

ENT Entomology 

EOE Occupational Education 

ES Environmental Science 

ET Environmental Technology 

FL Foreign Languages & Literatures 

FLC Foreign Languages & Literatures- Chinese 

FLE Foreign Languages & Literatures- English 

FLF Foreign Languages & Literatures- French 

FLG Foreign Languages & Literatures- German 



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North Carolina State University 



FLH Foreign Languages & Literatures- Hebrew NR 

FLI Foreign Languages & Literatures- Italian NS 

FLJ Foreign Languages & Literatures- Japanese NTR 

FLK Foreign Languages & Literatures- Swahili PCC 

FLN Foreign Languages & Literatures- Hindi PE 

FLP Foreign Languages & Literatures- Portuguese PEC 

FLR Foreign Languages & Literatures- Russian PEP 

FLS Foreign Languages & Literatures- Spanish PEG 

FOR Forestry PEH 

FS Food Science PEO 

FW Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences PES 

GC Graphic Communications PHI 

GD Graphic Design PMS 

GEO Geography PO 

GN Genetics PP 

GRK Foreign Languages and Literatures- Greek PRT 

HA History of" Art PS 

HI History PSY 

HON Honors PY 

HS Horticultural Science REL 

HSS Humanities and Social Sciences SOC 

ID Industrial Design SSC 

IE Industrial Engineering ST 

LAR Landscape Architecture STS 

LAT Foreign Languages and Literature- Latin SW 

LOG Logic T 

M Management TAM 

MA Mathematics TE 

MAE Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering TED 

MB Microbiology TMS 

MDS Multidisciplinary Studies TOX 

MEA Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences TT 

MS Military Science VMF 

MSE Materials Science and Engineering VMS 

Ml Medical Textiles WGS 

MUS Music WPS 

NE Nuclear Engineering ZO 



Natural Resources 

Naval Science 

Nutrition 

Polymer and Color Chemistry 

Physical Education 

Physical Education- Coaching 

Physical Education- Fitness 

Physical Education- Golf 

Physical Education- Health Studies 

Physical Education- Outdoors 

Physical Education- Sports 

Philosophy 

Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

Poultry Science 

Plant Pathology 

Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Physics 

Religion 

Sociology 

Soil Science 

Statistics 

Science Technology and Society 

Social Work 

Textiles 

Textile & Apparel Management 

Textile Engineering 

Technology Education 

Textile Material Science 

Toxicology 

Textile Technology 

Veterinary Science 

Veterinary Science 

Women's and Gender Studies 

Wood and Paper Science 

Zoology 



206 



AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATION 



AC 485 Natural Resources Advocacy. 3(2-3-0). S. Preq: ENG 321. 

Analysis of natural resources problems as they affect management agencies 
and user groups. Development of professional attitudes, policies, and skills 
needed for the management of sensitive natural resource issues through 
application of techniques in the field. Student presentations, demonstrations 
and development of natural resource planning models that integrate biological 
skills with management alternatives and are critiqued by resource field staff. 



ACCOUNTING 



ACC 100 Introduction to Accounting Profession. 1(1-0-0). F. 

Introduction to an accounting degree at NC State and the accounting 
profession, including career opportunities, certifications, professional 
organizations, required business skills, and ethics. 

ACC 210 Accounting I Concepts of Financial Reporting. 3(3-0-0). F, S, 
Sum. Financial reporting concepts, the accounting information generating 
process, reporting practices, financial statement preparation, and the 
interpretation and analysis of financial statements. Basic accounting principles 
and concepts, the accounting cycle, income measurement, and internal 
controls. 

ACC 211 Fundamentals of Accounting. 1(1-0-0). F, S, Sum. Coreq: ACC 
210. This course will introduce students to the technical aspects of accounting, 
basic accounting procedures, the accounting cycle, business transactions and 
financial statement preparation. Use of special journals and subsidiary 
ledgers, income statement and balance sheet concepts and standard setting. 

ACC 220 Introduction to Managerial Accounting. 3(3-0-1 ). F, S, Sum. 
Analysis of accounting data that are useful in managerial decision-making and 
in the control and evaluation of the decisions made within business 
organizations. An introduction to basic models, financial statement analysis, 
cost behavior analysis and cost control procedures. 

ACC 310 Intermediate Financial Accounting I. 3(3-0-0). F, S, Sum. 

Preq: ACC 21 1 with a grade of C- or better. Measurement and reporting issues 
related to cash, accounts receivable, inventories, operating and intangible 
assets, current and non-current liabilities, and stockholders' equity. 

ACC 311 Intermediate Financial Accounting II. 3(3-0-0). F, S, Sum. 

Preq: ACC 310 with a grade of C- or better. Theory and professional standards 
for analyzing and reporting financial topics beyond the balance sheet. 
Measurement and reporting issues related to leases, pensions, deferred taxes 
and cash flows are examined. 

ACC 320 Managerial Uses of Cost Data. 3(3-0-0). F, S. Sum. Preq: ACC 
220 with grade C- or better, M 200,MA 121 and MA 132 or equivalent, PHI 
elective, and EC 201. Coreq: BUS 350 and ENG 331 or 332 or 333. 
Managerial uses of cost data in planning, controlling, and evaluating 
organizational activities and in making business decisions. Budgeting, cost 
behavior, product costing and pricing, and decision-making frameworks. 

ACC 330 An Introduction To Income Taxation. 3(3-0-0). F, S. Sum. 
Preq: ACC 210 with a grade of C- or better. Basic income tax principles and 
procedures (including research and planning) with an emphasis on all types of 
entities and business transactions. Exposure to a range of tax concepts within 
the framework of financial reporting. 

ACC 340 An Introduction to Accounting Information Systems. 1(1-0- 
0). F, S. Preq: ACC 211 and ACC 220, both with a grade of C- or better. 
Coreq: BUS 340. Concepts in analysis, design, and development of accounting 
information systems. Emphasis on use and evaluation of accounting 
information systems and how they interface with management information 
systems. 

ACC 407 Business Law for Accountants. 3(3-0-0). F, S, Sum. Preq: EC 
201 or ARE 201. Credit may not be received for ACC 407 and any of the 
following: BUS 305, BUS 307, or ARE 306. Legal principles affecting the 
conduct of trade related to accountants. Personal and real property; contract 
law; negligence and accountants legal liability; business and the Constitution. 



ACC 410 Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting. 3(3-0-0). F, S. Preq: 
ACC 211. Accounting for state and local governments, including budgeting, 
audit issues, and financial analysis. Accounting for nonprofit organizations, 
including colleges and universities and healthcare organizations. 

ACC 411 Business Valuation. 3(3-0-0). F, S, Sum. Preq: ACC 210, BUS 
320, BUS 350. Conceptual framework of how businesses work, value 
generation and reporting. Interpretation of financial statements and their use 
in valuation of the firm. 

ACC 420 Strategic Finance and Planning. 3(3-0-0). F, S, Sum. Preq: 

ACC 220 with grade of C- or better. Strategic finance in planning, control, and 
evaluating organizational activities and in designing and implementing 
business strategies. Use of accounting in corporate management and business 
planning. Integration of performance measurement and cost control with 
corporate strategy. 

ACC 440 Accounting Information Systems. 3(3-0-0). F, S, Sum. Preq: 
BUS 340 and ACC 340, both with a grade of C- or better. Introduction of 
accounting-related design issues and internal control solutions to mitigate risks 
related to emerging information technologies (IT) and e-commerce systems. 
Focus on issues related to designing IT functions that incorporate effective 
general controls to manage IT within an organization, modeling key IT-based 
processes, and developing IT applications and information systems that 
include effective automated controls. 

ACC 450 Risk and Assurance. 3(3-0-0). F, S, Sum. Preq: ACC 31 1 with a 
grade of C- or better. Introduction to assurance services objectives, theory, and 
practices. Focuses on developing skills for interpreting business strategies and 
identifying related business risks, describing internal control solutions to those 
risks, identitying evidential sources, providing assurance about those risks and 
controls, and designing strategies to provide assurance services about the 
reliability of business information. 

ACC 470 Accounting Theory. 3(3-0-0). Preq: ACC 410 (312). Major 

concepts, problem areas and trends in accounting thought and practice, 
including a review of the most prominent controversies in current publications 
and the most recent relevant pronouncements of professional institutions. 

ACC 480 Accelerated Survey of Financial and Management 

Accounting. 3(3-0-0). F. Credit may not be received for both ACC 480 and 
ACC 220 or 280. Intended for graduate students and advanced undergraduates 
not majoring in Accounting or Management. Accelerated survey of basic 
concepts underlying accounting in profit-oriented firms: data measurement, 
summarization and reporting practices as a background for use of accounting 
information; content of published financial statements; and uses of accounting 
for management decisions in product costing, budgeting, and operations. 

ACC 490 Senior Seminar in Accounting. 3(3-0-0). S. Enrollment in this 
course is restricted to accounting majors in their final semester of study. PBS 
students admitted by permission of department head. Integration of financial, 
managerial, tax, and governmental accounting. Application of appropriate 
accounting methods to problem resolution. 

ACC 495 Special Topics in Accounting. 1-6. Preq: Consent of Instructor. 
Presentation of material not normally available in regular course offerings, or 
offering of new courses on a trial basis. 

ACC 498 Independent Study in Accounting. 1-6. F. S, Sum. Detailed 
investigation of topics of particular interest to advanced undergraduates under 
faculty direction on a tutorial basis. Credits and content determined by faculty 
member in consultation with the associate department head. 



ART AND DESIGN 



ADN 102 Design Fundamentals for Art & Design. 6(9-2-0). S. Preq: DF 
101. The second introductory studio in the fundamental concepts, skills and 
experiences of designing in two and three dimensions for Art & Design 
majors. 

.ADN 111 Two Dimensional Design for Non-Design Majors. 3(0-6-0). F, 
S. This course is not open to College of Design students. An mtroduction to 
the fundamentals of design studies through two-dimensional problems. The 
basic elements and concepts of design explored as abstract and applied 



207 



problems through design issues. Provides non-design students an inlroduetion 
to design principles and a language of design. 

ADN 112 Three Dimensional Design for Non-Design Majors. 3(0-6-0). 
F, S. This course is not open to School of Design students. An introduction to 
the fundamentals of design studies through three-dimensional problems. The 
basic elements and concepts of design explored as abstract and applied 
problems through the design issue. Provides non-design students a working 
knowledge of design principles and a language of design. 

ADN 202 Design Studio: Art & Design in Context. 6(0-9-0). S. Preq; DF 
101 and DF 102 or two studios. Investigative problem solving in visual 
communication in the human environment. Emphasis on visual language 
applied to specific contexts. 

ADN 212 Basic Photography. 3(2-2-0). F, S. Preq: DF 102. Introduction 
to the processes and visual skills necessary for the beginning photographer. 
Darkroom experimentation, pinhole camera, basic rudiments of camera use, 
film development and printing. Exploration of issues related to the quality of 
visual communication. 

ADN 219 Digital Imaging. 3(2-2-0). F, S. Preq: DF 102. Introduction to 
exploring, creating, and modifying images through the use of computers. 
Emphasis is on creativity, experimentation, and intuitive image making using 
various computer techniques. 

ADN 272 Printetl Textile Design. 3(0-6-0). F, S. Preq: A grade of C or 
better in DF 101, ADN 1 1 1 or ADN 112. Design and production of screen- 
printed, painted and pattern-dyed fabrics. Development of design abilities 
(color use, pattern generation) and technical skills (screen printing, painting, 
use of fabric dyes). Production of fabric samples, studies, yardage, and/or end 
products. Awareness of industrial processes. 

ADN 273 Fibers Materials and Processes. 3(0-6-0). F, S. Preq: DF 101 or 
ADN 111 or ADN 112. Introduction to historical and contemporary hand 
processes used by the textile designer. Students will learn a variety of textile 
techniques utilizing traditional and experimental methods. Emphasis will be on 
technical exploration and development. 

ADN 281 Basic Drawing. 3(0-6-0). F. Open only to College of Design 

Majors and Design Minors. A beginning descriptive drawing experience which 
teaches students to see, analyze, and transcribe observed subject matters. The 
transcription incorporates formal drawing issues (line, form, texture) with 
traditional and contemporary material space exploration. 

ADN 292 Special Topics in Design. 1-3. F, S. Topics of current interest in 
the College of Design. Used to develop new courses. 

ADN 302 Design Studio: History. Culture & Diversity. 6(0-9-0). S. 

Preq: Five studios and H.'V 202. Investigations into the historical, cultural, 
perceptual and aesthetic values and precedents of modem art/design 
movement. In a studio mode, emphasis is on research, documentation, 
synthetic and analytic activities. 

ADN 311 Basic Visual Laboratories. 3(0-6-0). F, S. Preq: Design Majors: 
DF 102; Non-Design Majors: ADN 111, 112. Basic activities that relate to the 
major design areas in the College of Design. Study of visual communication 
skills in areas of illustration, printmaking, and life drawing. The student elects 
instructor and area(s) of activity. 

ADN 312 Intermediate Photography. 3(2-2-0). F. S. Preq: ADN 212. 

Continuation of an advanced level of the skills and techniques developed in 
Basic Photography. Purpose is to develop use of camera as a perceptual tool to 
increase awareness and sensitivity of visual imagery. 

ADN 319 Introduction to Animation. 3(3-0-0). F, S. An intensive 

introduction to animation which integrates traditional hand generated 
animation, digital techniques and technology. Students will explore 
animation's fundamental principles of linear formats, sequenced movement 
and time-based imaging. 

ADN 384 Basic Painting. 3(0-6-0). F. Preq: DF 102: or both ADN 1 1 1 and 
ADN 1 12. Introduction to the principles of painting through class projects that 
expose students to different painting materials and techniques. Students learn 
to build a stretcher, size and prime a canvas as well as other rigid painting 
surfaces. Acrylic and oil paint used; projects assigned and open themes. 



ADN 386 Basic .Sculpture. 3(0-6-0). F. Preq: DF 101. ADN 112. Studio 
course introducing basic concepts, materials, and processes of sculpture. 
Instruction incorporates both traditional and contemporary form generation 
with emphasis on developing formal perception and projection. 

ADN 400 Design Studio. 6(0-9-0). F, S. Preq: DF 102 or written approval 
of Department Head and Dean. Course may be used to partially satisfy studio 
requirement in all undergraduate degree programs in the College of Design. 
Studio offering upper-level undergraduates the opportunity to intensively 
study general design issues (form, color, structure, proportions, scale, etc.). 

ADN 402 Design Studio: Practice and Technology. 6(0-9-0). S. Preq: 
Seven studios and ADN 219. Advanced Design studio emphasizing the 
exploration of past, current and potential future technologies within Design 
Department content areas (e.g., painting, sculpture, fibers, jewelry, color and 
light, etc.). Students are expected to work independently, develop their own 
problem statements. 

ADN 411 Visual Laboratory U. 3(0-6-0). F. S. Preq: DF 102; or both 

ADN 1 1 1 and ADN 1 12. May be taken for a minimum of 12 credit hours by 
College of Design students. Visual communication skills in the areas of life 
draw ing, illustration, painting, print making and sculpture. 

ADN 413 Synthetic Drawing. 3(2-3-0). Every 3rd Sem. Preq: DF 102; or 
ADN 111, ADN 1 12. Orthographic and axonometric projections, coordinating 
and perspective systems, and diagramming to facilitate the drawing of shapes 
and forms conceived by the designer in order to make visually precise 
simulations of design ideas. 

ADN 414 Color and Light. 3(3-0-0). F, S. Preq: DF 102. Physical and 
perceptual nature of color, color awareness, sensitivity and skills in visual 
communication with color as a designer's tool. 

ADN 418 Contemporary Issues in Art and Design. 3(3-0-0). S. Preq: 
College of Design students only. History of Art I & II or junior standing. 
Explore a range of issues about contemporary art and design ideologies. 
Concentration on selected readings which provide a platform for discussion of 
various ideas, approaches, perspectives and practices in the contemporary 
fields of art and design. 

ADN 419 Multimedia and Digital Imaging. 3(3-0-0). F, S. Preq: DF 102, 
ADN 219. Intensive hands-on investigation of the tools, techniques, and 
processes for the development of interactive multi-media projects. Media 
teams will emphasize shaping an idea into a well thought-out design that 
works as an interactive experience. 

ADN 428 Art and Design: Theory and Practice. 3(3-0-0). F. Preq: 6 

Studios. Senior Level, Art and Design. Conceptual basis for developing a 
personal philosophy regarding the practice of art and design. Theory based 
history of diverse cultures and forces of change: political, economic, religious, 
social, intellectual and philosophical as they affect the fields of art and design. 

ADN 454 Geometry for Designers. 3(3-0-0). S. Preq: Junior standing. 

Geometry and its application to the various fields of design, mathematical and 
drawing skills required. 

ADN 455 Building Workshop. 3(2-2-0). Every 3rd Sem. Preq: DF 102 or 
both ADN 111 and ADN 112. Process and logic of producing one's own 
design. Stnictural behavior, geometry, and materials in the construction of 
physical form usually at a large scale. Evaluative testing with critical support. 

ADN 460 Multimedia and Advanced Digital Imaging Studio. 6(0-9-0). 
F, Sum. Preq: ADN 219. An intensive study of advanced image making 
processes, software, and various computer platforms used in the creation of 
multimedia. In a studio mode, students will place emphasis on creating 
interactive programs and finally transfer images to CD Rom and video with 
audio and special effects. 

ADN 470 Fibers and Surface Design Studio. 6(0-9-0). F, S. Preq: A 

grade of C or belter in DF 101 or ADN 1 1 1 and ADN 112. College of Design 
students; Minors in Design or permission of instructor. Practice of widely 
varying textile techniques with the solving of practical and conceptual design 
problems. Textile end products are designed and produced at full scale in 
appropriate inaterials. Focus includes weaving, knitting, printing and dyeing 
of fabrics, and a wide variety of fabric construction and embellishment 



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processes. Textile history is an ongoing part of the study. Emphasis on 
synthesis of techniques and ideas. 

ADN 472 Advanced Surface Design. 3(0-6-0). F, S. Preq: DF 101, ADN 
272. Advanced problems in the design and production of hand-printed and 
pattern-dyed fabrics. E.xperimentation with advanced color application 
techniques. E.vploration of pattern and image production on fabric and 
development of design abilities in textile media. Specific focus changes each 
semester. 

ADN 480 Intermediate Studio. 6(0-9-0). F, S. Preq: DF 101 and DF 102; 
or ADN 111, ADN 112 and ADN 311. Studio format offering upper level 
undergraduates the opportunity to intensively study general design issues 
(form, color, structure, proportions, scale, etc.) through individual study in 
drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, or printmaking. 

ADN 481 Intermediate Drawing. 3(0-6-0). S. Preq: ADN 281. An 

intermediate-level drawing course that further develops the designer's graphic, 
analytic, observational, and conceptual skills. 

ADN 484 Intermediate Painting. 3(0-6-0). S. Preq: DF 102; or both ADN 
111 and ADN 112. An intermediate-level painting course that through slide 
lectures, class projects, and assigned readings exposes students to 
contemporary painting art movements. Special emphasis given to the formal 
and interpretative analysis of a painting. Acrylic and oil paint are used; 
Projects have assigned and open themes. 

ADN 486 Intermediate Sculpture. 3(0-6-0). S. Preq: ADN 386. An 

intermediate-level sculpture course that further develops the designer's 
analytic, observational, and conceptual skills. 

ADN 487 Sculpture: Life Modeling. 3(0-6-0). F. Preq: DF 102 or ADN 
486. A studio course with direct observation of nature a primary concern. In- 
depth study of specific modeling concepts and processes. 

ADN 490 Art and Design International Studio. 6(0-9-0). F, S, Sum. 

Preq: Junior standing. College of Design or equivalent program. Approval 
Study Abroad Office. Define Art and Design problems and develop design 
solutions in an international setting. Studio projects related to design, culture, 
and traditional and contemporary art forms. Focus on artifact making through 
direct studies. Taught off campus. 

ADN 491 Special Seminar in Design. 1-3. F, S. Seminars on subjects of 
current interest in design. 

ADN 492 Special Topics in Design. 1-3. F, S. Topics of current interest in 
Design & Technology. Used to develop new courses. 

ADN 494 Internship in Design. 3-6. F, S, Sum. Preq: Junior standing; 3.0 
GPA or better. Maximum of 6 credit hours. Supervised field experience in 
design offices, galleries, museums and other organizations. 

ADN 495 Independent Study in Design. 1-6. F, S. Preq: Junior standing 
in Design with 3.0 in Design or better. Maximum 6 credit hours. Special 
projects in art and design developed under the direction of a faculty member 
on a tutorial basis. 



AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION 



AEE 103 Fundamentals of Agricultural and Extension Education. 1(1- 
0-0). F. Cannot receive credit for both AEE 103 and ALS 103. Introduction to 
the scope, purpose, and objectives of university education with an emphasis on 
agricultural education, extension education, and agricultural communications. 
Students will explore College and departmental resources, academic policies 
and procedures, the agricultural industry, career opportunities, and current 
trends and issues in agriculture. 

AEE (ED) 206 Introduction to Teaching Agriculture. 3(2-3-0). F 

Introduction to teaching agricultural education in middle and secondary 
schools and collaborative efforts for teaching agricultural education to adults 
as rural community situations dictate. Field experiences include three hours 
per week of structured observations of classroom teachers, teacher assistant 
activities, and reflections of the experience. 



AEE (ED) 226 Computer Applications and Information Technology 
in Agricultural & Extension Ed. 3(1-4-0). F, S. Use of computers and 
commercially produced agricultural software; the computer as a management 
tool; agricultural occupational applications of the computer; a multimedia 
instructional tool in agricultural classrooms and training situations; use of 
technology for processing information and imaging; network access; and 
electronic communications. 

AEE 230 Introduction to Cooperative Extension. 2(1-3-0). F. History, 
organization, and mission of Cooperative Extension in the United States. 
Structure of local extension offices. Exploration of extension careers. Field 
experience in an extension office required. 

AEE (ED) 303 Administration and Supervision of Student 

Organizations. 3(2-2-0). Preq: AEE 206 or EOE 207. Principles and 
techniques for organizing, administering and super\'ising student organization 
activities. 

AEE 311 Communication Methods and Media. 3(3-0-0). F. Preq: ENG 
101. Foundations of agricultural communications. Technologies of 
agricultural communication and the systematic approach to the development of 
agricultural communication materials. Development of applied skills in 
design, production, evaluation, and dissemination of information unique to 
agricultural sciences and media. 

AEE (ED) 322 Experiential Learning in Agriculture. 2(2-0-0). F. 

Planning, organizing, implementing, supervising and evaluating Supervised 
Agricultural Experience (SAE) programs in agriculture. 

AEE 323 Leadership Development in Agriculture. 2(2-0-0). F. 

Leadership development in agricultural and related settings; principles and 
techniques for developing leadership skills; development of understanding of 
the dynamic interactions of personal characteristics, technical skills, 
interpersonal influence, commitment, goals and power necessary for effective 
leaders; issues and problems facing the leadership of agriculture. 

AEE 325 Planning and Delivering Non-Formal Education. 3(2-2-0). F. 
Preq: AEE 230. Adult learning theory and practice, including planning non- 
formal educational programs for adults, methods of instructional delivery, 
effective use of instructional technology, marketing educational programs, and 
evaluation of educational outcomes. Microteaching (practice teaching 
presentations) and group presentations required as part of laboratory 
assignments. 

AEE (ED) 327 Conducting Summer Programs in Agricultural 

Education. 1(0-3-0). F. Preq: AEE (ED) 206; AEE (ED) 322; and AEE 323. 
Field experience emphasizing summer agricultural education programs. 
Individualized instruction for students during supervised agricultural 
experience visits and youth organization activities. Professional development 
and program improvement activities. 

AEE 423 Practicum in Agricultural Extension/Industry. 1-8. S, Sum. 
Preq: AEE (ED) 426, Senior standing and Consent of Instructor. Coreq: AEE 
(ED) 490. Participation in professional work experiences in preparation for 
effective leadership positions in the Cooperative Extension Service or the 
agribusiness industry. 

AEE (ED) 424 Planning Agricultural Educational Programs. 3(3-0-0). 
S. Preq: AEE (ED) 426. Coreq: AEE (ED) 427 or Consent of Instructor. 
Principles of program planning applied to educational programs in agriculture; 
theory and field experiences in planning, organizing, and evaluating secondary 
agricultural education programs: development of plans for conducting all 
aspects of the complete agricultural education program. 

AEE (ED) 426 Methods of Teaching Agriculture. 3(2-2-0). F. Preq: Jr. 

standing or Consent of the Instructor. Discussion and practice in planning and 
presenting instruction in agriculture in formal and informal settings. 
Principles and application of approaches to teaching and organizing 
instruction, motivating students, developing instructional objectives, selecting 
and using teaching techniques, evaluating instruction, and managing classroom 
and laboratory instruction. 

AEE (ED) 427 Student Teaching in Agriculture. 8(2-15-0). S. Preq: 

AEE (ED) 426; Admission to Professional Semester. Coreq: AEE (ED) 490, 
AEE (ED) 424. Skills and techniques in teaching agriculture in a public school 



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selling. Secondary agricultural education program teaching experience under 
the supervision of university faculty and an experienced agriculture teacher. 

AEE 470 Agricultural Communications. 3(3-0-0). S. Preq: AEE 311. 

Senior Standing. Use of agricultural communication materials. Emphasis on 
application of principles, materials and processes of B&W and color 
photography to problems of communication and the development of visual 
presentation materials for instruction and training. 

AEE 478 Extension as Non-Formal Education. 3(3-0-0). S. Preq: 

Advanced undergraduate or PBS. Extension as a system of non-formal 
education, how it functions in USA and other countries (with special attention 
to agricultural extension), historical antecedents and philosophical 
foundations, mission, organization, methods, problems dealt with; how 
technology and behavioral sciences are/can be utilized; provides actual 
experience v\ ith extension and w ith conceptual/theoretical ideas that undergird 
practice. 

AEE (ED) 490 Seminar in Agricultural and Extension Education. I( I - 

0-0). S. Sum. Preq: Admission to Professional Semester. Analysis of 
opportunities and challenges facing educational leaders in agriculture. 

AEE 492 External Learning Experience in Agricultural and Extension 
Education. 1-6. F, S. Sum. Preq: Sophomore standing. Not intended for 
teaching licensure for students in AEE. Learning experience within an 
academic framework that utilizes facilities and resources external to the 
campus. Contact and arrangements with prospective employers initiated by the 
student and approved by the faculty adviser, prospective employer, and the 
departmental teaching coordinator prior to the experience. 

AEE 493 Special Problems in .Agriculture and Extension Education. 1- 

6. F, S, Sum. Preq: Sophomore Standing. Not intended for teacher licensure 
for .students in AEE. A learning experience in agriculture and extension 
education within an academic framework that utilizes departmental campus 
facilities and resources. Arrangements must be initiated by the student and 
approved by a faculty adviser and the departmental teaching coordinator. 

AEE 495 Special Topics in Agricultural and Extension Education. 1-3. 
F, S, Sum. Not Intended for teacher licensure for students in AEE. Offered as 
needed to present material not normally available In regular course offerings 
or for offerings of new courses on a trial basis. 



AFRICANA STUDIES 



APS (MUS) 230 Introduction to African-American Music. 3(3-0-0). F. 

Comprehensive sur\ey of African-American music in the United States from 
Colonial times to the, with emphasis on its unique features and contributions 
to American culture. 

AFS (MDS) 240 African Civilization. 3(3-0-0). F, S. Sum. An 

interdisciplinary study of centers of African civilization from antiquity to the 
lyftOs. Such centers include ancient Egypt, Nubia, Axum, Ghana, Mali, 
Songhal, Kilwa, Malinda. Sofola, Zinzibarand Monomotapa. 

AFS (MDS) 241 Introduction to African-American Studies U. 3(3-0- 
0). F. S, Sum. Second in a two semesters sequence in the interdisciplinary 
study of sub-Saharan Africa, its arts, culture, and people, and the African- 
American experience. 



AFS (HI) 276 Introduction to History of West Africa. 3(3-0-0). F, S. 
The history of Western Africa. Forest civilizations and the slave trade, trade 
and the expansion of Islam, colonialism in West Africa; African nationalism 
and the achievement of independence; and postcolonial West Africa. 

AFS (SOC) 305 Racial and Ethnic Relations. 3(3-0-0). F. S. Sum. Preq: 
3 cr. In SOC, 200 level. Study of the nature of the relationships among racial 
and ethnic groups in societies around the world but with emphasis on the 
United States. Explores topics such as inequalities of wealth, power, and 
status, racism, conflict, and social boundaries among groups. Cunent trends in 
intergroup relations are discussed. 

AFS 340 African American Theatre. 3(0-0-0). S. This course examines 
African American dramaturgy and its impact on American theatre. We will 
study plays from the early period, 1X47-1938, and from the recent period, 
1935 to the present. This course will investigate the thematic structure of each 
section of plays Including family life, social protest, and religion. The course 
will also help students to better understand the social milieu that shaped the 
content of each play. 

AFS (MDS) 342 Introduction to the African Diaspora. 3(3-0-0). S. 

Exploration of the global experiences of people of African descent. 
Geographical areas include the America. Europe. Asia, and the Caribbean. 
Exploration of the web of interrelated histories, social dynamics, and politico- 
economic processes affecting and reflecting world cultures and histories. 
Foundational course for the exploration of methodological Issues and 
theoretical concerns in the field of African Diaspora Studies 

AFS (MDS) 343 African Religions. 3(3-0-0). S, Alt. yrs. (odd). 

Examination of African Religions on the African continent and throughout the 
African Diaspora. Focus on traditional religious practices, African 
reformulation of Islam and Christianity. New Orleans and Haitian vodun, 
Cuban Santeria, and Brazilian Candomblc. Designed to de-mystify African 
religion without divesting it of its cultural uniqueness and richness. 

AFS (MDS) 344 Leadership in African American Communities. 3(3- 
0-0). F, S. Historical, cultural and political examination of the dynamics of 
leadership in African American communities. Focus on structure of 
Leadership in the context of gender, ideology, and style. Interdisciplinary 
examination of impact of leaders on broader American society. 

AFS (MDS, PSY) 345 Psychology and the African American 

Experience, 3(3-0-0). F, Alt. yrs. (odd). Preq: PSY 200 or PSY 201. Historical 
and cultural examination of the psychological experiences of African 
American experience from pre-American times to the present 
mental health, personality. Identity development, racism, 
psychological empowerment and an African-centered worldvlew. 
of contemporary Issues within the African American community. 



Focus on 
oppression. 
Discussion 



AFS (MDS) 346 Black Popular Culture. 3(3-0-0). F, S, Sum. A 

multidlsciplitiary examination of contemporary black cultural expression in 
film, music, art, and the media. Emphasis on race, class, gender, and political 
discourse. 

AFS (ENG) 349 African Literature in English. 3(3-0-0). S. Anglophone 
literature in Africa. Emphasis on the relationship between the African world- 
view and literary production and the persistent trend by African writers to 
connect literature with politics. Writers such as Achebe, Ngugi, Soyinka, and 
Serote. 



AFS (ENG) 248 Survey of African-American Literature. 3(3-0-0). F, 

S. African- American writing and its relationships to American culture and 
history. Covers such writers as Wheatley, Douglass, Chesnutt, Dunbar, 
DuBois, Hughes, Hurston, Wright, and Morrison. 



AFS (HI) 372 .\frican-American History Through the Civil War, 

1619-1865. 3(3-0-0). Preq: 3 hours of history or sophomore standing. African 
background and continuity of the particular role, experience and influence of 
.•\frlcan Americans in the United States through the Civil War. 



AFS (MLS) 260 History of Jazz. 3(3-0-0). Alt yrs. History of jazz and 
the contributions of major artists. Emphasis of the various styles that have 
contributed to this American art fonn. Investigation of structural forms in the 
jazz idiom. 



AFS (HI) 373 African-American History Since 1865. 3(3-0-0). Preq: 3 
hours of history or sophomore standing. The history of African-Americans 
from the Reconstruction era through the Civil Rights movement of the 1950s 
and 1960s to the present. 



AFS (HI) 275 Introduction to History of South and East Africa. 3(3-0- 
0). F. S. Sum. The .African kingdoms (Lunda. Buganda, and Zulu); the 
European encroachment; the origins of colonialism and the character of 
colonial societies and economies. South African apartheid; African protect, 
nationalism and Independence. 



AFS (ENG) 375 African American Cinema. 3(3-0-0). F. Preq: ENG 
I I2Z or ENG 101. Survey and analysis of African American film culture from 
1900-present. Examination of pre-Hollywood, classical Hollywood, and 
Independent filmmaking. Particular focus on independent filmmakers' 
response to dominant industry representations and the work of filmmakers 
who seek to create a specifically African American cinematic style. 



210 



AFS (MDS, PS) 409 Black PoUtical Participation in America. 3(3-0-0). 
F. African American political participation in the United States; political 
culture, socialization, and mobilization, with a focus on the interaction 
between African Americans and actors, institutions, processes, and policies of 
the American political system. 

AFS (MDS) 442 Issues in the African Diaspora. 3(3-0-0). F, Alt. yrs. 
(odd). Multidisciplinary exploration of the interrelated histories, social 
dynamics, and politico-economic processes of the experiences of people of 
African descent throughout the world. Particular focus on the experiences of 
slavery, artistic expression, gender practices, and the impact of the nation 
state. 

AFS (ENG) 448 African-American Literature. 3(3-0-0). S. Preq: Junior 
standing. Survey of African-American literature and its relationships to 
American culture, with an emphasis on fiction and poetry since 1945. Writers 
such as Bontemps, Morrison, Huston, Baldwin, Hayden, Brooks, Naylor, 
Harper, and Dove. 

AFS (HI) 455 History of the Civil Rights Movement. 3(3-0-0). Alt. yrs. 
Preq: junior standing or permission of instructor. Credit will not be given both 
for HI 455 and HI 555. The black revolution; stages and leaders of the 
movement; successes and failures in the fight for desegregation, the vote, and 
economic opportunity; impact of Civil Rights movement on the United States. 

AFS (HI) 475 History of the Republic of South Africa. 3(3-0-0). F. S. 
Preq: 3 hours of history. Credit will not be given for both HI 475 and HI 575. 
Evolution of the Republic of South Africa's society, with emphasis on the 
interaction of diverse peoples and cultures. Particular attention is given to the 
period since 1870. 

AFS (HI) 476 Leadership in Modern Africa. 3(3-0-0). Alt. yrs. Preq: 3 

hours of history. Recent sub-Saharan African political history (excluding 
South Africa). Overview of concepts, vocabulary, historical trends. Detailed 
examination of specific African countries as case studies, such as Ghana, 
Nigeria, Zimbabwe, Tanzania. 

AFS (HI) 479 Africa (sub-Saharan) in the Twentieth Century. 3(3-0- 
0). S, Alt. yrs. (even). Preq: 3 hrs. of history. Credit will not be given for both 
HI 479 and 579. Developments in sub-Saharan Africa during the colonial 
period, from the end of the nineteenth century to the advent of decolonization 
in the eariy 1960s. Interplay of political, social, economic and cultural factors 
in the experiences of African peoples during this period. 

AFS 491 Study Abroad in Africana Studies. 3(3-0-0). Sum. Specific 

category of revolving set of field/seminar courses involving multidisciplinary 
focal areas taught in foreign countries through Africana Studies. Course 
includes pre-trip orientation and readings and onsite field experiences and 
lectures. Additional program fees, travel costs and appropriate immunizations 
are required beyond registration fees. 

AFS (MDS) 497 Topics in African-American Studies. 3(3-0-0). F. S. 
Preq: MDS 240. Multidisciplinary examination of selected topics in African- 
American studies. 



AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES 



ALS 103 Introductory Topics in Agriculture and Life Sciences. 1(1-0- 
0). F, S. Not open to juniors and seniors. Introduction to scope and objectives 
of university education. Emphasis on sciences, particularly as related to 
agriculture and life sciences. Departmental programs, computers, career 
opportunities and more. 

ALS 110 Career Exploration Seminar. 1(1-0-0). S. Ag and Life Science 
Major. Students learn about the career decision-making process through 
integration of self-knowledge and research in the world of work. Emphasis is 
placed on Agriculture and Life Sciences careers. Course is targeted towards 
undeclared majors, or those who desire experiences in career exploration and 
planning. Students assess interests, values, skills and personal strengths while 
learning about a variety of occupational resources. Effective career 
management and job seeking skills emphasized. Career mentors are utilized 
for each student. 



ALS 295 Special Topics in Agriculture and Life Sciences. 1-3. F, S, 

Sum. Offered as needed to present material not normally available in regular 
departmental course offerings; or for offerings of new courses on a trial basis. 

ALS 398 Agriculture and Life Sciences Honors Seminar. 2(2-0-0). S. 
Preq: Enrollment by invitation for sophomores or juniors in CALS with GPA 
3.35 or higher. A seminar/discussion honors course with emphasis on a team 
approach to scientific research into topics that link science with issues in 
society; exposure to leadership skills and bioethics; requirement of detailed 
written or oral reports: career development in the agricultural and life sciences; 
required participation in on- and off-campus scholarly retreats. 

ALS 495 Special Topics in Agriculture and Life Sciences. 1-3. F, S, 

Sum. Offered as needed to present material not normally available in regular 
departmental course offerings or for offering of new courses on a trial basis. 

ALS 498 Honors Research or Teaching I. 1-3. F, S. Sum. Preq: ALS 398 
& GPA 3.25 or higher A maximum of 6 credits for ALS 498 & ALS 499 
combined. Honors research or teaching for students in Agriculture and Life 
Sciences. First of a two-course sequence. Identification of a project and 
development of a proposal; literature search, planning, and work initiation. 

ALS 499 Honors Research or Teaching 11. 2-4. F. S. Sum. Preq: ALS 

498 & GPA 3.25 or higher. A maximum of 6 credits for ALS 498 and ALS 

499 combined. Honors research or teaching for students in Agriculture and 
Life Sciences. Completion of work initiated in ALS 498. Analysis of results. 
Preparation and presentation of written and oral reports. 



ANIMAL SCIENCE 



ANS 105 Introduction to Companion Animals. 3(3-0-0). F. S. Restricted 
to Class FR and SO. Introduction to animals that people keep as companions. 
Variation, behavior, anatomy, physiology, disease, and training of animals as 
diverse as fish, snakes, mice, rats, birds, cats, and dogs. Special relationships 
between humans and companion animals in a societal context. 

ANS 110 Introduction to Equine Science. 3(3-0-0). F. Restricted to Class 
FR and SO. History, management, and use of horses and their profound impact 
on society. Selection, care, and enjoyment of horses with emphasis on 
genetics, nutrition, reproduction, behavior, and health. 

ANS 150 Introduction to Animal Science. 4(3-3-0). F, S. Fundamental 
principles of animal management; contributions of animals and animal 
products to humanity; application of science to animal production; issues 
regarding animal production. 

ANS 201 Techniques of Animal Care. 2(0-4-0). S. Preq: ANS 150 or 

ANS 230. Major IAS or SAS, or instructor permission. A laboratory course in 
the applied management of beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine and small ruminants 
with participatory assignments of common techniques utilized in livestock 
production. 

ANS 202 Techniques of Horse Care. 2(0-4-0). S. Preq: ANS 150. Major 
IAS or SAS. Opportunities to learn applied management skills required in 
horse production, with emphasis on common techniques utilized in horse 
production. 

ANS 205 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals. 3(2-2-0). F. S. 
Preq: ZO 160. BIO 183 or BIO 125; ANS 150. Basic concepts relating 
mammalian structure and function with emphasis on livestock species. 
Fundamentals of neuromuscular activity, digestion, absorption as well as 
regulation of homeostasis relevant to production of milk, wool, and muscle 
growth efficiency. 

ANS (HS) 215 Basic Agricultural Genetics. 3(3-0-0). F. Preq: ZO 160, 
BIO 183 or BIO 125. Basic principles of inheritance in plants and animals of 
agricultural significance. Emphasis on transmission genetics and its effects on 
the usefulness of plants and animals. Introduction to basic principles of plant 
and animal improvement. 

ANS 220 Reproduction and Lactation in Domestic Animals. 4(3-3-0). F. 
S. Preq: ANS 205. Biological processes in reproduction and lactation with 
emphasis on domestic animals. Environmental and genetic factors that affect 
these processes. Identification, evaluation and solutions of problems in these 
physiological areas. 



211 



ANS 230 Nutrition of Domestic Animals. 4(3-3-0). F, S. Preq: ANS 150; 
ANS 205 recommended. Introduction to nutrition, digestion, and absorption in 
domestic mammals. Major nutrient classes and their functions in the body, 
feed classification and chemical analysis, feed processing, and ration 
formulation to meet nutritional requirements. 

ANS (FS, NTR) 301 Introduction to Human Nutrition. 3(3-0-0). F, S, 
Sum. Preq: Sophomore standing. Food science majors may use as a free 
elective only. Functions, dietary sources and deficiencies of essential nutrients 
in humans; a balanced diet; role of nutrients in heart disease, cancer, 
hypertension, osteoporosis; weight control and eating disorders; 
vegetarianism; food safety; dietary supplements; government regulation of 
food supply; food quackery. 

ANS 303 Principles of Equine Evaluation. 2( 1-3-0). S. Preq: ANS 1 10. 
Conformation and function, performance, and soundness of the horse. Breed 
standards, rules, and regulations for evaluation, selection, and performance. 
Field trips. 

ANS 306 Equine Behavioral Modification. 3(2-3-0). F. Preq: ANS 202. 
Departmental Approval Required, SAS and IAS majors only. Equine 
behavioral modification (training) of a young horse, including haltering, 
grooming, learning to overcome fear, ground training, longeing, ground 
driving, trailering, tacking up, and accepting cues from a rider to make the 
horse more marketable in preparation for sale. Study of the promotion, sales, 
and marketing of horses, including legal issues. 



marketing of sheep and goats. Role of genetics, nutrition, reproduction and 
animal health. Hands-on experience and field trips during labs. 

ANS 410 Equine Management. 3(2-2-0). S. Preq: ANS 110 and junior 
standing. F.quine anatomy, physiology, nutrition, genetics and health. 
Laboratory emphasis on reproductive management, breeding, problem solving, 
and management skills. Field trips required. 

ANS (NTR, PO) 415 Comparative Nutrition. 3(3-0-0). F. Preq: CH 220 
or both 221 and 223. Principles of nutrition, including the classification of 
nutrients and the nutrient requirements of and species for health, growth, 
maintenance and productive functions. 

ANS (NTR) 419 Human Nutrition in Health and Disease. 3(3-0-0). S. 
Preq: ANS 230, or ANS/FS/NTR 301 or FS/NTR 400 or ANS/NTR/PO 415. 
Junior standing. Current concepts regarding, and physiological bases of the 
roles of nutrition in the prevention and treatment of acute and chronic disease 
states in humans with emphasis on the process of scientific discovery, reading 
of original research and transformation of research findings to public policy. 

ANS (PO) 425 Feed Mill Management and Feed Formulation. 3(2-3- 
0). S. Preq: ANS (NTR, PO) 415 or ANS 230; CH 220 or 221. Feed mill 
management, feed ingredient purchasing, inventory, storage, and quality 
evaluation, computerized feed formulation, feeding programs for poultry and 
swine, feed mill design, equipment, maintenance, operation, safety, state and 
federal regulations pertaining to feed manufacture. 



ANS 309 Livestock Evaluation. 3(2-3-0). S. Preq: ANS 1 50. Students will 
be exposed to basic concepts associated with growth, development and value 
determination of livestock. Familiarization with official USDA grading 
standards for cattle, sheep, swine and goats is emphasized. Introduction to 
judging terminology, placing classes of livestock and justification through oral 
reasons. 

ANS (FS, PO) 322 Muscle Foods and Eggs. 3(2-2 I). F. Preq: ZO 

160,BIO 181, BIO 183, or BIO 125. Processing and preserving fresh poultry, 
red meats, seafood, and eggs. Ante- and post-mortem events as they affect 
quality, yield, and compositional characteristics of muscle foods. Principles 
and procedures involved in the production of processed meat items. 

ANS (FS) 324 Milk and Dairy Products. 2(2-0-0). F. Preq: ZO 160,BIO 
181, BIO 183, or BIO 125. Composition of milk and dairy products, federal 
standards, raw milk procurement, cleaning and sanitizing and quality 
attributes. 

ANS (FS, PO) 350 Introduction to HACCP. 3(3-0-0). F, S. Offered only 
as a world wide web course through the OtTice of Instructional 
Telecommunications. Introductory course on the Hazard Analysis and Critical 
Control Points System (HACCP), which is designed to decrease hazards in 
foods. An International HACCP Alliance approved curriculum which covers 
prerequisite programs. A step-by-step approach for developing and 
implementing a HACCP plan for USDA regulated food-processing plants. 

ANS 400 Companion Animal Management. 3(2-3-0). S. Preq: ANS 230. 
Anatomy, physiology, nutrition, genetics, and health of companion animals 
including cats, dogs, rabbits, rats, mice, reptiles, amphibians, and fish. 
Problem solving and enterprise management skills in laboratories. 

ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management. 3(2-3-0). S. Preq: ANS 150 and 

junior standing. Principles and practices of production, management and 
marketing of beef cattle. Role of genetics, nutrition, reproduction and animal 
health. 

ANS 403 Swine Management. 3(2-3-0). F. Preq: ANS 230 and junior 

standing. Management principles associated with swine production. Emphasis 
on interactions of health, equipment, nutrition, reproduction and genetics 
during nursery, finishing, farrowing and breeding phases of production. Waste 
management practices and alternatives, development of marketing strategies 
and economic evaluation of management practices. 

ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management. 3(2-3-0). F. Alt yrs (odd). Preq; 

ANS 230. The management of economic, nutritional, genetic, and 
physiological factors that influence the operation of a dairy enterprise. 

ANS 408 Small Ruminant Management. 3(2-3-0). F Alt. Yrs. (Even). 
Preq: ANS 230. Principles and practices of production, management, and 



ANS 440 Selection of Domestic Animals. 3(2-3-0). F. Preq: ANS/HS 2 1 5 
and ST 31 1 or ST/BUS 350. Modem evaluation and selection procedures for 
domestic animals; selection goals, estimation of breeding values and 
performance testing; their impact on genetic changes. 

ANS 4S2-Advanced Reproductive Physiology and Biotechnology. 3(3-0-0). 
S, Alt. yrs. (odd). Preq: ANS 220. Comparative approach to examining aspects 
of reproductive physiology in selected vertebrate species. Detailed 
examination of current reproductive biotechnologies. 

ANS 453 Growth and Development of Domestic Animals. 3(3-0-0). F, 
Alt. yrs. (even). Preq: ANS 230 or equivalent; junior standing. Credit will not 
be given for both ANS 453 and 553. Introduction to the basic concepts of 
growth with emphasis on domestic mammals. Growth of the major classes of 
animal tissues and regulation by endogenous and exogenous factors. 
Relationship to etTiciency of animal production. 

ANS 454 Lactation, Milk and Nutrition. 3(2-2-0). S, Alt yrs (even). Preq: 
ANS 230 or FS/NTR 400; BCH 451 or ZO 421. Credit will not be given for 
both ANS 454 and 554. Nutritional properties of milk as a high-quality food 
with nutritional diversity. Principles of physiology, biochemistry and cell 
biology in the mammary gland. Procedures of milk production and milk 
collection for milk quality and nutrition. Human lactation vs. that of domestic 
animals. Impacts of biotechnology and food safety on dairy production. 

ANS 492 External Learning Experience. 1-6. F, S. Preq: Sophomore 

standing. A learning experience in agriculture and life sciences within an 
academic framework that utilizes facilities and resources which are external to 
the campus. Contact and arrangements with prospective employers must be 
initiated by student and approved by a faculty adviser, the prospective 
employer, and the departmental teaching coordinator prior to the experience. 

ANS 493 Special Problems in Animal Science. 1-6. F. S. Preq: 

Sophomore standing. A learning experience in agriculture and life sciences 
w ithin an academic framework that utilizes departmental campus facilities and 
resources (Arrangements must be initiated by student and approved by a 
faculty adviser and the departmental teaching coordinator). 

ANS 495 Special Topics in Animal Science. 1-3. F, S, Sum. Offered as 
needed to present material not normally available in regular course offerings 
or for ol'fcnnL' of new courses on a trial basis. 



ANTHROPOLOGY 



ANT 251 Physical Anthropology. 3(3-0-0). F, S. Sum. Study of human 
evolution. Processes of evolution, human variation and race, behavior and 
morphology of nonhuman primates, and the fossil record. Emphasis on the 



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study of human biosocial adaptation, past and present, and on humans as 
culture-bearing primates. 

ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology. 3(3-0-0). F, S, Sum. Comparative study 
of contemporary human culture, social institutions and processes that influence 
behavior. Includes examples from cultural backgrounds and the student's own 
culture system. 

ANT 253 Introduction to Prehistory. 3(3-0-0). F, S. Sum. World-wide 
survey of origins of human society, technology and culture in Old Stone Age. 
and origins of agriculture, cities, and civilizations of the Bronze and Iron Age 
in Europe, Asia, Africa, and pre-Columbian Middle and South America. 

ANT 254 Language and Culture. 3(3-0-0). F, S, Sum. Focus among the 
aspects of human language and between aspects of language and culture. 
Topics such as: descriptive and comparative linguistics, structuralism, 
language and thought, sociolinguistics, bilingualism, culture change and 
linguistic changes. 

ANT (SOC) 261 Technology in Society and Culture. 3(3-0-0). F. S. 

Processes of social and cultural change with a focus on role of technological 
innovation. Cross-cultural emphasis. Workplace changes and societal risks 
associated with technological innovations. Special attention to the role of 
scientists and engineers in socio-cultural change. Topical case studies apply 
course concepts and principles. Core sociological and anthropological 
concepts, methods, and theories. 

ANT 310 Native Peoples and Cultures of North America. 3(3-0-0). 

Preq: ANT 252 or HI 365. Native North American peoples and cultures 
including Eskimos and Aleuts. Theories of origin and selected prehistoric 
cultural manifestations. People and cultures at the time of European contact 
and post-contact cultural change. Contemporary problems and prospects. 

ANT 325 Andean South America. 3(3-0-0). Preq: ANT 252 or HI 215 or 
HI 216. The societies, cultures, politics, economics and ecology of the Andean 
countries of South America (Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile, Colombia). Special 
attention to the development of pre-Columbian Andean Societies. 

ANT 330 Peoples and Cultures of Africa. 3(3-0-0). S. Preq: ANT 252 or 
HI 275 or HI 276. African peoples and cultures, especially in sub-Saharan 
Africa; past and present social patterns of indigenous African populations from 
a cross-cultural perspective. 

ANT 346 Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia. 3(3-0-0). F. Preq: 

ANT 252. Southeast Asian peoples and cultures; past and present social 
patterns of selected mainland and insular Southeast Asian peoples; culture 
change; relations between minorities and dominant ethnic groups; 
development of nationalism. 

ANT 370 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology. 3(3-0-0). F. Preq: 

ANT 251. Broad overview of forensic anthropology-an applied field of 
biological anthropology. Application of the science of biological anthropology 
to the legal process and humanitarian arena. Identification of skeletal remains 
lo determine age, sex, ancestry, stature, and unique features of a decedent. 
General identification techniques addressed but proficiency not expected. 

ANT 371 Human Variation. 0(0-0-0). F, Ah. yrs. (odd). Preq: ANT 251. 
Survey of basic principles of population genetics with emphasis on 
mechanisms that shape human biological variation. Analysis of laws of 
heredity exhibited in modem human populations via microevolution and 
adaptation. Historical development of concepts with specific application to 
physical and forensic anthropology. Discussion of most current research. 

ANT 373 The Human Fossil Record. 3(3-0-0). Preq: Three hours physical 
anthropology or archaeology. Analysis of the human fossil record and 
consideration of alternate theories of human evolution. 

ANT 411 Overview of Anthropological Theory. 3(3-0-0). S, Alt. yrs. 

(odd). Preq: ANT 252 and one of the tbilowmg. ANT 310,325,330 or 346. 
Coreq: Students cannot receive credit for both ANT 411 and ANT 511. A 
detailed infroduction to anthropological theory, interpretive styles and research 
techniques of major nineteenth and twentieth century anthropologists working 
within the analytic frameworks of their times, positions espoused by 
anthropologists in contemporary debates concerning the discipline's future. 



ANT 412 Applied Anthropology. 3(3-0-0). S. Credit cannot be given for 
both 412 and 512. History, aims, methods and ethics of applied anthropology. 
Anthropological practice in government, industry, community development, 
education, and medicine. Analysis of consequences of development programs 
for culture change. 

ANT 416 Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology. 3(3-0-0). F, Alt. 
yrs. Preq: ANT 252 and one of the following, ANT 310,325,330 or 346. A 
systematic overview of cultural anthropological research methods including 
designing research projects, research techniques, fieldwork methods, and 
cross-cultural comparison. Reviews relevant ethical questions and 
anthropologists' reports of their own fieldwork. 

ANT 419 Ethnographic Field Methods. 3(2-2-0). Sum. Preq: Six hours of 
cultural anthropology. Ethnographic research methods as part of a summer 
field school abroad. Topics: research design, participant observation, field note 
writing, interviewing, sampling, coding, computers in ethnographic research, 
analysis and ethics. 

ANT 420 Biological Bases for Human Social Behavior. 3(3-0-0). Preq: 
ANT 251 or 3 hrs. biological sciences. Applicability of sociobiology to the 
study of the human condition. Nature and uniqueness of human behavior as 
compared to the social behavior of nonhunian animals. 

ANT 431 Tourism, Culture and Anthropology. 3(3-0-0). F, Sum. Preq: 
Three hours of cultural anthropology. Anthropological approach to tourism 
studies with emphasis on cross-cultural aspects of international tourism. 
Attention to impact of mass tourism as compared to alternative tourism; 
environmental and economic impact of tourism; impact of international 
tourists and tourism on local communities. Principal theories of leisure in 
relation to tourism. Theories of culture change in relation to travel and 
tourism. 

ANT (WGS)444 Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Women. 3(3-0-0). S, 

Alt. yrs. Preq: ANT 252 and one of the following, ANT 310,325,330 or 346. 
Comparison of women in a variety of societies: western and non-western; 
hunting and gathering to industrialized. Cross-cultural perspective on the 
similarity and diversity of women's statuses and roles. Effect of gender on 
social position. 

ANT 460 Urban Anthropology. 3(3-0-0). F, Alt. yrs. Preq: ANT 252 and 
one of the following, ANT 310,325,330 or 346. Anthropological study of 
cities. Examination of cross-cultural patterns of behavior in urban areas and 
adaptive strategies that urban dwellers employ. Introduction to major 
theoretical and methodological approaches relevant to an understanding of 
contemporary urbanization. 

ANT 464 Anthropology of Religion. 3(3-0-0). S, Alt. yrs. (even). Preq: 

ANT 252 and one of the following, ANT 310,325,330 or 346. Examination of 
various anthropological perspectives on the role of religion in social life, and 
discussion of theoretical and methodological issues pertaining to the study of 
ritual and belief 

ANT 495 Special Topics in Anthropology. 3(3-0-0). F. S. Sum. Detailed 
investigation of a topic in anthropology. Topic and mode of study determined 
by faculty member(s). 

ANT 496 Anthropology Internship. 6(3-12-0). S. Preq: ANT 412, ANT 
416; Senior standing in Anthropology. Course open only to B.A. in 
Anthropology students. Supervised observation and experience in work 
settings appropriate to anthropological perspectives. Study of the relationships 
between internship setting and relevant anthropological theory, methods and 
research. Weekly seminars, individual conferences and an integrative report. 
Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to internship 
sites. 

ANT 498 Independent Study in Anthropology. 1-6. F. S, Sum. Preq: Six 
hours of ANT. Independent study of a topic in anthropology. Topic and mode 
of study determined by faculty member(s) and student(s). 



ARCHITECTURE 



ARC 102 Architectural Design Fundamentals. 6(9-2-0). S. Preq: DF 

101. Coreq: ARC 162. Undergraduate Architecture majors only. An 
introduction to architectural design. Analysis of exemplary works of 



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architecture through studies of their I'unetional, material, ami perceptual 
characteristics in drawings and models. I"ield trips lo local huildings and 
architecture tlrms. 

ARC 140 Experiencing Architecture. 3(3-0-0). F. Conteniporar> and 

historic houses, public buildings and cities illustrate the practical and aesthetic 
aspects of architecture. The basic elements of architectural t'orm, design 
process, and architectural criticism. 

ARC 141 History of Design I. 3(3-0-0). F. Western design from prehistory 
to Imperial Rome through examples ot architecture and construction, 
landscape and urban planning, pure and applied three- and two-dimensional 
artifacts in their cultural setting. Students draw and/or construct selected 
historical design solutions. 

ARC 142 History of Design H. 3(3-0-0). S. Western design from the early 
Christian to the Modem Age through examples of architecture and 
construction, landscape and urban planning, pure and applied three- and two- 
dimensional artifacts in their cultural setting. Students draw and/or construct 
selected historical design solutions. 

ARC 162 An Introduction to Architecture. 3(3-0-0). S. The purpose of 
architecture examined through its practices, theories and key principles. 
Lectures, projects, and readings expose students to the diverse world of ideas, 
creative work and practical considerations which make up the discipline of 
architecture. 

ARC 201 Architectural Design: Environment. 6(0-9-0). S. Preq: DP 102. 
ARC 141 and ARC 142. Coreq: ARC 211. Investigation of the relationships 
between environment and built form. Solar orientation, topography, 
vegetation, and constructed context in relationship to user needs as parameters 
for justifying design proposals. Particular emphasis on architectural 
conventions of communication. 

ARC 202 Architectural Design: Form. 6(0-9-0). S. Preq; ARC 201, ARC 
261. Coreq: ARC 252. Investigation of relationships between idea and form. 
Composition and precedent as parameters for generating, developing, and 
justifying architectural form. Particular emphasis on electronic media in 
drawing and modeling. 

ARC 211 Natural Systems and Architecture. 3(3-0-0). F. Preq: DF 102. 
Restricted to students in BEDA Program. Relationship between natural and 
architectural systems. Exploration of the implications of natural forces - sun. 
wind and daylight- on architecture. Energy-conscious architectural design and 
site planning strategies to fulfill thermal comfort requirements of people in 
designed ens ironments. 

ARC 232 Structures and Materials. 3(2-2-0). S. Construction materials 
related to structural applications. Theory of structures and introduction to 
quantitative analysis. Implications for design. Historical examples and current 
practices. Laboratory and field trips required. 

ARC 241 History of Architecture. 3(3-0-0). F. Introduction to the 

discipline of architectural history through a study of examples of the built 
environment (urban planning, buildings, and associated decorative arts) in 
western and non-western cultures from antiquity to the present day. 



intellectual, technological, and esthetic developments here and abroad which 
have shaped today's profession. Concepts of professionalism and ethics, legal 
and institutional foundations, and case studies of professional roles in 
architecture. 

ARC 289 Architectural Travel .Study 1. 3(3-0-6). F. S, Sum. Preq: ARC 
141 and ARC 142. Departmental Approval. The study of cities, architectural 
sites, buildings, building complexes, and architectural elements conducted 
independently by students as part of a planned travel-study tour. Includes 
advance research and approval of proposed study topic and itinerary. Students 
will document study through sketches, analytical notations, and a summary 
paper. 

ARC 292 Special Topics in Architecture. 1-3. F, S. Sum. Preq: Consent 
of Instructor. Topics of current interest in .Architecture. Normally used to 
develop new courses. 

ARC 302 Architectural Design: Technology. 6(0-9-0). S. Preq: ARC 

202, ARC 232, Architecture majors. Coreq: ARC 332. An investigation of 
technical systems of buildings - structure, environmental control/energy, 
materials, enclosure, and circulation, their fabrication and assembly and their 
capacity to affect form and tectonic expression as fundamental elements of the 
design process. Particular emphasis on physical models. 

ARC 331 Architectural Structures I. 3(2-2-0). F. Preq: ARC 232. 

Stnictural design process. Combined role of imposed loads and architectural 
function in shaping the form of the building. Interaction of elements in 
structural systems containing beams, columns, trusses, space frames, slabs, 
arches. vault,s, domes, cables, cable networks, fabrics and diaphragms. Case 
studies emphasized. 

ARC 332 Architectural Structures H. 3(2-2-0). S. Preq: ARC 331. 

Structural systems explored through case studies and design projects. 
Emphasis on interaction of structural elements. Tracing of loads in structural 
systems. Sizing of tensile elements, columns, trusses, and llexural elements. 
Design and sizing of joints. 

ARC 400 Architectural Design. 6(0-9-0). F. Sum. Preq: DF 102. Studies 
in architectural design. Projects of many types and scales employed to 
investigate issues in architecture. Emphasis on independent exploration of 
design values and their implications. 

ARC 402 Architectural Design: Integration. 6(0-9-0). S. Preq: ARC 302. 
ARC 432. and ."^RC 441. Coreq: ARC 414. Bachelor of Environmental Design 
in Architecture majors only. The execution of a project in sufficient depth to 
understand the opportunities and discipline resulting from the inclusion of 
building technologies, the elaboration of interior space, and the development, 
representation, and communication of details at a large scale. 

ARC 403 Architectural Design Fundamentals: Environment. 6(0-12-0). 
F. Coreq: ARC 211. M. Arch Track 3 Students only. An introductory 
architectural design studio for M. Arch. Track 3 students inxestigating the 
relationship between environment and built form. Solar orientation, climate, 
topography, vegetation, and constructed context in relationship to user needs 
as parameters for design proposals. Particular emphasis on design 
fundamentals and conventions of architectural communication. 



ARC 251 Architectural Representation. 3(2-2-0). F. Students in EDA 

program. Historical, theoretical, and methodological investigation of 
architectural representation including: two- and three-dimensional, traditional 
media and digital media. Technical projects will introduce the traditional 
methods of architectural representation and emerging digital technologies and 
the correlating perceptual and emotive effects. 



ARC 404 Architectural Design Fundamentals: Form. 6(0-12-0). S. 

Preq: ARC 403, ARC 252. Coreq: ARC 261. M. Arch Track 3 Students only. 
An introductory architectural design studio for M. Arch. Track 3 students 
investigating relationships between idea and form. Composition and precedent 
as parameters for generating, developing, and justifying architectural form. 
Particular emphasis on electronic media in drawing and modeling. 



ARC 252 Architectural Design Methods. 3(3-0-0). S. Preq: DF 102. A 
comprehensive suney of methods for conceiving, developing, justifying, and 
evaluating architectural form from historical, cultural, social, technical and 
aesthetic perspectives. 

ARC 253 Architectural Communication. 3(2-2-0). F, S. Preq: DF 102 or 
Graduate standing in .Architecture. Basic graphic communication skills in 
architecture. Emphasis on the use of draw ing as a path to better design and on 
the communication of architectural ideas. 

ARC 261 The Discipline of Architecture. 3(3-0-0). F. The modem 

architecture profession in the U.S. Emphasis on historical events and 



ARC 405 Architectural Design Fundamentals: Technology. 6(0-12-0). 
S. Preq: ARC 404. Coreq: ARC 331. M. Arch Track 3 Students only. An 
introductory architectural design studio for M. Arch. Track 3 students in which 
the technical systems of building - structure, environmental control/energy, 
materials, enclosure, and circulation; their fabrication and assembly; and their 
capacity to affect form and tectonic expression - arc explored as fijndamental 
elements of the design process. Particular emphasis on physical models. 

ARC 406 Architectural Design Fundamentals: Integration. 6(0-12-0). 
S. Preq: ARC 405. Coreq: ARC 332. ARC 414. and ARC 441. M. Arch Track 
3 Students only. .An introductory architectural design studio for M. Arch. 
Track 3 students involving the execution of a project in sufficient depth to 



214 



understand the opportunities and discipline resulting from the inclusion of 
building technologies, the elaboration of interior space, and the development, 
representation, and communication of details at a large scale. 

ARC 414 Environmental Control Systems. 3(3-0-0). S. Preq: ARC 211, 
Junior standing. Studies in light, heat, moisture, air motion, and sound in 
architectural environments. Mechanical, electrical and/or electronic 
equipment for illumination, heating, cooling, ventilation, vertical 
transportation and communication in buildings. Water and waste, fire 
protection and safety, and acoustic systems in architecture. 

ARC 432 Architectural Construction Systems. 3(2-3-0). F. Preq: ARC 
232. Building construction systems related to architectural design. Historical 
and current building practices. Implications for design and systems selection. 
Case studies. Field trips are required. 

ARC 441 History of Contemporary Architecture. 3(3-0-0). F. Preq: 

Junior standing or ARC 141 or 142. A survey and critical examination of 
modem architecture from its origins in 19th-century philosophy and 
technology to the most recent developments in world architecture. 

ARC 442 History of NC Architecture. 3(3-0-0). S. Preq: ARC 141,142, 
Jr. Standing in COD. Survey of NC Architecture from 17th-century settlement 
to World War II. Coverage of a wide range of building types and development 
patterns. 

ARC 445 Aesthetics and Design. 3(3-0-0). S. Preq: ARC 141 or 142. An 
examination of the identity, nature, and function of aesthetic experience, 
cognition and action as related to the design disciplines and reflected in 
designed artifacts. 

ARC 490 Architecture International Studio. 6(0-9-0). F, S, Sum. Preq: 
ARC 202. Exploration of architectural problems and development of design 
solutions in an international setting. Studio projects focused on current 
conditions found in the host culture, profession, and community. 

ARC 492 Special Topics in Architecture. 1-3. F, S, Sum. Topics of 

current interest in Architecture. Normally used to develop new courses. 

ARC 495 Independent Study in Architecture. 1-3. F, S, Sum. Preq: 3.0 
Junior standing in architecture GPA or belter; and approval of department 
head. Special projects in architecture developed under the direction of a 
faculty member on a tutorial basis. 



AGRICULTURAL & RESOURCE ECONOMICS 



ARE 201 Introduction to Agricultural «& Resource Economics. 3(3-0- 

0). F, S. Preq: MAUI. Credit will not be given for both EC 205 and either EC 
201 or ARE 201. Introduction to economic principles of marginal benefits and 
costs with application to consumer and producer decisions. Functions of 
market exchange systems in determining prices and quantities and creation of 
wealth. Property rights and opportunities for exchange. Role of government in 
dealing with agricultural and resource problems. Macroeconomic analysis 
including infiation, unemployment, money and banking system. 

ARE 210 Consumer Economics 3(3-0-0). S. Role of the consumer in the 
modem economy and application of economic concepts to consumer markets 
and decisions. Economic analysis of home buying and home finance, credit, 
life, health, and property insurance, investments, retirement planning, and 
information collection. Relationship of the macroeconomy to consumer 
decisions. 

ARE 215 Small Business Accounting. 3(2-2-0). F. Preq: ARE 201 or EC 
201 or EC 205. Record keeping for small businesses organized as sole 
proprietorships, partnerships, and family held corporations. Double entry 
accounting principals applied to service and merchandising businesses. 
General Journals, Combination Journals, Subsidiary Journals, Ledgers, 
Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable, Posting, Worksheets. Financial 
Statements, Closing, Payrolls, Cost Basis, Depreciation, Section 179, 
Amortization, Financial Adjustments, and Income Tax Forms. Both manual 
and computerized systems. Semester project of keeping records for a business 
for a portion of the year. 



ARE (EC) 301 Intermediate Microeconomics. 3(3-0-0). F, S, Sum. 

Preq: MA 121 or 131; ARE 201 or EC 205 or EC 201. Credit not allowed for 
both EC (ARE) 301 and EC (ARE) 401. Functioning of the market economy: 
role of prices in determining the allocation of resources; the functioning of the 
firm in the economy; forces governing the production and consumption of 
economic goods. 

ARE 303 Farm Management. 3(2-2-0). F, S. Preq: ARE 201 or EC 201. 
Analytical and planning techniques for making business decisions centered 
around farm business applications. Economic principles and management 
concepts such as budgeting, accounting, finance credit, investment analysis, 
business organization, risk, and taxes as related to practical problems of 
operating a farm business. 

ARE 304 Agribusiness Management. 3(3-0-0). S. Preq: ARE 201 or EC 
201. Management decision-making by food, fiber, horticulture, and forestry 
firms. Emphasis on current agribusiness topics such as information utilization, 
strategic planning, organization structures, competitor intelligence, pricing, 
leadership, crisis management, ethics, and human resource management. 
Business communications, agribusiness case studies, and a computerized 
management simulation game. 

ARE 306 Agricultural Law. 3(3-0-0). F, S. Preq: ARE 201 or EC 201. 
Credit for both ARE 306 and BUS 307 is not allowed. Legal principles of 
practical importance in an agricultural setting: the court system; tort, contract 
and real and personal property law; legal aspects of organizing an 
agribusiness; environmental and labor regulations affecting agriculture; 
income and estate taxation of agriculture. 

ARE 309 Environmental Law & Economic Policy. 3(3-0-0). F. Preq: 
ARE 201 or EC 201. Current federal and state environmental laws and 
regulations and their common law foundations. Relationship of the law and its 
regulatory mechanisms to economic policy issues: externalities, pollution 
ta,xes, incentives, permit trading, and cost-benefit analysis. Major 
environmental topics including water and wetlands, solid and hazardous 
wastes, pesticides, clean air, endangered species and nuisance actions. 
Overview of the legal system. 

ARE 311 Agricultural Markets. 3(3-0-0). F, S. Preq: ARE 201 or EC 
201. Agricultural marketing system and economic forces affecting its structure 
and efficiency. Public policy issues affecting agricultural markets. Emphasis 
on the analysis of current sources of agricultural market information. 
Marketing and storage problems over time; fiitures markets and the 
management of risk; transportation and international trade; government 
agricultural programs. 

ARE 312 Agribusiness Marketing. 3(3-0-0). S. Preq: ARE 201 or EC 

201. Application of marketing and economic principles to decision making in 
contemporary agribusiness firms. Marketing strategies, marketing research 
and information, segmentation and targeting, marketing mix, and market plans 
within food, fiber, natural resource, and production input industries. 
Professional selling skills and knowledge. Off-campus field experience and 
visiting lecturers from the agribusiness industry. 

ARE 321 Agricultural Financial Management. 3(3-0-0). F. Preq: ARE 
201 or EC 201. Fundamental concepts for financial management decision in 
agricultural/farm businesses. Emphasis on financial statement analysis of 
profitability, efficiency, liquidity, repayment capacity, risk, leverage, growlh. 
Capital budgeting, investment decisions, farmland bid price determination, 
farm real estate appraisal. Financial markets and credit institutions serving 
agriculture, lending policies, loan analysis, and interest rate determination. 
Financial structure, performance, condition of farm sector. 

ARE (EC) 336 Introduction to Resource and Environmental 

Economics. 3(3-0-0). S. Preq: ARE 201 or EC 201 or EC 205. Application of 
basic economic tools to understand and evaluate environmental/resource 
policies. Concepts such as property rights, non-market goods, allocation over 
time, externalities, and public goods. Current policy issues such as global 
climate change, evaluating natural resource damages from oil spills, reducing 
the costs of regulations, protecting estuaries, and dealing with non-point 
source pollution. 

ARE (EC) 401 Economic Analysis for Non-Majors. 3(3-0-0). F, S. 

Preq: ARE 201 or EC 205 or EC 201. Not open to undergraduates majoring in 
the Department of .^gricultural and Resource Economics or the College of 
Management. Credit not allowed for both ARE(EC) 301 and 401. 



215 



Intermediate economie theor>' of firm, household, and market behavior. 
Demand, produetion and cost theory, market equilibrium under eompetitive 
and non-eompetitive conditions, and problems of economic efficiency. 

ARE 403 Economics of Consumer Decisions. .^(.1-0-0). Alt. yrs. Preq: 
ARE 201 or EC 201. Not open to undergraduates majoring in the Department 
of Agricultural and Resource Economics or the College of Management. 
Credit not allowed for both ARE 210 and ARE 40.1. Application of economic 
theory of the consumer to lifetime personal resource allocation decisions 
intended for non-major graduate students at the master's level. Emphasis on 
dynamic considerations in consumption and saving, replacement of consumer 
durables, and evaluation of consumer protection policies. 

ARE 423 Futures and Options Markets. 3(2-2-0). S. Preq: ARE(EC) 
301 and ARE 31 1 or BUS 320. Operation and business uses of futures and 
options markets. Emphasis on market institutions, arbitrage price 
relationships, risk analysis, hedging theory and practice, portfolio evaluation 
and market regulation. Similarities among commodity, bond and stock index 
futures emphasized. 

ARE 433 U.S. Agricultural Policy. 3(3-0-0). S. Preq: ARE(EC) 301 or 
ARE(EC) 401. Government economic policies and programs affecting 
agricultural inputs and farm products. Analysis of the rationale, objectives, 
and major types of agricultural programs and their etTects on resource 
allocation and income distribution within agriculture and between agriculture 
and the rest of the economy. 

ARE (EC) 436 Environmental Economics. 3(3-0-0). S. Preq: ARE(EC) 
301. Usefulness of economics in understanding pollution, congestion, 
conservation and other environmental problems. Relevant economic tools 
such as pricing schemes, abatement cost curves, damage functions and benefit- 
cost analysis. Pollution taxes, regulations, marketable permits and subsidies 
considered in designing alterations in the incentive system. Current public 
policy alternatives in the context of non-market decision-making. 

ARE 490 Career Seminar in Agriculture & Resource Economics, 1(1- 
0-0). F. Preq: Junior Standing. Planning and preparing for career choices. 
Resume writing, networking, interviewing, personality characteristics, and job 
searching. Visits w ith employer representati\es. Employer expectations and 
career opportunities. Researching firms and employment opportunities. Oral 
and written presentations. 

ARE 492 External Learning Experience, 1-6. F, S. Preq: Sophomore 
standing. A learning experience in agriculture and life sciences within an 
academic framework that utilizes facilities and resources which are external to 
the campus. Contact and arrangements with prospective employers must be 
initiated by student and approved by a faculty adviser, the prospective 
employer, the departmental teaching coordinator and the academic dean prior 
to the experience. 

ARE 493 Special Problems/Research Exploration. 1-6 F, S. Preq: ARE 
Sophomore standing. A learning experience in agriculture and life sciences 
within an academic framework that utilizes campus facilities and resources. 
Contact and arrangements with prospecti\e employers must be initiated by 
student and appro\ed by a faculty adviser, the prospective employer, the 
departmental teaching coordinator and the academic dean prior to the 
experience. 

ARE 495 Special Topics in .Agricultural and Resource Economics, 1-6. 
Preq: Consent of the Department. Presentation of material not normally 
available in regular course offerings or offering of new courses on a trial basis. 



by theme, place or data. Capstone course for students with an extensive 
background in one of the arts. Topics may vary. 



AEROSPACE STUDIES 



ARTS STUDIES